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Miami-Dade County, Florida comprehensive emergency management plan (CEMP), volume 1

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Title:
Miami-Dade County, Florida comprehensive emergency management plan (CEMP), volume 1
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Miami-Dade County (Fla.). Office of Emergency Management
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Miami (Fla.)
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Miami-Dade County (Fla.). Office of Emergency Management
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English
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"Revised : June 2013"

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South Florida Collection, Government Documents, Green Library, Florida International University
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VOLUME 1 Miami Dade County Miami Dade Emergency Manag e ment (MDEM) 9300 NW 41 st Street Miami, FL 33178 2414 (305) 468 5400 www.miamidade.gov/oem Miami Dade County, Florida Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP)

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 2 of 237 Table of Contents RECORD OF CHANGES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 10 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 12 BASIC PLAN ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 15 INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .................. 15 PURPOSE ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................... 16 SCOPE ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 16 CEMP MAINTENANCE ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 17 HSEEP COMPLIANCE AND PLAN IMPROVEMENT ................................ ................................ ..................... 17 AUTHORITIES AND REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 18 PART 1 AUTHORITIES AND REFERNCES ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 18 Codified Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 18 Memoranda and References ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 18 Americans with Disabilities Act and Guideli nes for Functional Needs Support Services (FNSS) .......................... 18 Miami Dade County ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 19 State of Florida ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 19 Federal Government ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 20 PART 2 MIAMI DADE C OUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCE: CHAPTER 8B EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 20 SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 31 Situation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 31 PART 1 HAZARD ANALYSIS ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 31 Gener al Profile ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 31 Climate ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 31 Geology, Hydrology and Ecology ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 31 Environment ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 35 Population & Demographics ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 35 Cul ture ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 38 Political Governance ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 38 Built Environment ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 39 Economy ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 40 Emergency Management Support Facilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 41 PART 2 NATURAL HAZARDS ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 41 Hurricanes and Tropical Storms ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 42 Tornadoes and Thunderstorms and Lightning Storms ................................ ................................ ............................. 43 Flooding ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 44 Droughts, Hot & Cold Weather, and Contaminated Water Supplies ................................ ................................ ....... 44 Wildfires ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 45 Public Health Hazards ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .................. 45 Epidemic/Disease/Exotic Pests ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 45 Climate C hange ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 46 PART 3 TECHNOLOGICAL HAZARDS ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 48 Hazardous Materials Incidents ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 48 Nuclear Power Plant ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 49 PART 4 HUMAN CAUSED HAZARDS ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 49 Mass Casualty ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................... 50 Civil Disturbance ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 50 Mass Migration ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 50 Coastal Oil Spills ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 51 National Security ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 51 PART 5 HAZARD DEMOGRAPHICS ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 51 Population ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 51 Hazards by Population Sectors ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 52

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 3 of 237 Economic Profile ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 53 Assumptions ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 53 CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................... 54 PART 1 National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) ........................... 54 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 54 Subpart A Miami Dade County ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 56 Emergency Authority ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 56 Disaster Assistance Employee Program ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 56 Use of Miami Dade County Resources ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 56 EOC Activation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 56 EOC Activation Levels ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 57 EOC Structure ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 59 EOC Branches ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................... 60 Municipalities and Municipal Branch EOCs ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 61 Subpar t B State of Florida ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 62 Roles and Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 62 Statewide Assistance ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 63 State Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 63 Subpart C Federal Government ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................... 63 Roles and Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 63 Federal Assistance ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 64 Federal Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 64 PART 2 RESPONSE ACTIONS ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 64 Subpart A Notification and Warning ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 64 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 64 Local Warning Points Primary ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 64 Local Warning Points Secondary ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 65 Warning and Status Updat es ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 65 Turkey Point Warning System ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 66 Special Populations ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 66 Other Notification Procedures ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 66 Subpart B Evacuation and Sheltering ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 66 Sheltering General Population ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 68 Sheltering ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 68 Emergency Evacuation Assistance Program (EEAP) ................................ ................................ ................................ 68 Pet Frien dly Evacuation Centers ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 69 Transportation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 69 Subpart C Needs Assessment ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 69 Preliminary Damage Assessment Teams ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 69 Deployment of Prelimin ary Damage Assessment Teams ................................ ................................ ........................... 70 Subpart D Other ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 70 Mutual Aid ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 70 Facility Life Support Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 71 PART 3 RECOVERY AND MITIGATION ACTI ONS ................................ ................................ ...................... 71 General Recovery Functions ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 71 Transition from Response to Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 72 Short Term Recovery Phase ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 72 Disaster Declaration ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 73 Non Declared Disaster Event ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 74 Long Term Recovery Phase ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 74 Recovery Activities of the EOC Human Services and EOC Infrastructure Branches ................................ ............ 75 Ha zard Mitigation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 78 RESPONSIBILITIES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 79 PART 1 LOCAL GOVERNMENT, AGENCIES AND PARTNERS ................................ ................................ .. 79 Miami Dade County Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 80 Partner Agencie s and Others ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 90 Private Not for Profit (PNP) & Commercial Organizations ................................ ................................ ..................... 95 Vital Records Maintenance ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 99

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 4 of 237 PART 2 MIAMI DADE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT ................................ ................................ ............... 99 CEMP Maintenance ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 99 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 100 PREPAREDNESS ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 100 PART 1 TRAINING ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 100 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 100 Roles ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 100 Programs ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 101 PART 2 EXERCISES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 101 Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 101 Procedures ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 101 PART 3 PUBLI C AWARENESS AND EDUCATION ................................ ................................ .................... 102 Subpart A General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 102 Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 102 Programs ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 102 Subpart B Disseminating Public Information ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 102 Emergency Public Information ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 102 Refuges of Last Resort ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 103 GIS Maps Evacuation Areas ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 103 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 103 PART 1 INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 103 Authority ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 103 PART 2 PROCEDURES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 104 APPENDICES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 105 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 1 (TRANSPORTATION) ................................ ................................ ..... 106 Part 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 106 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 106 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 106 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 106 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 106 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 106 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 107 Part 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 107 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 107 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 107 Com munication Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 108 ESF 1 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 108 Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 108 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 109 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 109 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 109 Transportation Requests ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 110 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 2 (COMMUNICATIONS) ................................ ................................ ... 110 Part 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 110 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 110 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 111 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 111 Part 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 111 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 111 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 112 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 113 Communication Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 113 ESF 2 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 113 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 114 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 114 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 114

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 5 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 3 (PUBLIC WORKS & ENGINEERING) ................................ ........... 115 Part 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 115 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 115 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 115 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 115 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 115 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 115 Part 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 116 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 116 Organiza tion ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 116 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 117 Communication Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 117 ESF 3 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 117 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 117 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 118 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 4 (FIREFIGHTING) ................................ ................................ ............. 118 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 118 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 118 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 118 Sup port Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 118 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 118 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 119 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 119 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 119 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 119 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 120 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 120 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 120 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 5 (PLANNING) ................................ ................................ .................... 121 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 121 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 121 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 121 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 121 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 121 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 121 P olicies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 121 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 1 22 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 122 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 122 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 123 ESF 5 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 123 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 123 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 124 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 124 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 6 (MASS CARE) ................................ ................................ .................. 125 PAR T 1 GENERAL ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 125 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 125 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 125 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 125 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 126 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 126 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 126 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 126 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 126 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 126 Communication Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 128 ESF 6 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 128 Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 128

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 6 of 237 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 128 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 129 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 129 Non emergency Activities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 130 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 7 (RESOURCE SUPPORT) ................................ ................................ 130 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 130 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 130 Lead Agen cy ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 130 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 130 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 131 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 131 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 132 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 132 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 132 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 132 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 133 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 133 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 8 (HEALTH AND M EDICAL) ................................ ............................ 134 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 134 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 134 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 134 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 134 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 134 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 135 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 135 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 136 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 136 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 137 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 137 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 138 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 138 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 9 (URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE) ................................ ................ 139 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 139 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 139 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 139 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 139 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 139 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 139 P ART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 140 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 140 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 140 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 142 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 143 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 143 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 10 (HAZARDOUS MATERIALS) ................................ ...................... 143 PART 1 GENERAL ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 143 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 143 Response Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 143 Recovery Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 143 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 144 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 144 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 144 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 144 PART 2 Conc ept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 144 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 144 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 144 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 145

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 7 of 237 Communication Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 145 EME RGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 11 (FOOD & WATER) ................................ ................................ ......... 145 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 145 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 145 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 145 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 145 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 14 6 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 146 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 146 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 147 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 147 Noti fication and Alert ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 147 ESF 11 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 147 Resource Support ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 147 Mass Care ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 147 Transportation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 148 Responsi bilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 148 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 149 Recovery and Deactivation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 150 Non Emergency Activities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 151 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 12 (ENERGY) ................................ ................................ ...................... 152 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 152 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 152 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 152 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 152 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 152 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 152 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 152 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 153 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 153 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 153 Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 154 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 155 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 155 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 155 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 13 (MILITARY SUPPORT) ................................ ................................ 157 PART 1 GENERAL ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 157 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 157 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 157 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 157 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 157 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 157 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 157 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 159 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 159 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 159 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 159 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 159 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 159 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 159 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 14 (PUBLIC INFORMATION) ................................ ............................ 160 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 160 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 160 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 160 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 160 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 160 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 161 Polici es ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 161

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 8 of 237 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 162 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 162 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 162 Communications ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 163 ESF 14 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 163 311 ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 163 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 163 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 164 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 164 Recovery Assistance ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 164 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 15 (VOLUNTEERS & DONATIONS) ................................ ................ 165 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 165 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 165 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 165 Support Age ncies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 165 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 165 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 165 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 165 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 166 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 166 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 166 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 166 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 167 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 167 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 169 EMERG ENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 16 (LAW ENFORCEMENT) ................................ ............................... 169 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 169 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 169 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 170 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 170 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 170 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 170 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 170 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 170 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 170 Organiza tion ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 171 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 171 Communication Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 171 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 17 (ANIMAL PROTECTION) ................................ ............................. 171 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 171 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 171 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 172 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 172 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 172 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 172 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 173 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 173 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 173 Notification and Alert ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 173 ESF 17 Interface ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 173 Responsibilities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 173 Preparation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 174 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 174 Recovery and Deactivation ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 175 Non Emergency Activities ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 175 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 18 (B USINESS & R ECOVERY ) ................................ ................................ 175 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 175 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 175

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 9 of 237 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 176 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 176 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 176 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 176 Policies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 177 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 177 Organization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 177 Notification and Alert ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 177 Direction and Control ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 177 Information Gathering and Dissemination ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 177 Resource Support ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 178 De mobilization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 178 EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER LOGISTICS PLAN ................................ ................................ ............ 179 PART 1 General ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 179 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 179 Lead Agency ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 179 Support Agencies ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 179 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 179 Scope ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 179 PART 2 Concept of Operations ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 180 Alert & Notification ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 180 Response ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 180 Recovery ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 180 Demobilization ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 181 ATTACHMENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 182 Figure 1 Proposed Population Projections ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 183 Figure 2 Annual Average Change ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 184 Figure 3 Minor Statistical Areas ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 185 Figure 4 2010 Demographic and Housing Characteristics ................................ ................................ ..................... 186 Figure 5 Communit y Profile ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................... 191 Figure 6 Percent Population with Disability ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 192 Figure 7 Average Assessed Values by Municipality ................................ ................................ .............................. 194 Figure 8 Map of Populated Coastline ................................ ................................ ................................ .................. 195 Figure 9 Classification of Events ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 196 Figure 10 Miami Dade EOC Activation Levels ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 198 Figure 11 Inmate Population ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 199 Figure 12 Transi ent Population ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 199 Figure 13 Miami Dade EOC Organizational Chart ................................ ................................ ................................ 200 Figure 14 Population Evacuation Estimates (Hurricane) ................................ ................................ ....................... 202 Figure 15 Miami Dade County Canal Systems ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 203 Figure 17 Description of Evacuation Regions ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 204 Figure 18 Evacuation Clearance Times of 90% of the Affected Populations (Turkey Point ) ................................ ...... 206 Figure 19 Storm Surge Planning Zones ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 207 Figure 20 Miami Dade Mobile Home Parks ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 208 Figure 21 Miami Dade Marinas ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 209 Figure 23 2012 Hurricane Evacuation Centers ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 212 Figure 27 Moveable Bridges ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 216 Figure 28 Miami Dade County and Municipal Fire Stations ................................ ................................ ................... 217 Figure 29 Miami Dade County and Municipal Police Stations ................................ ................................ ................ 218 Figure 30 Miami Dade County Hospitals ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 219 Figure 31 Miami Dade County Primary Evacuation Routes ................................ ................................ ................... 220 Figure 32 Promulgation Letter ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 221

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 10 of 237 REC ORD OF CHANGES Date Description of Change Page or Section 3/25/13 Revised Storm Surge Planning Map 208 3/25/13 Revised Evacuation Route Map 221 4/18/ 1 3 Addition of NDMS description 67 6/28/13 Promulgation Letter Added 221

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 12 of 237 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Miami Dade County is vulnerable to a v ariety of hazards that threaten its communities businesses and the environment. The Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan 1 (CEMP) establishes the framework to e nsure that Miami Dade County and its municipalities are prepared to deal with these hazards. The Plan ou tlines the roles and responsibilit ies of the local government, state and federal agencies and volunteer organiz ations. The CEMP coordinates the activities of these groups under the Emergency Support Fun c tion (ESF) System with a designated lead agency for a comprehensive approach to pla n ni ng, response, and recovery from identified hazards. The NIMS/ICS principles have been incorporated and institutionalized into the Cou nout this doc u ment and in the policies and procedures s response agencies. The CEMP outlines the basic strategies, assumptions, operational goals and objectives, and mechanisms through which Miami Dade County will mobilize resources and conduct activities to guide and support eme rgency management efforts thr ough preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation. This is an o p erations based plan that addresses evacuation; sheltering, post disaster response and recovery; deployment of r esources; communications and warning systems. The Plan calls for annual exer cise to d e termine the ability of the local government and its municipalities to respond to eme r gencies. Throughout the CEMP volumes the FEMA Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101 as well as the Whole of Community approach which incorporates collabora tive efforts of emergency management, residents, vulnerable populations, organizational and community leaders, and government officials is utilized in the d evelopment of Standard Operating Procedures and Hazard Specific P lans T he Americans with Dis a bilit ies Act of 1990 as amended and the Guidance on Planning for Functional N eeds Support Services in General Popul ation Shelters are also highly referenced in all plan development processes The Plan is comprised of three volumes. The first volume is divided into two sections: The Basic Plan and the Emergency Support Function s Appendix. The appendix is a brief description of each ESF. The second vo lume contains detailed Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for each ESF including corresponding a n nexes and the third volume contains the Hazard Specific Annexes. Volume I The Basic Plan This section outlines the different hazards Miami Dade County and its municipal ities are at risk or vulnerable to. It includes areas such as the concept of operation, directi on and control, r esponsibilities of all agencies and resources mobilized by the County to assist in the preparation, r e sponse and recovery from a disaster, the responsibilities of different levels of government and financial management pol icies that will b e adhered to in an emergency. The Basic Plan also contain s a section that addresses recovery issues to ensure a rapid and orderly impl e mentation of rehabilitation and restoration programs for persons and property affected by a disaster. 1 As authorized by Chapter 252, Part I, Florida Statutes

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 13 of 237 Volume II T he Emergency Support Function SOPs This section organizes Miami Dade County depar tments and agencies into 1 8 Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) T he emergency support function stru c ture is patterned after the system outlined in the State of Florida Comp rehensive Emergency Management Plan and the National Response Framework Each of the 1 8 ESFs in this section outlines the pu r pose and scope of each function, the operating policies, planning assumptions, concept of operations, and respons i bilities of lead and supporting agencies involved in each. The 1 8 ESFs and the lead departments and agencies are listed below: Title Lead Agency 1 Transportation Miami Dade Trans it 2 Communications Miami Dade Information Technology 3 Public Works and Engineer ing Miami Dade Public Works and Waste Management 4 Firefighting Miami Dade Fire Rescue 5 Planning and Intelligence Miami Dade Emergency Management 6 Mass Care American Red Cross South Florida Region 7 Resource Support Miami Dade Internal Services 8 Health and Medical Services Miami Dade County Health D e partment 9 Urban Search and Rescue Miami Dade Fire Rescue 10 Hazardous Materials Miami Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources 11 Food and Water Miami Dade Emergency Management 12 Energy Miami Dade Emergency Management 13 Military Support Florida National Guard 14 Public Information Office of Communic a tions 15 Volunteer and Donations United Way of Miami 16 Law Enforcement Miami Dade Police 17 Animal Protection Miami Dade Animal Se rvices 18 Business & Industry Miami Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Volume III The Hazard Specific Annexes This volume contains hazard specific plans that are comprehe nsive in scope. They address hazards in Miami Dade County and its municip alities that require an e n hanced or modified approach to dealing with that particular hazard. It consists of six annexes: 1. Annex A Miami Dade County Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan The Turkey Point Plan ide no radiological incidents at the Turkey Point nuclear power plant. This annex pr ovides guidance for command and control, protective action decision making and recovery and reentry in the event of an emergency as well as preparedness and mitigation practice s. 2. Annex B Miami Dade County Terroris m Response Plan The Terroris m Response Plan identifies the protective actions, public information sha ring and response and recovery in the event of an eme r gency and focuses primarily on consequence management for terrorist incidents.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 14 of 237 3. Annex C Miami Dade County Change in Caribbean Government Plan to the Caribbean inc reases its vulnerability to mass migration to and from the Caribbean. The Change in Ca rr ized persons due to a change in gover n ment. The Plan also addresses celebrations, demonst rations and acts of terrorism that ma y occur in the County due to these changes. 4. Annex D Miami Dade County Evacuation and Re Entry Plan T he process of evacuation may i m pact the normal activities of our county and its municipalities. Therefore, a coordinated plan is required to a s sure that a safe and effective evacuation can be implemented in all of the affected areas. This Plan defines the proc edures to be utilized by state, county and municipal agencies that are involved with the impleme n tation of an evacuation within M i ami Dade County 5. Annex E Miami Dade County Recovery Plan Disaster recovery can present costly and complex restor ation and rebuilding challenges for every community. The responsibility to a s sure that the community is able to n ment. 6. Annex F. Miami Dade County Logistics Plan The EOC Logistics Section Plan supports the operations of the Miami Dade County Emergency Operations Center by identifying the procedures for a cquiring, deploying, tracking, and d e mobilizing equipment, supplies, and human resources.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 15 of 237 BASIC PLAN I NTRODUCTION The Miami Dade County Comprehensive Eme r hazards threat s to the Cou nty Essentially, t he magnitude of an incident or disaster governs the a p proach used in processing an event. It has been noted that the Emergency Support Function (ESF) sy s tem is very effective when handling small and large scale incidents requiring resp onse and recovery su p port from local, state and federal gover n ment E nsuring the safety of all Miami responsibility and effort b etween first responders, Miami Dade Emergency Management ( M DEM ) and county gov ernment. M i ami Dade County is divided into 36 jurisdictions; 35 municipalities each s upp orted by its own local gover n ing body and an unincorporated area Each municipal government is independently responsible for the safety of its res idents and visitors; with mutual aid support from the County. In the event of a countywide emergency declaration, the corp o rate resources of the County and each of its municipalities work together for the m u tual benefit of all residents and visitors of Miami Dade County. Th e statutory authority for this arrangement may be found in Chapter 8B of the Miami Dade County Code. State support is governed under Florida Statute, Chapter 252. In turn, the federal government is respo nsible for support to both the s tate and local gove rnment in accordance with the Robert T. Stafford Act and Title 44 Emergency Management and Assistance of the Code of Federal Regul a tion (CFR) On March 30, 2011, Presidential Policy Directive 8: National Preparedness (PPD 8) was signed and r e leased by t he Office of the President of the United States. PPD 8 and its component policies intend to guide how the nation, from federal state, and local governments i gate the effects of, respond to, and recov These threats include terrorist acts, natural disasters, and other man made inc i dents. PPD 8 evolves from, and supersedes, Homeland Security Presidential Directive 8. PPD 8 is i n tended to meet many requirements of Subtitle C of the Post Katrina Emergency Reform Act of 2006 (P.L. 109 295, 6 U.S.C. §741 764). The National Preparedness Goal s describes the Nation s security and resilience posture through the core c apabilities utilizing the Whole of Community approach as the foundation. The National Preparedness Goals defines success as: A secure and resilient Nation with the capabilities required across the whole community to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose the grea t est risk. Using the core capabilities, the National Preparedness Goal s are achieved by: Preventing, avoiding, or stopping a threatened or an actual act of terrorism. Protecting our citizens, residents, visitors, and assets against the greatest threats and hazards in a ma nner that allows our interests, aspirations, and way of life to thrive. Mitigating the loss of life and property by lessening the impact of future disasters.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 16 of 237 Responding quick ly to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic human needs in the aftermath of a catastrophic incident. Recovering through a focus on the timely restoration, strengthening, and revitalization of infrastru c ture, housing, and a susta inable economy, as well as the health, social, cultural, historic, and environmental fabric of communities affected by a catastrophic incident. P URPOSE The Miami Dade CEMP is intended to provide an organized system of preparedness, response, and reco v ery by which the Mayor County Manager, and the Board of County Commissioners are guided in the ir sta t utory responsibilities in the provi sion of direc tion and control during a disas ter. This p lan has been designed to achieve a nu m ber of goals: 1. To provide an organized system of hazard vulnerability reduction to the citizens of and visitors to M i ami Dade County. 2. To develop an enhanced level of awareness relative to emergency preparedness, throughout the popul ation at large. 3. To provide the most efficient r e spon se and recovery system possible through effective coordination and maximum utilization of all available resources. 4. To coordinate the return of essential services to a normal state as quickly and effectively as possible after a disaster. 5. To maintain a high level of readiness through community outreach and regular M DEM training. 6. e gies, particularly in the areas of critical i n frastructure, land use, and buildin g codes. S COPE The Miami Dade CEMP establishes official emergency management policy for all county agencies and muni cipalities in response to, and recovery from, emergencies and disasters within the County Each entity ident ified herein will utilize this CEMP as the basis for development and maintenance of subordinate plans, r esponse policies, and implementing procedures. The existence of this CEMP does not relieve response orga nizations or local jurisdictions from the duty of developing their own Standa rd Operating Pr o cedures (SOP). The CEMP establishes official policy for any Miami Dade County municipality that has not obtained official a pproval for use of its own plan or appropriate element thereof. Incorporated areas and municipa lities that have for mally filed a CEMP with the Florida Division of Eme r gency Management under rule 9G 6 and 9G 7 pursuant to chapter 252 of the Florida Statutes, are empo w ered to do so, as long as their CEMP do es not conflict with the County CEMP. The Miami Dade CEMP covers i nor An overview of these categories of disa s ters is found in Figure 10. This CEMP provides Miami Dade County w ith a uniform protocol for the esta b lishment and maintenance of a coordinated interface with the Federal and State Governments private and non profit sectors, and faith based organizations during emergency periods. The CEMP and all associated volumes

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 17 of 237 emb race the Whole of Community approach utilizing all available resources to ensure the most efficient r esponse to incidents that impact Miami Dade Cou nty. CEMP MAINTENANCE The Miami Dade CEMP was produced through the group efforts of Miami Dade Emergency Ma nagement staff, virtually every county and municipal agency, and many private organizations. In add i tion, the staff of the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management ( F DEM) provided invaluable aid throughout the develo pment of this plan. The Miami Dade CEMP has been formulated in an effort to provide the flex i bility required to efficiently handle both large and small incidents and disasters. A CEMP distribution list is maintained and up dated semi annually by Miami Dade Emergency Manag e ment Revisi ons to the CEMP fall into two categories: 1. Time sensitive revisions that are distri b uted to all manual holders as necessary 2. Non time sensitive revisions that are issued on an annual basis. HSEEP C OMPLIANCE AND PLAN IMPROVEMENT MDEM conducts tabletop and f unctional exercises as well as annual full scale exercises (e.g. Statewide Hurr icane Exercise, Radiological Emergency Preparedness Exercises, etc.) to test the responsiveness and capabi lity of Miami Dade County. Each exercise will test all or critical por tions of the CEMP, including c a pabilities of equipment and the personnel to operate such equipment. Each exercise is evaluated through interviews of participating partner organizations following the exercise and adopted into an After Action Report (AAR). R evisions will be made to the appropriate plans based on the AAR findings. MDEM is compliant with the requirements of the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) which is a capabilities and performance based exercise program which provi des a standardized pol icy, methodology, and terminology for exercise design, development, conduct, evaluation, and improv e ment planning. HSEEP compliance is defined as adherence to specific processes and practices for exercise pr ogram management and exerc ise design, development, conduct, evaluation, and improvement planning. MDEM complies with the four HSEEP perfo r mance requirements. These requirements are as follows: 1. Conduct an annual Training and Exercise Planning Workshop and maintain a Multiyear Tra ining and E xercise Plan. 2. Plan and conduct exercises in accordance with the guidelines set forth in HSEEP policy. 3. Develop and submit properly formatted After Action Report/Improvement 4. Plans (AAR/IP).Track and implement corrective actions identified in the AAR/IP. 11

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 18 of 237 AUTHORITIES AND REFERENCES PART 1 A U THORITIES AND REFERNCES Codified Responsibilities The Miami Dade County Office of Emergency Management was established in 1968 pursuant to cha p ter 252 of the Florida Statutes. Miami Dade EM is charged with t he responsibility of reducing the vulner a bility of the people of Miami Dade County relative to disasters both natural and tec h nological. Memoranda and References Miami Dade EM is assembling a library of the CEMPs of municipalities, cities, villages and age ncies throug hout the County. The CEMP library will be reviewed for compatibility with the County CEMP and up dated with revisions as the issuing agency or municipality supplies them. Similarly, all Standard Operating Procedures and specific plans as refe renced throughout the different sections of the CEMP are maintained in the M DEM library, r e viewed annually, and up dated as required. Miami Dade County and all its municipalities are all signatories to the Florida Statewide Mutual Aid Pact. N umerous inte r and intra county Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with jurisdictions in Miami Dade Cou nty exist between the municipalities, departments, organizations, and counties that make up the Se c tions and ESFs. Memorandums of Understanding address varying spec ific hazards such as terrorism, mass migration, radiological emergency preparedness, and tropical storms. The Local Mitigation Strategy also maintains agreements with its municipal partners. In addition, all acute care facilities, voluntary organizations and fire d e Americans with Disabilities Act and Guidelines for Functional Needs Support Se rvices (FNSS) The Americans with Disabilities Act (AD A) of 1990 is incorporated into MDEM emergency preparedness plans. This law prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. A best practice used to effectively address the needs of persons with disabilities or access and functional needs in emergency preparedness plans is esta blishing a process to pre identify res ources which may be used to fulfill requests from these individuals for re asonable accommodations they may need in eme r gency situations. Functional Needs Support Services (FNSS) are defined as services that enable children and adults with or without disab ilities who have access and functional needs to maintain their health, safety, and indepen d ence in a general population shelter. This may include augmentation of trained medical professionals, durable me dical equipment (DME), consumable medical equipment (CME), and reasonable modification to common pra ctices, policies and procedures. Individuals requiring FNSS may have sensory, physical, mental health, cogn itive and/or intellectual disabilities affecting their capability to function independently without assistance. Add itionally, the elderly, women in the late stages of pregnancy, and individuals requiring communication assi stance and bariatric support may also benefit from FNSS. On July 22, 2004, Executive Order 13347 was issued (Individuals with Disabil ities in Emergency Prepare dness), directing the federal government to work together with state, local and tribal governments, as well as private organizations, to appropriately address the safety and sec u rity needs of people with disabilities.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 19 of 237 Miami Dade C ounty will make every effort to comply with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other applicable laws related to emergency and disaster related programs, services and activities for ind ividuals with disabilities and access and functio nal needs. Miami Dade County The Office of Emergency Management was established by ordinance in 1968 (Section 8B, Miami Dade Cou nty Code) to discharge civil defense responsibilities and functions as defined in and pr o vided for by Chapter 252, Florida Statu tes (F.S.). 1. Miami Dade Airport Emergency Plan 2. Miami Dade Coordinated Damage Assessment Plan 3. Miami Dade Coordinated Debris Clearance and Removal Plan 4. Miami Dade Disaster Assistance Center SOP 5. Miami Dade Disaster Assistance Employee SOP 6. Miami Dade Fire Rescue Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan 7. Miami Dade Points of Distribution Plan 8. Miami Dade Post Disaster Housing Plan 9. Miami Dade Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan 10. Miami Dade Unmet Needs Plan State of Florida 1. Florida Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan 2. Florida Emergency Response Team Mass Migration Annex The State of Florida emergency management laws are established in Chapter 252, F.S., Emergency Ma nagement Act. Other State authorities and references include: Florida Statues 1. Chapter 14, F.S., Governor 2. Chapter 22, F.S., Emergency Continuity of Government 3. Chapter 23, F.S., Florida Mutual Aid Act 4. Chapter 154, F.S., Public Health Facilities 5. Chapter 161, F.S., Beach and Shore Preservation 6. Chapter 187, F.S., State Comprehensive Plan 7. Chapte r 245, F.S., Disposition of Dead Bodies 8. Chapter 38 1 F.S., Public Health 9. Chapter 395, F.S., Hospital Licensing and Regulation 10. Chapter 401, F.S., Medical Telecommunications and Transportation 11. Chapter 553, F.S., Building Construction Standards 12. Chapter 870 F.S., Riots, Affrays, Routs, and Unlawful Assemblies 13. Chapter 943, F.S., Domestic Security Florida Administrative Code 1. Chapter 27P 2 27P 6 27P 11, 27P 14, 27P 19, 27P 20, and 27P 21 Florida Administrative Code

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 20 of 237 2. Chapter 73C 40 Florida Administrative Cod e Executive Orders 1. Executive Order No. 80 29, "Disaster Prepa r edness" 2. Executive Order 05 122, State Emergency Response Commission Federal Government 1. Department of Homeland Security Caribbean Mass Migration Framework 2. Department of Homeland Security Mariti me Migration Plan 3. U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Response Operations Plan 4. U.S. Coast Guard Southeast Florida Area Maritime Security Plan 5. U.S. Coast Guard Operation Vigilant Sentry Plan 6. U.S. Coast Guard Southeast Florida Area Contingency Plan Federal emergency management authorities and re f erences include: 1. Public Law 93 288, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 5121, et seq., the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief Act and Emergency Assistance Act, provides authority for response and recovery assistance under the Federal Respo nse Plan. This legislation empowers the President to direct any federal agency to utilize its author ities and resources in support of state and local a s sistance efforts. 2. Public Law 81 3. Executive Order 11795 dated July 11, 1974, as amended by Executive Order 11910, dated April 13, 1976. 4. Americans w ith Disabilities Act of 1990 as A mended PART 2 MIAMI DADE COUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCE: CHAPTER 8B EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT The following is the amended Miami Dade County Code of Ordinances Chapter 8B adopted by the Board of County Commissioners on July 22, 2003, (Ordinance 03 178). Section 1. Chapter 8 : Miami Dade County Code is hereby amended as follows: Chapter 8B EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT State law references: E mergency management, Florida Statutes § 252. Editor's note: Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, adopted May 25, 1999, amended chapter 8B, § 8B 1 -8B 12, in its entir e ty. Former chapter 8B pertained to Civil Defense and derived from Ord. No. 68 79, § 3 -6, 8, adopted D e c ember 17, 1968. Section 8B 1. Establishment :

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 21 of 237 Pursuant to F.S. 252, there is hereby established the Miami Dade County Office of Emergency Manag e ment, the operation of which shall be the responsibility of the County Mayor The duties of the O f fice of Eme rgency Management shall be to provide for the effective direction, control and coordination of Miami Dade County government disaster management services, functional units, and personnel, and provide co l laboration with other governments and the private sect or, in compliance with the Miami Dade County Comprehensive Eme rgency Manag e ment Plan. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 2. Definitions : When used in Chapter 8B the following terms shall have the meanings set forth below: (1) The Board of Count y Commissioners is the elected legislative body representing all residents of Miami Dade County and shall herein be referred to as the "Board". 2) The County Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of Miami Dade County and shall herein be r e ferred to as the "Manager". (3) The Director of the Office of Emergency Management is the Miami Dade County official who will ex e cute the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan in Miami Dade County and shall herein be r e ferred to as the "Director". (4) Disaster s hall be defined as any natural or man made incident that disrupts or damages the social or ec onomic systems or infrastructure of the community and which is so severe that a Local State of Eme r gency is declared. (5) Emergency shall be defined as any incide nt, natural or manmade, that disrupts or threatens to disrupt, the social or economic systems or infrastructure of the community in such a manner as to warrant a response a ction but does not warrant the declaration of Local State of Emergency. (6) The Exe cutive Mayor is the elected Chief Executive Officer of Miami Dade County and shall herein be r eferred to as the "Mayor." (7) Dade County Office of Emergency Management p ursuant to Florida Statutes § 252.38. The Plan establis h es the framework through which Miami Dade County prepares for, responds to, recovers from, and mit i gates the impacts of a wide variety of disasters that could adversely affect the health, safety and/ or general we l fare of the residents of Miami Dade County. The Plan provides guidance to Miami Dade County and local officials on procedures, organization, and responsibilities, as well as provides for an integrated and coordinated local, State and fede ral response. The Plan establishes a method of operation that spans the dire c tion and control of an emergency from initial monitoring through post disaster response, recovery, and mit i gation. (8) ospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and long term care facilities pursuant to Flo r ida Statutes § 395.002 and § 400.0060.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 22 of 237 (9) (10) hall herein be referred to as the M i ami Dade Emergency Management." (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) established, s e cured, and protected facility from which Miami Dade Coun ty coordinates, monitors, and directs countywide emerge ncy response and recovery activities during a threat of, or an actual disaster. tment, ag ency or organizational representatives to the EOC in order to initiate the Plan so as to fun c tionally prepare, mitigate, respond and r e cover from an incident or disaster. ed primary respons i bility by the Director to manage and coordinate a specific function pursuant to the Plan. Lead agencies are desi gnated on the basis of their having the most authorities, resources, capabilities, or expertise relative to the a ccomplishme nt of the specific function. Lead Agencies will be responsible for maintenance of sections of the Plan related to their assigned function. Department Dade County employee whose job fun ction(s) is crit ations within Miami Dade County. As such, the absence or non negatively impacts the d e partment or agency from providing its mission(s) prescribed in the Plan. EOC Dade County employee whose job fun c tion(s) is a tions wi thin Miami Dade County. As such, these employees have a pre ss the DAEs are activated by the Logi s tics Section of the Emergency Operations Center. Section 8B 3. Ter ritorial limits for performance of fun c tions: The Office of Emergency Management shall perform civil defense, mitigation, preparedness, disaster r esponse, and recovery functions within the territorial limits of Miami Dade County including incorporated mun i cipalities, and, in addition, shall conduct such functions outside of such territorial limits as may be required pu rsuant to the provisions of Chapter 252, Florida Statutes, and in accordance with State and M i ami Dade County comprehensive emergency manage ment pla n ning. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 4. Powers of the Board of County Commissioners: The Board accepts all powers vested in the Office of Emergency Management as created by and defined in Chapter 252, Florida St a tutes.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 23 of 237 (1) Conduct o f Board business in event of a disaster or emergency: If, due to a disaster or emergency as d efined herein, it becomes impossible to conduct the affairs of Miami Dade County government at regular or usual places, the Board, as the legislative body of Miami Dade County, may meet upon the call of the Chai rperson at any place within the territorial limits of Miami Dade County. If relocation is required due to the e ffects of a disa s ter or emergency, the affairs of the Board shall be lawfully conducted at tempo rary location(s) until normal facilities can be restored. This section does not in any way dismiss the Board's r e sponsibilities under the Florida State Open Government Sunshine Act, as amended. All reasonable a t tempts must be made to comply with the requ irements of Florida Statutes 286.011. (2) Termination of a Local State of Emergency: If a Local State of Emergency has been declared by the Mayor or the Chairperson of the Board of County Commissioners in the absence of the Mayor and exceeds thirty (30) d ays, the Board can terminate the Declaration of a Local Stat e of Emergency by a two thirds (2/3) m ajority vote of those present. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 5 Procedure for adoption of ordinances and regulations during disasters or eme r gen cies: Upon affirmation by the Mayor or the Chairperson of the Board of County Commissioners in the a b sence of the Mayor that a disaster or emergency exists which will affect the health, safety or welfare of the citizens of Miami Dade County, any such ordi nance or regulation adopted and promulgated because of such disa s ter or emergency shall become enforceable immediately upon promulgation. A copy shall be filed with the Clerk of the Circuit Court as Clerk of the Miami Dade County Commission within twenty four (24) hours of its promulg ation. Upon failure to file the ordinance or regulation within twenty four (24) hours, such ordinance or regulation shall not be deemed to have been adopted b e cause of a disaster or emergency and shall have no effect until fi led in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court as Clerk of the Miami Dade County Commission within a p eriod of fifteen (15) days as heretofore pr o vided. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 2, 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 6. Powers of the Mayor: Pursuant to the Code and F lorida State law, and to execute the policies and purposes of this Chapter, the Mayor, or the Chairperson of the Board of County Commissioner in the absence of the Mayor is authorized to: (1) Declare a Local State of Emergency: The Mayor or the Chairperso n of the Board of County Commi s sioners in the absence of the Mayor may declare a Local State of Emergency for a period of up to thirty (30) days for any or all areas of Miami Dade County in response to the imminent threat of, or an occurring emergency or d isaster. The Mayor or the Chairperson of the Board of County Commissioners in the a b sence of the Mayor must present to the Board an affidavit stating the reasons for the Declar a tion. (a) If the Declaration is to exceed thirty (30) days the Mayor, or the C hairperson of the Board of County Co mmission ers in the absence of the Mayor shall present to the Board an additional affidavit stating the re asons for the exte n sion. (b) A Local State of Emergency may be terminated by executive order once conditions that prompted the de claration are no longer a threat. (2) Ensure the coordination of Local, State, or Federal agencies, and private entities to facilitate disaster or emergency operations.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 24 of 237 (3) The Mayor shall be the official representative of Miami Dade County and speak on behalf of its a c tions in response to disasters or emergencies. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 7 Duties of the County Ma yo r: The Ma yor shall be responsible for the overall emergency management function in Miami Dade County, and keep the Board a d vised of any actions. (1) The Ma yor may mobilize any or all functional parts of Miami Dade County government, take special a c tions and put in place all appropriate regulations that will protect the lives and property of the citizens of Mi ami Dade County. (2) Once a Local State of Emergency has been declared, the Ma yor is authorized by the Board to order any or all of the following actions: (a) Employee Recall Order: An order recalling M i ami Dade County employees from vacation, canceling d ays off, and mobilizing all personnel r e quired for disaster response; (b) Authorize the Internal Services Department to suspend normal leasing and bid procedures to procure space, structures or other items under their normal authority for disaster response determined nece s sary; (c) Authorize procurement of supplies, equipment, and services without formal bidding proc e dures; (d) Evacuation Order: A mandatory order(s) directing the evacuation of appropriate area(s) of Miami Dade County deemed to be in imminen t danger from disaster; (e) Curfew: In the period before, or during and immediately after an event, an order imposing a general cu r few applicable to Miami Dade County as a whole, or to geographical area(s) of Miami Dade County and during hours the Ma yor de ems necessary, and from time to time, to modify the hours the curfew will be in effect and what area(s) it applies to; (f) An order requiring any or all commercial establishments located in area(s) of imminent or a c tual danger to close and remain closed un til further order; (g) An order requiring the closure of any or all bars, taverns, liquor stores, and other business establis h ments where alcoholic beverages are predominantly sold or otherwise dispensed; provided that with respect to those business establ ishments which are not primarily devoted to the sales of alcoholic be v erages, and in which such alcoholic beverages may be removed or made secure from seizure by the public, the portions thereof utilized for the sale of items other than alcoholic beverages may, at the di s cretion of the Ma yor be allowed to remain open; (h) An order requiring the discontinuance of the sale, distribution or giving away of alcoholic beverages in any or all parts of Miami Dade County; (i) An order requiring the closure of any o r all establishments where firearms and/or ammun i tion are sold or otherwise dispensed; provided that with respect to those business establishments which are not pr i marily devoted to the sale of firearms and/or ammunition, and in which such firearms or ammu nition may be r emoved or made secure from possible seizure by the public, the portions thereof utilized for the sale of items other than firearms and ammunition may, at the discretion of the Manager, be allowed to remain open; (j) An order requiring the di scontinuance of the sale, distribution or giving away of gasoline or other fla m mable liquid or combustible products in any container other than a gasoline tank properly attached to a gas po wered vehicle;

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 25 of 237 (k) An order closing to the public any or all public places including streets, alleys, public ways, schools, parks, beaches, amusement areas and public buildings; (l) In addition to the provisions of Chapter 8A 5 of the Code of Miami Dade County, orders to prevent price gouging for any essential co m modity, dwelling unit, or storage facility; (m) Orders requesting the conservation of water supplies; (n) The Ma yor shall cause any proclamation ordered by the Board pursuant to the authority of this cha p ter to be delivered to all news media within Miami Dade Coun ty, and shall utilize whatever available means to give public notice of such proclamation. (o) Such other orders as are immediately necessary for the protection of life and property; provided, ho w ever that any such orders shall, at the earliest practicabl e time, be presented to the Board for ratification or co nfirmation in a c cordance with this chapter. (3) Appoint a Director of the Office of Emergency Management. (4) The Ma yor will require all Miami Dade County department and agency directors to develop emergency o perations plans, establish staff members who will carry out these plans, represent their agencies during a disa ster or emergency, and will make available to the Office of Emergency Management twenty four (24) hour co ntact information and a syste m of notification of key emplo y ees. (a) The d irectors of all Miami Dade County departments and agencies that are required to report to and fun ction in the EOC as outlined in the Plan, will appoint no less than six (6) staff members who will form the pool o ivation to represent their department or agency or serve as lead agency for a specific function. (b) The directors of all Miami Dade County d e partments and a gencies will designate each staff member as essential or non essential as defined in § 8B 2 (14 9 (1). The dire cEOC EOC o gram. (5) The Ma yor or designee shall present an annual em ergency preparedness report to the Board and the Mayor. This report, to be presented in wri t ing, shall ensure that the Board and the Mayor are informed on the status of the ability of Miami Dade County to prepare for, respond to, and manage disasters and eme r gencies. This report is pursuant to the Citizens' Bill of Rights, Section 10 of the M i ami Dade County Home Rule Charter and F.S. 252. (6) During training or exercises requiring the participation of any or all Miami Dade County departments or agencies it shall be the responsibility of the Manager to ensure appropriate participation by said depar t ments in support of the Plan. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 8. Duties of the Director of the Office of Emergency Management: The Director shall be responsible for the organization, administration and operation of the Office of Eme r gency Management, subject to the direction and control by the Mayor The Director shall coord i nate the activities, services and programs for emergency management and di saster response within M i ami Dade County and shall maintain liaison with other emergency management organiz a tions.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 26 of 237 (1) The Director or designee shall prepare a Co m prehensive Emergency Management Plan and program for the emergency management of Miami Dade C ounty pursuant to F.S. 252, including, but not limited to el ements addressing mitigation activities, preparedness, responses to disasters and emergencies, and r e covery operations and submit the Plan and program to the Director of the Division of Emergency Manag e ment, State of Florida, for review and certification for consistency with the State Comprehensive Emerge n cy Management Plan and compliance with Federal emergency management mandates. (2) The Director or designee shall monitor and advise the Mayor of any and all threats, emergencies, or disa sters that pose a risk to the lives and safety of the residents of Miami Dade County, proposing sol u tions for their decision on how best to protect people and property from imminent danger, or from further da m age. (3) The Director or designee shall procure supplies and equipment, institute training programs, public prepa redness information and education programs, manage and coordinate disaster drills and exercises in accor dance with the Plan. (4) Provision of Shel ter: (a) Public Shelter Manager: In cases of national emergency, or local disaster or emergency as defined herein, the Director or designee, may appoint Shelter Managers, who shall open public shelters; take charge of all stocks of food, water and other su pplies stored in said shelter; admit the public according to Miami Dade County's sheltering plan; and take whatever control measures are necessary for the protection and safety of the occupants. (b) In the event any of the aforementioned public shelters ar e not available or no longer suitable for use as a shelter for whatever reason, the Director or designee may cause to be opened any publicly owned building within Miami Dade County for such use as deemed necessary by the Director or designee. (c) Shelter M anagers are authorized to use re a sonable restraint against those who refuse to cooperate with the routine of shelter living under emergency conditions. Refusal to carry out the orders of the Shelter Manager and appointed staff shall be deemed an offense pu n ishable by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars ($500.00) or imprisonment in Miami Dade County jail of not more than sixty (60) days or by both such fine and imprisonment. (5) The Director or designee shall, in consultation with all municipalitie s, concerned agencies, public util i ties and state offices, develop an evacuation plan for Miami Dade County. This plan should be usable for any or all types of emergencies or disasters. It should coordinate the efforts of all local entities allowing for rapid ex ecution in the face of a sudden disaster. (6) The Director is authorized by the Board to enter into mutual aid agreements in collaboration with other pu blic and private agencies within the State for reciprocal disaster aid and assistance in the ev ent of a di s aster or emergency too great to be dealt with unassisted. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 1, 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 9. County Department Preparedness Plans: To facilitate emergency preparedness planning for Miami Dade County, as required by Florida Statu te 252.38 (1)(a), all Miami Dade County departments, authorities, independent agencies, and constit u tional officers shall

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 27 of 237 prepare and annually review and revise emergency preparedness contingency plans pursuant to directions and guidelines from the Office of Emergency Management. These emergency preparedness contingency plans must identify a baseline of preparedness for a full range of hazard risks and pote n tial emergencies and must establish a comprehensive and effective program that maintains the continu i ty of essential departmental functions during any emergency or other situation that disrupts normal oper a tions Miami Dade County shall ensure that such contingency plans are consistent with the Plan. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) (1) These emergency p reparedness contingency plans shall be submitted to the Office of Emergency Ma nagement by the last day of March each year in an Office of Emergency Management approved fo r mat and shall address the fo l lowing areas: (a) A departmental or agency risk a s sessment a nd vulnerability analysis; (b) Preparedness and mitigation activities including procedures for employees who perform pre event activ ities or shut down critical oper a tions; (c) Operational procedures of the departmental or agency operations center or command post; (d) Direction and control including authorities and responsibilities of key personnel and the chain of command; (e) Communications (primary and back up) sy s tems that will be used to keep employees, on duty and off duty, informed of departmental response activities to coordinate employees in order to carry out depar tmental missions, to keep in contact with customers and suppliers, and to coordinate with the M i ami Dade EOC; (f) Life safety procedures including employee alert and notification, assembly and accountability evacu a tion procedures, e m ployee/family preparedness and welfare; (g) Protection of facilities, equipment, supplies, and vital records; (h) Recovery and restoration of services including employee support, critical asset r e pair/replacement, and the continuity of oper a tions; (i) Operating procedures for documenting departmental or agency emergency personnel, equipment, se rvices, and materials expenditures and for their recovery or reimbursement from appropriate local, state, and federal sources; (j) Public information; (k) Adm inistration and logistics. Section 8B 10. Evacuation of Residential Health Care Facilities (RHCFs): All licensed residential health care facilities (RHCFs) in Miami Dade County will be required to participate in the Miami Dade County RHCF program incorp orated into the Plan under the guidance of the Office of Eme rgency Management.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 28 of 237 (1) RHCFs located in hurricane evacuation zones and that house stretcher bound patients/residents must c oDade Coun ty Stretcher Bound Patient Evacu ation Protocol, referred to in the Plan. (2) RHCFs are required to take part in an annual disaster drill coordinated by the Office of Emergency Ma nagement. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) (3) All companies licensed by Miami Dade County to provide non emergency medical transportation are r equired to participate in the evacuation of RHCFs as instructed by the Office of Emergency Management. Section 8B 11. Volunteers and Disaster Assi s tance Employees: (1) The recruitment, trai ning and use of individuals as volunteer, Disaster Assistance Employees, and auxi l iary emergency preparedness personnel is hereby authorized, and the Director or designee may recruit, train and assign these personnel in accordance with the Plan and as requ ired by the exigencies of a disaster when th ese personnel are used. (2) The Director or designee shall mandate training of county employees, activation and assignment of Disa ster Assistance Employees as required by the exigencies of a disaster. (3) No in dividual receiving instruction as a volu n teer activated to assist under the provisions of this chapter, who is not already a Miami Dade County employee, shall be entitled to receive any benefits, compensation or status as a Miami Dade County employee. (Ord No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 12. Penalties: It is unlawful for anyone to fail or refuse to obey any such order issued by the Mayor, the Board, or the D i rector or their designee pursuant to this chapter. Anyone convicted of a violation of this section is punish a ble by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars ($500.00) or by imprisonment for not more than one hundred and eighty (180) days, or both. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 13. Emergency Operations Center Management: (1) The Director or designee will activate the Miami Dade EOC in anticipation of, or in response to, a disa s ter. Pursuant to 8B 7(4) (a), assigned departmental or agency staff members will respond to the EOC when act ivated. Department directors will ensure that the Office of Emergency Management is maintained with acc urate 24 hour contact information for each of these staff members and ensure that appropr i ate staff reports to the EOC in a timely manner, upon activation. The Office of Emergency Management will a s sist directors to train the staff representatives in their role and function. (2) The Director or designee is responsible for the constant readiness of the Miami Dade EOC and the alert and notification of all representatives for the activation of the Mia mi Dade EOC. (3) In accordance with the Plan, private agencies or organizations may be required by the Director to serve in the Miami Dade EOC and provide a representative to the Miami Dade EOC. These agencies or organ i zations

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 29 of 237 will appoint no less than s esentatives that will be assigned to report to the EOC upon activation to represent their agency or organization or serve as lead agency for a specific function. Agency or organization directors will ensure that the Office of Emergency Management is maintained with accurate 24 hour contact information for each of these staff me mbers and ensure that appropriate staff reports to the EOC in a timely manner, upon act i vation. Th e Office of Emergency Management will assist directors to train the staff represent a tives in their role and function.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 30 of 237 Section 8B 14 Municipal/Divisional Emergency O p erations Centers: (1) In accordance with the Plan, all incorporated municipalities within the boundaries of Miami Dade County will be organized into divisions, determined by the Office Emergency Management. (2) One municipality within each division will be designated by the Director as a Divisional Emergency Oper ations Center and will be requ ired to send a representative to the Miami Dade EOC upon activation. (3) When requested by the Director, each Divisional EOC will activate their municipal EOC facility, send a trained representative to the Miami Dade EOC, and take whatever actions are nece ssary to mitigate the e ffects of, assist in the r e sponse to, or recovery from, a disaster. (4) Once the Director activates the Divisional EOCs, their subordinate municipalities are required to make r equests in accordance with the Plan. Section 8B 15 Pla nning related to Special Facil i ties: (1) Special facilities are those institutions or organizations whose populations are dependent upon the instit ution for transportation. (2) Special facilities are required to have a plan in place to be self sufficient in an emergency that would r equire evacuation of their facility due to a natural or technological disaster. (3) These institutions include, but are not limited to assisted living facilities, schools (public and pr i vate), day care centers, elderly centers or other organizations. (4) The Plan will include provisions to allow these institutions to incorporate within their plans the use of rece ption centers, alert and notification and fa m ily reunification services. Section 2 If any section, subsection, sen tence, clause or provision of this ordinance is held invalid, the r emainder of this ordinance shall not be a f fected by such invalidity. Section 3. It is the intention of the Board of County Commissioners, and it is hereby ordained that the prov isions of this ordinance, including any sunset provision, shall become and be made a part of the Code of M iami Dade County, Florida. The sections of this ordinance may be renumbered or re lettered to acco m plish Section 4. This ordinance shall become effective ten (10) days after the date of enactment unless vetoed by the Mayor, and if vetoed, shall become effective only upon an override by the Board. Section 5 This ordinance does not contain a su n set provision.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 31 of 237 SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS Situation The primary mission of emergency management in Miami Dade County is to support our community's di s aster preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation needs thro ugh the coordination of information and r eto Miami Dade County. The Miami Dade County Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) i ami Dade. The THIRA is the main hazard assessment for disaster planning and is recognized as the ha z ard assessment section of the CEMP. PART 1 HAZARD ANALYSIS Ge neral Profile Miami Dade County is located on the southeast coast of the Florida peninsula and occupies a total land area of 2,200 square miles. The County is bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean, on the north by Broward County, on the west by Collie r County, and on the south by Monroe County. The County po s sesses one of the largest coastal populations on the eastern seaboard. A population density of this magn i tude poses exceptional problems in terms effectively managing an emergency or disaster. C l imate The climate of a region is determined by the monthly or longer weather pattern conditions that exist within a specified area. Northern and Central Florida is categorized as having a subtropical climate, while Sout h ern Florida has a tropical climate with hig h humidity and precipitation. r mined by the amount and changes in precipitation. The rainy season lasts from June to September where 55 pe r cent of the annual rain fall occurs; subjecting Florida to hurricanes, thund erstorms, and tropical c y clones. The average temperatures during the rainy season are 70 degrees Fahrenheit in the northern regions and 80 degrees Fahrenheit in the southern regions. Florida averages 54.57 inches a year with an average of 76.7 days of thu nderstorms and 46.5 tornadoes a year. The record high for precipitation in a 24 hour period is 38.70 inc hes, and a high of 127.24 inches in a calendar year. The dry season lasts from October to May where 40 pe rcent of the annual rain fall occurs; with an average temperature of 64 degrees Fahrenheit in the northern r egions and 77 degrees Fahrenheit in the southern regions. The Gulf Stream regulates the climate variants throughout the state with seldom extremes of over 100 degrees Fahrenheit and below 32 d egrees Fahrenheit. The record high is 109 degrees Fahrenheit with a record low of 2 d e grees. G eology, Hydrology and E cology Geology Miami Dade County is located in the southern portion of Florida. The geological conditions of southern Florida are considered young; forming around 120,000 years ago during the Pleistocene Period. Just below the ground surface there is Miami Lim estone, the Fort Thompson Formations, and Anastasia Fo rmations. Miami Limestone consists of ooli t ic

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 32 of 237 and bryozoans facies. The oolitic facies are a combination of Oolitic, small round grains, limestone and fo ssils. The bryozoans facies are a sandy fossil limestone. The fossils found include mollusks, bryo z o anz, and corals. In some regions the Miami Limestone reaches a thickness of 40 feet. Fort Thompson Formations u nderlies the Miami Limestone and consists of sandy soils, marine beds, and brackish and freshwater lim estones. The Fort Thompson Formations c an reach thicknesses up to 150 feet. The Anastasia Formations also underlies the Miami Limestone and consists of shelly limestone and coquina limestone. The Miami Lim estone is highly porous and permeable and forms much of the Biscayne Aquifer system. The natural marl soils found above the Miami Limestone have been affected by drainage and erosion due to development and agr iculture. The Biscayne Aquifer lies just below the surface and due to the permeabi l ity of the soil makes the aquifer vulnerable to con tamination. Hydrology The hydrology of Florida is system of low gradient drainage, high ground water table, and an extensive drai nage canal network. There are two major aquifers in Florida that make up the water table. Aquifers are areas of rock below t he ground surface that can produce sufficient amounts of water to efficiently supply the comm unities within the region. There are three different types of aquifers: unconfined, is where the water table is able to move freely without interference due to th e lack of aquitard; a non permeable fo r mation, semi confined, is where the water table is partially confined due to semi permeable formations; and confined, is where the water table is completely confined by non permeable formations above and below the bod y of water. The aquifers found within Florida have combinations of all three types within varying d e grees. The Floridan Aquifer encompasses the entire state while the Biscayne Aquifer encompasses the southern po rtion of the state. The Floridan Aquifer pr oduces much of the northern and ce n the southern region has been polluted by brackish water from deep wells. The Biscayne Aquifer supplies the southern region of the state -mainly Dade, Broward, and Monroe cou n ties. Th is aquifer is one of the most productive aquifers in the world, but it is very susceptible to pollution from agricultural and indu s trial practices because of the permeability of the soil and rock formations.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 33 of 237 AQUIFER MAP OF FLORIDA Local Water Resource Management: The extensive system of levees and canals transport surface and ground water and protects against flooding and salt water intrusion into the water supply. This system is managed by the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD). The sou rce of surface water is mai n ly from the wet season and travels from the northern and central regions to the southern flowing from Lake Okeechobee. The levees direct and store the surface water to prevent flooding and to supply regions for use during the d ry se ason. The ground water also flows from the northern regions to the coast and is drawn from field wells from the Biscayne Aquifer. Ecology The ecology of Florida is a relationship between organisms and their environments. With the combination of Flo n tists. The various classifications differ depending on the organization and scale of the system that is being evalua ted but the basic ecosystems include the following: Coral Reefs : Are colonies of polyps that form complex calcium carbonate shells to protect the mselves against predators and pollutants. As the colonies die and compete for space the new coral grows on top of another to form a coral reef. Ther e are over 30 different co r al reefs identified around Florida that are home to thousands of plant and animal species.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 34 of 237 Dunes : Are mounds of sand that are created by the coastal winds and hel d together by grass veget ation. t is comprised of sand and the dunes serve as a barrier that protects the inland from the coastal winds and waves. Freshwater Marshes : Are areas where there is a standing body of water generally year round loca ted on the inland and have little to no tree or scrub life. The grasses, sedges, and rushes act as a filter in removing particles and pollutants from the waters that flow through. There are four different types of freshwater marshes in Florida: wet prairies, sawgrass marshes, ponds, and aquatic slo ughs. Salt Marshes : Are areas where freshwater and saltwater meet along the coastal regions. Salt marshes also contain little to no tree or scrub life. The vegetation that inhabits the areas is brac k ish in nature. Freshwater Swamps : Are areas inland wh ere there is considerable standing water during the rainy season and the soils typically dry out during the dry season. There is a variety of vegetation that i nhabits the swamps including softwood trees, hardwood trees, vines, and ferns. Upland Hardwoods : Are areas of forest with nutrient clay soil that typically are bordered by sandhills and flatwoods in northern and central regions of the state. There is a vast variety of tree and plant life with no dominating species within the forests. Most of Flori dwood ecosystem. Bottom Hardwoods : Are areas of forest with wet nutrient soil that typically border lakes, rivers, and sinkholes found throughout Florida. Bottom hardwood forest provides a transition area between the upland hardwoods, swamps, marches, and other wetlands and is dominated by Live Oaks, Red M aples, and Water Oaks. This region typically floods and is constantly changing because of the different climates and region s in which the forest is found. Sandhills : Are areas of forest with permeable, dry, sandy soils that typically do not flood. The forest is dominated by Longleaf Pine and Turkey Oak trees with different grass speci es blanketing the forest floor. The forest is subjected to fire due to the dry, sa ndy conditions. Scrubs : Are areas that have permeable, nutrient poor, sandy soils found on higher elevations where the water table is low. Scrubs are communities of pinelands with an undergrowth of oaks, shrubs, and palmettos, and are fire dependent to r egenerate because of the soil conditions and lack of water su pply. Flatwoods : Are areas of forest of semi permeable soil and limestone of level land that makes up 50 percent of the covered land mass of the state. The forest is dominated by Longleaf Pines and Slash Pines with undergrowth of palmetto, wildflowers, and ferns. Flatwood forests are fire dependent to r egenerate not only due to the soil conditions but the competition between the hardwood forest for space and sunlight. Tropical Hammocks : Are ar eas of hardwood forest of thick mounds of permeable soil and peat bo rdered by marshes, mangrove swamps, and flatwoods, but typically do not flood due to the el e vation of the soils. Hammock forests are dominated by Gumbo Limbo and Pigeon Plum trees that ar e only found in southern Florida and contain plant and animal life found nowhere else in the Uni t ed States. Mangroves : Are areas where the mangroves tree inhabit. There are three species of mangroves in Florida: the White Mangrove, the Black Mangrove, an d the Red Mangrove. Each of the species of mangroves grow in different regions. All three species typically inhabit areas where there is a saltw ater source or is regularly flooded by saltwater. The Red Mangrove inhabits areas along the coastal edge. Th e Black Mangrove inhabits inland below the water table. The White Mangrove inhabits hig her evaluations where there is a lower water table.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 35 of 237 E nvironment Florida is a peninsula that is surrounded by two main bodies of water -the Gulf of Mexico and the Atl antic Ocean -resulting in Florida being mainly composed of marshes, swamps, lakes, rivers, and springs. Ce n tral Florida has the highest concentration of lakes with Lake Okeechobee being the largest. There are 1,711 ri vers, streams, and creeks with the are 111 lakes with the major lakes Lake Okeechobee and Lake George. The Miami Canal connects Lake Okeechobee to Biscayne Bay crossing through Miami Dade County. Miami Dade County i s located in the southeastern part of the state. The county has a land area of 2,431 square miles, 1,946 square miles of land, and 485 square miles of water, making it the third largest in the state. Most of the land is close to sea level with an elevati on of an average 6 feet above. The eastern side of Miami Dade Country is composed mainly of be located in the Biscayne Bay area and the Atlantic Oce an. The Bi s cayne Bay is divided by the South Beach and Miami Beach and is approximately 40 miles long and ranges from 2 10 miles wide. erosion, and pollution to some of the ecosystems within the region. The establishment of the Biscayne N ational Park in 1968 served to protect marine, plant, and animal life along the coastal region. Since the 1980s over 20 percent of the bay has been degraded due to tourism and development. Efforts are in place to pr eserve aquatic life, rebuild reefs, remove air and water po l lutants, protect endangered lands, initiate restoration projects, and to ultimately reduce the human impact on the environment. P opulation & De mographics Miami Dade County has experienced a steady and rapid population growth, particularly in the 1960s and 1970s. Population doubled from 1960 to 1990. Projected growth through 2025 is expected to follow a sim i lar trend, albeit at a somewhat slower rate. The principal driver of population growth has been and will co n tinue to be immigration. Net immigration is projected to reach over 240,000 persons in the period 2020 2025. Clea rly the effects of immigration over the past 41 years have dramatically shaped the ethnic comp o sition of Miami Dade County. It is expected that there will be a more moderate augmentation of Hispanics as the dominant ethnic group. Official 2010 population estimates for all jurisdictions within Miami Dade County are presented in Table 1.1 below. The most current estimated countywide population of Miami Dade County is 2,496,435 people (U.S. Census 2010). The most populated city in Miami Dade County is Miami, with an estimated 399,457 res i dents. Despite the many incorporated a reas, an estimated 44.4% of the countywide population lives in the unincorp orated portion of the County. Between 2000 and 2010, Miami Dade County as a whole had a growth rate of 10.8%. TABLE 1.1. POPULATION ESTIMATES FOR MIAMI DADE COUNTY (2000 2010) April 1, 2010 April 1, 2000 Total Change Percent Change

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 36 of 237 April 1, 2010 April 1, 2000 Total Change Percent Change State of Florida 18,801,310 15,982,824 2,818,486 17.6 Miami Dade County 2,496,435 2,253,779 242,656 10.8 Aventura 35,762 25,267 10,495 41.5 Bal Harbour 2,513 3,305 792 24.0 Bay Harbor Island s 5,628 5,146 482 9.4 Biscayne Park 3,055 3,269 214 6.5 Coral Gables 46,780 42,249 4,531 10.7 Cutler Bay 40,286 0 40,286 (X) Doral 45,704 0 45,704 (X) El Portal 2,325 2,505 180 7.2 Florida City 11,245 7,843 3,402 43.4 Golden Beach 919 919 0 0.0 Hialeah 224,669 226,419 1,750 0.8 Hialeah Gardens 21,744 19,297 2,447 12.7 Homestead 60,512 31,909 28,603 89.6 Indian Creek 86 33 53 160.6 Islandia 18 6 12 200.0 Key Biscayne 12,344 10,507 1,837 17.5 Medley 838 1,098 260 23.7 Miami 399,457 362, 470 36,987 10.2 Miami Beach 87,779 87,933 154 0.2 Miami Gardens 107,167 0 107,167 (X) Miami Lakes 29,361 0 29,361 (X) Miami Shores 10,493 10,380 113 1.1 Miami Springs 13,809 13,712 97 0.7 North Bay Village 7,137 6,733 404 6.0 North Miami 58,786 59 ,880 1,094 1.8 North Miami Beach 41,523 40,786 737 1.8 Opa locka 15,219 14,951 268 1.8 Palmetto Bay 23,410 0 23,410 (X) Pinecrest 18,223 19,055 832 4.4

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 37 of 237 April 1, 2010 April 1, 2000 Total Change Percent Change South Miami 11,657 10,741 916 8.5 Sunny Isles Beach 20,832 15,315 5,517 36.0 Surfside 5,744 4 ,909 835 17.0 Sweetwater 13,499 14,226 727 5.1 Virginia Gardens 2,375 2,348 27 1.1 West Miami 5,965 5,863 102 1.7 UNINCORPORATED 1,109,571 1,204,705 95,134 7.9 TABLE. POPULATION CHANGE FOR COUNTIES IN FLORIDA, 1980 THROUGH 2010 Percent Change 2010 2000 1990 1980 2000 to 2010 1990 to 2000 1980 to 1990 State of Florida 18,801,310 15,982,824 12,938,071 9,746,961 17.6% 23.5% 32.7% Miami Dade Cou n ty 2,496,435 2,253,779 1,937,194 1,625,509 10.8% 16.3% 19.2% TABLE. RANK OF FLORIDA COUNTIES B Y POPULATION SIZE (TOP 5 COUNTIES) Percent of State Population Rank 2010 2000 1990 1980 2010 2000 1990 1980 State of Flor i da 18,801,310 15,982,824 12,938,071 9,746,961 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 1 Miami Dade 2,496,435 2,253,779 1,937,194 1,625,50 9 13.28 14.10 14.97 16.68 2 Broward 1,748,066 1,623,018 1,255,531 1,018,257 9.30 10.15 9.70 10.45 3 Palm Beach 1,320,134 1,131,191 863,503 576,758 7.02 7.08 6.67 5.92 4 Hillsborough 1,229,226 998,948 834,054 646,939 6.54 6.25 6.45 6.64 5 Orange 1,145,9 56 896,344 677,491 470,865 6.10 5.61 5.24 4.83

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 38 of 237 TABLE. POPULATION BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN (2010) Non Hispanic Total White Black Asian Other Hispanic State of Florida 18,801,310 57.9% 15.2% 2.4% 2.1% 22.5% Miami Dade Cou n ty 2,496,435 15.4% 1 7.1% 1.4% 1.1% 65.0% C ulture Florida has a rich cultural history dating back 10,000 years with archeological discoveries of Native Amer i can nomads that lived off the land and local game. The Tequesta people inhabited the region unaffected by ou tside in fluence until the arrival of Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon in 1513. The Spanish conti n ued to control Florida for 250 years after the first failed established mission in 1567. The United States purchased Florida for 5 million dollars in 1821. Miami Dade County was named after a soldier, Major Francis Dade, kil led in the Second Seminole War. The County was formally created in 1836 under the Territorial Act as Dade County. Florida did not begin to boom in development until the arrival of the railroa d in 1896 by Henry Flagler, and later with the development of su bdivisions and tourist resorts by the 1920s. Additionally, there was a surge in population during World War II with the training of troops. After the war, many troops returned with their fam ilies to take up a permanent res idence. Furthermore, Florida has become home to thousands of refugees with a signi f icant influx from Cuba during the 1960s, following the Cuban revolution, and Haiti in the 1990s. Since the first Spanish inhabitants, Miami Dade County has developed into a multi cultural destination. Over in the 1960s w ith over a 35 percent increase. The foreign born population is 50.6 percent with 65 percent of the population being Hispanic or of Latino descent. P olitical Governance Miami Dade County was named after a soldier, Major Francis Dade, killed in the Second Seminole War. The county was formally created in 1836 under t he Territo rial Act as Dade County. In 1956, a constitutional amendment was approved by the people of Florida to enact a home rule charter. Up until then the county was governed and ruled by the state. Since 1957 the county has operated under a two tier federation me t ropolitan system. The two tier federation separates the local and county government. There are 3 5 municipalities that govern independently from the county. The local governments are respons ible for zoning and code enforcement, police and f ire protection, and other city services required wit h in each jurisdiction. The Unincorporated Municipal Services Area (UMSA) covers the residents of all the unincorp orated areas within the county.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 39 of 237 The structure of the county government has an elected offi cial, Executive Ma y or, and the Board of County Commissioners with 13 elected members, each serving a four year term. The ma y or is not a part of the board of commissioners but has the veto power over the board. The ma y or oversees the operations of the cou n ty. The Commission is the legislative branch that oversees the legislation, creates depart ments, and business operations. Miami Dade County is the only county in Florida where the Sheriff is appointed by the County Ma yor and is not elected by the residen ts. d ministrative branch and legislative branch with four elected off i cials. Miami Dade County Departments: Animal Services Audit and Management Services Aviation (Miami International Airport) Comm unity Action and Human Services Community Information and Outreach Corrections and Rehabilitation Elections Finance Fire Rescue Information Technology Internal Services Juvenile Services Libraries Management and Budget Medical Examiner Parks, Recreation an d Open Spaces Police Public Housing and Community Development Public Works and Waste Management Regulatory and Economic Resources Seaport (Port Miami) Transit Water and Sewer B uilt Environment The term built environment refers to the human made surroundi ngs that provide the setting for human a c tivity, ranging in scale from personal shelter and buildings to neighborhoods and cities that can often i n clude their supporting critical infrastructure (bridges, water treatment, highways, etc) and key resource (sc hools, mus eums, etc) assets. The built environment is a material, spatial and cultural product of human labor that co mbines physical elements and energy in forms necessary for living, working and playing. In urban planning, the phrase connotes the idea t hat a large percentage of the human environment is man made, and these artificial

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 40 of 237 surroundings are so extensive and cohesive that they function as organisms in the consumption of resources, disposal of wastes, and facilitation of productive enterprise with in its bounds. The built environment can be organized into three broad categories, which are detailed more thoroughly in the Physical Vulnerability Assessment These c ategories, and their respective subcategories, include: Critical Infrastructure Airpo rt Communications Energy Freight Rail Pipelines Solid Waste Transit Transportation Water Control Water / Wastewater Treatment Waterways / Ports Key Resources Emergency Services Healthcare Schools Universities Other Key Resources Housing Stock Commercia l & Industrial Buildings Governmental Buildings Housing Stock E conomy The economy is led by a diversified group of four sectors, primarily service related, that provide over 50 pe rcent of employment in Miami Dade County. Each of the following sectors ac count for more than 10 pe r cent of Miami Dade employment: Professional and Business Services, Government, and Education and Health Se rvices and Retail Trade. The Wholesale Trade and Transportation sectors that clearly are linked to internatio nal trade prov Finally, the Leisure and Hospitality se ctor that significantly services the Miami Dade tourism industry provides 141,786 jobs or 8.7 percent of total employment.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 41 of 237 When compared to all firms in the Cou nty, minority business firms are characterized by their smaller size as measured by number of employees, receipts and payroll. Although the numbers of Black and Hispanic owned firms, at first glance appears high at 191,522 or 64.4 percent of all firms in Miami Dade County, most of these are self employed firms with no employees. Black and Hispanic minority firms provided 148,234 jobs or 17.5 percent of total private sector employment in 2002. The two significant external generators of economic activity i n Miami Dade County are international trade, and tourism. While there is no rigorous way to determine the weight of international trade and tourism in the M iami Dade economy, without doubt, both of these external sectors are vital components for a healthy and gro wing local economy. Tourism in the Greater Miami area continues to be an important component of the overall Miami Dade econ omy. Since 1980 tourism, as measured by overnight visitors, has grown steadily from just over 6.7 million in 1980 to 11.3 m illion total visitors in 2005. However, this growth has been marred by several significant dow nturns in tourist activity. From 1980 through 1986, there was a continuous decline in total vis i tors. In fact, it was not until 1988 that the total visitor cou nt reached the 1980 level. In addition, from 2000 until 2003, total visitor count fell continuously, decreasing by 927,700. Emergency Management Support F a cilities Emergency management support facilities come in a variety of different forms depending up on the variety and extent of the hazard being addressed. The following have been identified and established for the su p port of the Miami Dade County emergency response and recovery e f fort: 1. Miami Dade EM ; 2. Miami Dade Divisional Emergency Operations Ce n ters (EOCs); 3. Staging sites (personnel); 4. Staging sites (material); 5. Logistical Centers (perishable goods); 6. Logistical Centers (non perishable goods). A number of criteria must be met in o r der to qualify a site as eligible under one of these eight categ o ries. Th e RIAT landing sites must have a sufficiently clear area to handle the type of aircraft (fixed wing or hel i copter) being em ployed by the RIAT Team. Also considered are basic ground support components (Ground Power Unit (GPU), fueling equipment, tie downs etc.) the aircraft r e quires. Logistical c enters for perishable goods require refrigeration and an auxiliary power source to sustain the refrigeration when normal utilities have been i n terrupted. PART 2 NATURAL HAZARDS Human populations have been subj ect to natural hazards for their entire history. Pestilence, plague, drought, floods, severe storms have all tak en their toll through the ages. Natural hazards are indeed nat u ral but their reality is that they threaten life, property, and economic stabil ity. The impacts of natural hazards are som etimes predictable. The impact of floods, for example, the extent, the area subject to floo d ing, and the expected

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 42 of 237 dollar damage have been predicted through flood hazard mapping and computer damage models. Howev er, the impacts of other events are arbitrary and dependent upon a variety of interrelated and compounding fa ctors that increases a community's vulnerability. The Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) provides detailed information r egar d ing the natural hazards mentioned below that could impact Miami Dade County. Drought Extreme Cold/Freeze Extreme Heat Flooding (Inland and Coastal) Hailstorms Heavy Rain Hurricane & Tropical Storm Lightning Severe Winter Weather (i.e. Winter Storm/Ic e Storm) Sinkholes/Erosion Space (i.e. Meteorites, Solar Flares) Tornado Tsunami Volcano (i.e. Ash, Dust) Windstorms Wildland Fire Earthquake Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Southeast Florida has experienced 34 hurr i canes between 1994 and 20 12 Nine of the se storms have been Miami ficant number of coastal residents are factors that increase risk during an evacuation due to the arrival of a hu rricane. Over 40 0,000 coastal residents are required to evacuate in the event of a Category 5 hurricane. E va cuation of over 400,000 reside nts and visitors is achievable, however, factors such as landfall and intensity hu rricane require s technology to gauge clearance time In addition, clearance time must be considered for su rrounding counties. The clearance time becomes shorter if the size of the storm, or its predicted landfall, r equires the evacuation of adjacent counties, especially Broward or Monroe. The problems t hat arise from mer g ing the evacuees from both Miami Dade and Broward Counties may extend clearance times beyond re asonable limits. As a result, Miami Dade County residents are discouraged from evacuating out of the County unless they are utilizing air tra n s portation or evacuate very early. The threat from storm surge represents a serious hazard to the barrier island communities and the entire southern half of the County During Hurricane Andrew in 1992, record high flooding occurred due to 17 feet of sto rm surge In addition, flooding due to torrential rainfall (inundation) pose s a serious threat in portions of M iami Dade County.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 43 of 237 Pre landfall hazards associated with a hurricane also pose a significant threat to a successful evacuation. Residents have a tendency to delay evacuation until the last minute which results in overflowing roadways and traffic jams. T orrential rains and tropical storm force winds associated with the outer bands of a hurricane fr equently render evacuation routes impassable long b efore the predicted landfall of the storm. In accordance with a wind effects report distributed by the Florida Institute of Technology, Tropical Storm Force Winds (TSFW) can down trees and power lines, blow out windows, blow down signs, cause flying debri s, structural collapse and cause vehicles to overturn and deviate from their course. 2 It is the policy of Miami Dade County to plan for the e ffects of TSFWs on preparedness activities and evacuation proc e dures. When TSFWs (one minute sustained 34 knots or 39 mph winds) occur, countywide evacu a tion and pre storm preparatory activities cease. At this time, county facilities and response agencies, including the M i ami Dade EOC, begin A ll on duty personnel are required to report to a secure du ty st a tion, and vehicular traffic flow is prevented In some instances where weather conditions do not deteriorate un i formly across the County, departments and response agencies may make exceptions to extend prepare d ness activities beyond However, s uch exceptions are specified in department disaster response plan s. Each d eplan must specify the cond i tions and the criteria used to determine the need for an extension. The Miami Dade Emergency Management strongly recommends that the safety of first responders and county e mployees be the chief concern when drafting extension proc e dures. The potential for property damage resulting from a major hurricane represents one of Miami Dade Cou n most serious threats. Hurricane Andrew, a small, fast moving category 5 storm struck the sparsely pop u lated agricultural area of southern Miami esulting damage from this storm totaled over $27 billion and posed a serious econo mic threat to a number of Miami County and the insurance industry at large. A category 5 hu r ricane striking in the more populated regions of the County would put over 2.4 million residents at risk and could easily result in los ses of such proportions that the financial health of the County its mun i cipalities and many businesses in the private sector would be placed in jeopardy. A disaster of this ma g nitude would also pose a serious threat, on a national level, to the banking a nd insurance industries as well as the ge n eral economy of the country. Tornadoes and Thunderstorms and Lightning Storms The number of tornadoes in Florida generally increases during the months of June, July, and A u gust with a decline in October, November, and December. Tropical cyclones tend to enhance the occurrence of torn a does during the late summer and early fall. Tornadoes during the winter and spring tend to be more powerful though due to the presence of the jet stream. Historically, Florida experi ences stronger and more da n gerous tornadoes in Febr u ary, March, and April. Unlike the rest of the nation, strong to violent tornadoes in Florida are just as likely to occur after midnight as they are during the afternoon. This unique feature makes Flori da tornadoes very da n gerous because most people are asleep and do no t receive adequate weather warnings. Additio n ally, Miami Dade County has over 60 m obile home parks that are particularly vulnerable to the high winds associated with severe thunderstorms and torn a does. 2 Pinelli, Jean Eme r gency Management, Florida Division of Community A f fairs. August 31, 2003

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 44 of 237 Florida is the most lightning prone area in the United States In fact, lightning alone kills more people a n nually in Florida than all other weather hazards combined. Severe thunderstorms and lightning strikes are traditiona lly responsibl e for the most frequent damage in Miami Dade County. Windstorm damage resulting from dow nbursts and squall lines frequently knocks down trees and power lines. On rare occasions, l igh t ning strikes are responsible for triggering wild land fires, da m aging el ectrical transformers, and causing roof damage. Flooding Much of Miami Dade County is susceptible to localized flooding, particularly during the rainy season of June through October. One area in particular experiences flooding on a regular b a sis. Known as the 8 square mile area, it is located west of the L 31N Levee, between SW 104 th Street on the north and SW 168 th Street on the south. The mean elevation of Miami Dade County is a relatively flat 11 feet. The County causes i The South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) is responsible for water management in Miami Dade County. The system is designed to retain water in certain areas and, through a s e ri es of flood control gates, drain the excess water into Biscayne and Florida Bays B ay salinity constraints limit this dra i nage system to a maximum flow of one inch of water drained every twenty four hours. In Miami Dade County, serious flooding can o c cur near rivers and canals, as well as in urban areas, due to poor percolation rates and low elevations. Recent construction in previously uninhabited areas of M i ami Dade County has led to exposure from flooding due to a susceptibility to small changes in gr oundwater el e vations. After heavy periods of rain, those areas revert to their swampy origins, causing isolation of res i dences and businesses, damage to roadways and utilities, contamination of water supplies, and an inte r ruption of essential emergency se rvices. Droughts, Hot & Cold Weather, and Contaminated Water Supplies Miami rcent of the total land area of the County Crops are grown year round with the primary season between Oct ober and March. Local agriculture is susceptible to freezes, drought, flooding, diseases, and pests. Since the primary growing season does not coincide with the rainy season, most of the water needed to irrigate crops comes from wells In times of drought, the use of well water for crop irrigati on lowers the water table. The lo wered water table becomes ex posed to salt water which serious ly compromise s the County potable water supplies. Miami Dade County obtains its potable wa ter supply from the Biscayne Aquifer, which is primarily reple n ished by rainwater. In times of drought, water is supplied by the South Florida Water Management Di s trict regional system. It should be noted however, that the regional system is d e signed to su pplement Miami Dade well s not re place them. Over pumping the well fields in time of drought can lead to salt water intr u sion and a permanent compromise of Miami South Florida Water Manag e ment has constructed levees to aid i u sion. Miami Dade County has experienced temperatures of 35 F or lower on 85 occasions since 1948. In each case, the low temperature occurred in a period from late November to early March with the peak number of

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 45 of 237 events occurring in January. Demands for electricity during unusually hot or cold weather results in the inte rruption of service and increases the probability of rol l ing brownouts. Wildfires Thousands of acres of land in Miami Dade County are covered with either wild grasses or forests. This land is most vulnerable to wildfire at the height of the dry season, which extends from January through May. The largest number of lightning generated fires, however, coincides with maximum th understorm a c tivity and peaks in July. The most co m mon causes of wildfires within the County are: Arson; Carelessness by smokers; The burning of debris; Operation of heavy equipment; Children playing with matches. The rapid western development of Miami Dade County increases the vulnerability of the popul a tion and wildlife to wildfires. These fires now threaten what were once the rural and unpopulated regions of west Miami Dade. In addition to structural, environmental, and agricultural damage, health a nd safety issues now arise from the inhalation and poor visibility due to smoke in the now more densely populated regions of west M i ami Dade. Public Health Hazards Disasters, almost by definition, involve health risks. Current discussions of disasters te nd to center on te r rorist attacks and health risks. It is important to remember that disasters are a multi faceted challenge and include the public health consequences of geophysical hazards, industrial/technological accidents, terrorist events, and biolo gical disasters, such as SARS outbreaks and E. coli contamination. The Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) provides detailed information regar d ing the public health hazards mentioned below that could impact Miami Dade County. Anim al and Plant Disease Outbreak Food Borne Illness Incident Meningitis Plague Anthrax Pandemic/Epidemic Water Contamination Epidemic/Disease/Exotic Pests Miami Dade County health officials closely monitor public health for the reintroduction of previously c o n trolled or eradicated diseases as well as newly evolving diseases such as Colombian Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola, Avian Flu and the new forms of Dengue Fever. Our proximity to the Caribbean basin, Central and South America, our sub tropical climate, and the a tion industry,

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 46 of 237 requires constant vigilance in the disease prevention arena. Emphasis on preventative public health measures such as Bio Watch, vector control; water purification, sanitary waste dispos al, health i n spections, and public health education have been put in place to mitigate these potential disa s ters. ntagious disease but the introduc tion of agricultural disease such as citrus canker and the Mediterr a nean fruit fly which could destroy our agricultural sector. Cl imate Change The projected changes in the climate pose several challenges for Miami Dade County. F u ture changes in the clima te may exacerbate the frequency and impacts of the hazards previously me n tioned Longer more severe dry season s coupled with shorter duration wet seasons consisting of higher volume precip i tation will generate a pattern of drought and flood events that can impact our entire ec o system. The predictions for climate change are as follows: increased air and ocean temperatures; changes in precipit ation with wetter wet seasons and dryer dry season s ; more extreme hot and cold weather events; i n creased coastal e rosion; continuous sea level rise; increas ed development of tropical diseases in plants, wildlife, and humans; increas ed strains upon and costs in infrastructure mitigation. The section below fu r ther discusses those hazards which are of particular concern to Miami Dade County Wind Events Impacts from wind related events such as tornados, thunderstorms, and tropical cyclones may be e n hanced due to climate change. South Florida has a high propensity for hurricane activity since it is vulnerable to both Atlantic and Caribb e an hurricanes. The primary climatic effects of hurricanes are high wind, storm surge, and heavy rains. Scientists predict that climate change is likely to exacerbate a hurricane s effects ; however, precise ly how remains unce rtain. Hi gher water temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico may cause more intense hurricanes, which can create more damage to coastal and inland habitations, and infrastru c ture (Elsner 2006; Peterson et al. 2007; USNOAA 2008; USEPA CRE 2008). 3 Hurr icanes have potential to i m pact all areas of Miami Dade County, depending upon their origin, makeup and path. Most hurricanes have heavily impacted county res idents, without displaying heavy winds or structural damage, as earlier, more powe r ful storms (i. e., Andrew, 1992) have displayed with entire communities being destroyed Weather forecasters and emergency mana gers must consider a hurricane's potential for flooding, and not just structural damage, when a storm is impen d3 Elsner, James B. 2006. Evidence in support of the climate change Atlantic hurricane hypothesis. Geophysical Research Le t ters 33 (L16705): 1 3. Peterson, Charles H. Richard T. Barber, Kathryn L. Cottingham, Heike K. Lotze, Charles A. Simenstad, Robert R. Christian, M isensitive ecosystems and r esources. Washington, D.C.: United States Environmental Protection Agency. United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (USNOAA) 2008. Draft Climate Change Handbook, National Ocea nic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service. Un ited States Environmental Protection Agency Climate Ready Estuaries (USEPA CRE) 2008. Draft synthesis of adaptation o p tions for coastal areas. Distributed at NEP National Meeting, 26 February 2008. 26 pp.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 47 of 237 ing. E ffects from more intense hurricanes coupled with more severe storm surges ( resulting from higher sea levels ), will result in greater damage and reach further i n land Flooding and Sea Level Ris e Impacts from water related events such as flooding due to sea level ris e may be enhan ced due to climate change. Scientists have predicted that global sea l e vel rise is one of the most likely effects of global war m ing. Along much of the Florida coast, the sea level already has risen seven to nine inches per ce n tury. Sea level rise will ch ange coastlines in many ways (USEPA CRE 2008; Volk 2008; Bollman 2007; T i tus 1998) 4 including erosion with landward migration of coastlines, and barrier island disintegration. NOAA defines beach erosion Coastal erosion is a natural process even in pristine environments; however, in areas where human activity negatively impacts the shor eline, coastal erosion can become a serious problem. It is est i mated that coastal erosio n in the U.S. costs $700 million annually (National Sea Grant Office). Coastal areas within Miami Dade County may see higher level s of storm surge with greater impacts to stru ctures and infrastructure Inland, c anal and groundwater elevations when combin ed with seasonal rainfall va ri a tions and the volume of precipitation produced by a potential storm, will result in a definite flood hazard. M iami Dade County residents w ill be at greater risk should th ese hazardous events begin to occur more fr equently an d with higher intensity in the f u ture. Droughts and Wildfires As the climate changes, increased air temperature will cause increased evaporation contributing to drought conditions. The increased dry environment and lack of water will also be a concern as it relates to the occu rrence of wildfires and the impact that drought conditions will have on Miami Dade C agricultural indu stry. The south end of Miami Dade County depends on the farming of agricultural crops for their economic liv elihood. As a result of increased drought conditions, the County will have to implement water restriction measures to ensure water is available to its residents. Epidemic Diseases and Exotic Pests Climate change will affect the phenology of pest and insects by alterin g reproductive cycles, feeding and pr edation, and mismatching with host plants and pollinators (Backlund et al.2008) 5 Warmer temper a tures and changes in precipitation affect the spread and distribution of zoonotic diseases (diseases spread through an imal s) as infectious carriers, such as mos q uito e s and ticks Infected insects can ca r ry infectious diseases to humans ( i.e. dengue fever and viral hemorrhagic fever ) which can sometimes be deadly. 4 United States Environmental Protection Agency C limate Ready Estuaries (USEPA CRE) 2008. Draft synthesis of adaptation o p tions for coastal areas. Distributed at NEP National Meeting, 26 February 2008. 26 pp. Volk, Michael. 2008a. An analysis of strategies for adaptation to sea level rise in Flo r ida Gainesville, FL: University of Florida. 143 pp. Volk, Michael. 2008b. Summary of research on strategies for adaptation to sea level rise in Florida. Gainesville, FL: Univers ity of Florida. 25 pp state policy framework for adaptation to climate change. Ft. Laude r dale, FL: Florida Atlantic University Center for Urban and Environmental Solutions. 38pp. and beaches without hurting prope r ty 1399. 5 Backlund, P., A. Janetos, and D. Schimel 2008. The effects of climate change on agr i culture, land resources, water resources, and biodiversity in the United States. Was h ington, DC: U.S. Climate Changes Science Program. 202 pp.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 48 of 237 The effects of disease in marine organisms are likely to bec ome more severe, since warmer temperatures generally favor the development of pathogens relative to thei r hosts (Harvell et al. 2002) 6 As a cons e quence, there will be an increased cost in preventative measures undertaken to limit the spread of di s eases c aused by insects, animals and marine organisms. PART 3 TECHNOLOGICAL HAZARDS In many respects, life in the 21st century is dependent on technology. lter, and clothing are no longer available except through manufact ured means. Food production, housing, hea ting, and transportation to our work locations are all dependent upon technology. Miami Dade County is part of an industrialized region of the nation and has a very dynamic and complex infr astructure. It has impor tant transportation networks; an international airport; large wholesale centers for the exchange and distribution of goods; and is a major economic power in the state of Florida. nfrastructure, large residential population, and highly indust rialized nature make it vulnerable to tec h nological hazards. Unlike natural hazards that are often forecast, technological hazards are sudden and unexpected. Technolog ical hazards include hazardous materials releases, large scale fires, structural failure s, transportation incidents, and utility failures. In many cases, the risks are minimized through engineered safety mechanisms, but in ot hers the risk is magnified due to aging infrastructure and security vulnerabilities. Technolo g ical hazards can result in incidents that range in size from those that are easily contained, to those that can overwhelm Miami Technological hazards pose a credible risk to the County and this will co ntinue to do so due to our society's growin g dependence on technology. The Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) provides detailed information regar d ing the technological hazards mentioned below that could impact Miami Dade County. Hazardous Materials Release Dam Failure/Le vee/Dike Structural Fires Transportation Incident (i.e. Highway and/or Rail Incident) Contaminated Water Incident Electric Utility Failure Mass Migration Hazardous Materials Incidents Miami ither the accidental or intentional r elease of hazardous materials. Large volumes of hazardous materials are routinely tran s ported to, from and through the county by railroad, highway, air, water, and pipeline. Within Miami Dade County, there are a 6 Harvell, C.D. C.E. Mitchell, J.R. Ward, S. Altizer, A. Dobson, R.S. Ostfeld, and M.D. Samuel, 2002. Climate warming and disea se risks for terrestrial and marine biota. Science 2962159 2162.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 49 of 237 numbe r of private, fixed, and mobile facilities that produce, use, and store, hazardous materials. M i ami Dade County routinely performs a hazardous materials hazard analysis of all identified Facilities that are delineated in the Super Fund Amendments and Reau thorization Act (SARA) Title III. Coordinating procedures for ha zardous materials response may be found in the Miami Dade County Fire Rescue Department (MDFR) Ha zardous Materials Standard Opera t ing Procedure (SOP). Nuclear Power Plant The Turkey Point Nu clear power plant is located in the southeastern portion of Miami Dade County adj a cent to Biscayne Bay and approximately 10 miles south of Cutler Ridge. Nine of the ten areas within the ten mile Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) are inside Miami Dade County. All of Miami Dade County is within the 50 mile Emergency Planning Zone. The Florida Division of Emergency Management ( F DEM) has the overall r esponsibility for the coordination of any response to a nuclear pow er plant emergency by federal, s tate or local agencies. Miami Dade County r e sponses for protecting its residents in the event of a nuclear power plant emergency are contained in the Turkey Point Procedure which can be found in Volume III of the CEMP PART 4 HUMAN CAUSED HAZARDS The worl d has witnessed a growing number of politically or criminally motivated incidents (hazards) that have had a significant impact on the global social environment. These hazards constitute deliberate acts (violent or non violent) that have a direct relation to political motives and/or events. These acts have a si g nificant effect In the past decade, terrorism has had a significant influence on the daily lives of Americans. The consistent attacks ab road and intermittent attacks within the United States have made all communities more co n scious of the growing risks and vulnerabilities in a free environment. The advancement of technologies has made our communities more vulnerable to the impacts from th ese hazard s It should be noted that the impact of a te rro r ist attack can extend beyond the immediate targeted facility. The effects of terrorism i n clude: Direct Result: Injury, illness, or death. Psychological Reactions: fear, anxiety, stress, shock, r evulsion, long term emotional effects, post traumatic stress. Economic, Political, and Social Impacts. Crime/Terrorism hazards will damage or impair the County's infrastructure, disrupt commerce, and possibly result in large scale health emergencies, dise ase outbreaks, and/or epidemics. Although the total volume of terrorist incidences worldwide has declined in the 1990s, the percentage of terrorist events resulting in fatal ities has grown. As a large U.S. city and a key economic component of the United States, Miami Dade could be a possible target for terrorist activities. Federal and public buildings, large market sectors, critical infrastru cture, tourist attractions, and large scale events are all prime targets for terrorist organizations. Additional vu lnerabilities include: Transportation Systems highways, railways, waterways, and airports are vital to the transport a tion of materials, goods, services and people. Population an attack on a large population is attractive to gain large media attentio n.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 50 of 237 Industry large manufacturers and companies house hazardous materials. Disruption of these facil ities can have an economic impact and cause physical damages to property and loss of lives due to the large volume of hazardous materials housed. Utilities there is a large dependency on telecommunications, power, water, wastewater, and pip e line services for daily activities and operations. Government Buildings an attack on government buildings is attractive in order to deliver a political statement. Ente rtainment/Recreation anywhere that attracts large populations is an attractive target. The Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) provides detailed information regar d ing the crime/terrorism hazards mentioned below that could impact Miami Dade County. Terrorism Bomb Threat Incident Civil Disobedience/Civil Unrest Cyber Security Incident Mass Casualty Miami Dade County is susceptible to a wide variety of disasters capable of producing multiple casualties. Ai rcraft accidents, structur al failures, mass transit accidents, as well as, other man made and natural disa s ters Such incidences could overwhelm standard system of medical assessment and trea t ment. A countywide mass casualty response capability is essential to coordi nate the efforts of multiple agencies r esponding to a mass casualty incident. Miami Dade Fire Rescue (MDFR) maintains several proc e dures related to mass casualty events that have been adopted by other fire rescue departments within the county. Civil Distu rbance Miami Dade County has a multi ethnic population originating from countries with widely divergent political sy stems, religious beliefs, and educational backgrounds. As with any large metropolitan area with diverse cu ltures, civil disturbances must be anticipated and expected. The Miami Dade Police Department (MDPD) has the primary responsibility for gathering intelligence and maintaining law and order within this arena and mai ntains the SOP that outlines the coordination and handling of responses t o civil distur bances M DEM in Caribbean Government Plan also addresses the possibilities of local civil disturbance related to any instabi lity or change in Caribbean gover n ment. Mass Migration The control of immigration into the United States is the responsibility of the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS). T he Department of Homeland Security ha s created the OPLAN Vigilant Sentry Plan. OPLAN Vigilant Sentry describes the basic organization and structure by which Homeland Secur ity Task Force Southeast (HSTF SE) will deploy resources and direct multi agency operations to address a p otential and full scale mass migration event. This plan is outlined in the Change in Caribbean Go vernment Plan. Miami Dade County has a hi story of mass immigration from the Caribbean basin, pa r ticularly Cuba and Haiti. A large uncontrolled influx of immigrants has the potential of significantly disrupting the s o cial and economic

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 51 of 237 stability in Miami Dade County by overwhelming the delivery of essential services such as med i cal response and public safety. Armed violence abroad may also precipitate spon taneous mass immigration to south Flor ida. While the federal government has the primary responsibility for assuming control of mass immigration e mergencies, Miami Dade County may have to provide humanitarian effort i ncluding: shelter, food, water, medical, and other social services. M DEM addresses such circu mstance and is located in Volume III of the CEMP Coa stal Oil Spills Miami Dade County has 368 miles of coastline subject to contamination caused by an oil spill. The respons ibility for the preparation of response plans for coastal oil spills lies with the Florida Department of Environme ntal Pr o tection and the United States Coast Guard. See Figure 9 for map of coastline Terrorism The attack at the World Trade Center in 1993, Oklahoma City in 1995, and the Attack on America on Septe mber 11 th have forever changed the face of terrorism in America. The Cit y of Miami and Miami Dade County h increased federal fun d ing to reduce vulnerability and increase capability. Terrorism increases the likelihood of mas s casualty and mass evacuation from a target area. M DEM has developed a plan to respond to the i mmediate needs of its residents in the event of a terrorist attack involving biological, nuclear, incendiary, chem ical, or explosive devices. Please refer to t he Miami Dade Terrorism Response Plan located in Vo l ume III National Security iami Dade County believes that the ever increasing technical capabilit ies of terrorists groups will inevitably i ncrease the probability of illicit production of weapons of mass destruction. These weapons include nerve gas, genetically altered diseases, virulent poisons, and thermo nuclear devices. The possibil ity that a te rrorist group can obtain and use weapons of this nature poses a serious planning concern to the County Although potential targets are unpredictable, high density popula tion centers nuclear power plants, and military install ations are considered vulnerab le ta r gets. PART 5 HAZARD DEMOGRAPHICS Population According to the United States Census Bureau the population projection of Miami Dade County for 20 11 is 2, 554 766 Over 90% of the population of Miami Dade County lives and works within 12 miles of the coast and thus i m pacts or is impacted by a number of disaster and evacuation scenarios. Miami Dade recognizes that a number of people within the County will require special assistance during the evacuation and r e covery phases of a disaster. In anticipati on of this need, a n Emergency Evacuation Assistance Program (EEAP) h as been established to assist those with access and functional needs throughout the County Details of this pr ogram may be found in the Emergency Evacuation Assistance Program (EEAP) SOP located in Volume II of the CEMP According to the United States Census Bureau the 20 1 0 Census revealed that 643,783 people ( twenty eight percent) in the County speak only English at home. The rest, approximately 1, 650,000 people ( seventy two

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 52 of 237 percent) s peak a language other than English at home, of which 1, 462,668 people (sixty percent) speak Spa nish. The 20 1 0 Census data also revealed 814,824 people (thirty five percent) in the County have a poor command of the English language. These statistics demon strate that a very large segment of our population is unable to understand basic emergency instructions if these instructions are provided only in English. To assist communities in emergency preparedness, M DEM has developed a program to ensure that all em erge ncy messages are issued in English, Spanish and Creole; the three most widely spoken language s in the Cou nty. Several tables have been included in this plan that outline Miami ical area including population projections for the years 200 4 and 2030. These tables are found in Fi g ure 1 and Figures 3 7 The inmate population of Miami Dade County is between 10 ,000 and 12 ,0 0 0. The population distribution of Miami Dade County may be found in Figure 4. T he migrant popul a tion of Miami Dade County is primarily confined to statistical areas 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, and 7.6. The migrant community tends to avoid any inte r face with government agencies. As a result, the County has found it more advantageous to utilize the aus pices of a series of migrant worker organizations to provide information and assistance to this important portion of the community. The following is a list of those organiz a tions: 1. Coalition of Florida Farm worker Organizations Inc. (COFFO); 2. Centro Campes ino; 3. Haitian American Foundation Inc. (HAFI); 4. 5. Mujer, Inc. Hazards by Population Sectors There are 6 types of hazards possible in Miami Dade County that make certain population sectors most vu lnerable. These are as fo l lows: 1. Hurrica nes The areas most vulnerable to damage as a result of a hurricane are those areas subject to storm surge and flooding. In the case of Miami Dade County, the following statistical areas meet the crit erion as most vu l nerable: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 4.1, 4.7, 5.2, 5.6, 5.7, 7.1, 7.4, 7.5, and 7.6. T he map in Figure 3 identifies various statistical areas of Miami Dade County. 2. Floods The areas deemed most vulnerable to flooding ( those areas of lowest elevation with poor drai nage ) have been identified as follo ws: statistical areas 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 7.4, 7.5, and 7.6. These areas are ide ntified on the map in Figure 3 for statistical areas of Miami Dade County. 3. Fire The areas identified as most vulnerable to wildfires, brush fires and other fires are largely in th e western part of the County where, during dry periods, the saw grass becomes dry and very flammable. Since these areas are fairly inaccessible, fire control be comes a problem. When prevailing winds are from the southeast, most fires are driven away from populated areas. However, when a wildfire coi n cides with a cold front, a common occurrence during the dry season, the wind blows from the west effecting the higher populated the western parts of the County. The areas deemed most vulnerable to wildfires a re st atistical areas 3.1, 3.2, 6.1, 6.2, 7.2, 7.3, 7.5, and 7.6. Further details may be obtained by referring to the map in Figure 3.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 53 of 237 4. Radiological The Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant is located in the southeastern po r tion of Miami Dade County approxima tely 10 miles south of Cutler Bay. Nine of the 10 emergency planning zones are within Miami Dade County and the entire County is within the 50 mile emergency planning zone (EPZ). Please refer to Figures 16, 17, 18, and 22 for Turkey Point related informa tion and evacuation details. Miami emergency is contained in the Turkey Point Procedure. 5. Coastal Oil Spills As previously noted, Miami Dade County i s bordered on the East by a late Pleist o cene barrier reef that, in turn, is adjacent to the prime southerly shipping corridor. As noted in Figure 9, there are over 368 miles of environmentally sensitive coastline vulnerable to an oil spill incident. The response to an oil spill would be dependent on the magnitude of the spill. U.S. Coast Guard is the lead agency. Larger spills are handled in cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard and Florida Department of Environmental Prote c tion (FDEP). 6. Cold Wea ther ation when outside air temperature drops below 50F with a wind chill factor of 40 F. Economic Profile The workforce of Miami Dade County has been divided into twel ve basic employment sectors and includes all persons gainfully e m ployed over the age of 16. The details of this employment profile may be found in Figure 5. In addition, a second breakdown by sector wage has been developed to facilitate an in depth view of the total employment picture within the County. The employment profile by sector wage may also be found in Fi gure 5 A direct correlation exists between the magnitude of a disaster and the level of economic disruption su s tained by the County. The Co disaster unemployment rate will provide an excellent gauge for the evaluation of ec o nomic impact. Figure 8 provides the measures of income and labor force status per municipality. This includes a d e tailed view of the countywide unemployment s tatus and the per capita income of the work force. To evaluate the actual economic impact of a disaster on the community, a pre disaster benchmark on the ec onomic status of the community is required. Since the destruction of property is one of the effec ts of a disa s ter, a pre disaster verses post s ment tool. The average property values in the 35 municipalities comprising Miami Dade County may be found in Figure 8. Assumptions A m ajor or cat astrophic incident will overwhelm the capabilities of Miami Dade County and its munic ipalities to provide prompt and effective emergency response and short term recovery measures. If the situation is beyond the response or recovery capabilities of the County and the State, the Go vernor will request activation of the Federal Recovery Framework and that Federal resources, coord inated through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), will be deployed to the County to provide assistance. Transp ortation infrastructure will be damaged by major or cat astrophic incident and local transport ation services will be disrupted. Public utilities will be damaged and either fully or partially inoperable.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 54 of 237 Damage to commercial telecommunications facilities wil l be widespread and the ability of first r esponders and governmental and non governmental responders to communicate will be impaired. Homes, public buildings, and other critical facilities and equipment will be destroyed or severely da maged. Debris may m ake streets and highways impassable, making the movement of emergency resources difficult. Many county and municipal emergency personnel will be victims of the incident, preventing them from performing their assigned emergency duties. Numerous separate i ncidents subsequent to the initial incident will further complicate response and recovery operations. Many survivors may be displaced from their homes and large numbers of dead and injured could be expected. Many survivors will be in life threatening situa tions requiring immediate rescue and medical care. Hospitals, nursing homes, pharmacies and other medical facility stock will be damaged or d e stroyed, and those that do remain will have difficulty accommodating patient surge. o nomic prosperity and on the ability to move supplies and goods in and out of the county. Food processing and distribution capabilities will be severely damaged or destroyed. Damage and/or dest ruction of the built environment which generate, produce, use, store or dispose of hazardous materials could result in the release of hazardous materials into the environment. A major or cat astrophic incident will most likely create disruption of energy so urces and prolonged electric power failure. A major or cat CONCEPT OF O P ERATION S PART 1 National Incident Management S ystem (NIMS) / Incident Com mand Sy s tem (ICS) General NIMS i s a system mandated by Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 (HSPD 5) that provides a co nsistent nationwide approach for Federal, State, local and tribal governments; the private sector and non governmental organizations (NGOs) to work effectively a nd efficiently together to prepare for, r e spond to and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size or complexity. The NIMS ind i cates the core set of concepts, principles and terminology for interoperability and compatibility between multipl e jurisdictions as ou tlined in ICS. The management model followed by the Miami Dade Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is based on the principles of the Incident Command System (ICS). The ICS model has been recognized as the mo d el for the command, control and coordination of resources and personnel in response to an emergency. The ICS is d esigned to enable effective and efficient incident management by integrating the use of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures and communications operating within a common organizational structure. ICS princ iples and procedures require the use of common terminology, modular organization, integrated communic a-

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 55 of 237 tions, unified command structure, incident action planning, and manageable span of co n trol, as well as pre de signated facilities and comprehensive resource management. The ICS management is structured to facil itate activities in five major functional areas: command, operations, planning, logistics and admi n istration and finance The management model is used in the CEMP to organize both short term and long term oper a tions for a broad spectrum of emergencies, from small to complex incidents, natural and manmade. It is used by all levels of government federal, state, local and tribal, as well as many priva te and non governmental organizations. U sing ICS, multiple agencies and jurisdictions work together to accomplish the required r e sponse and recovery activities dictated by a disaster. These tasks are performed under the overall direction of the Incident Co mmander (i.e., the County Ma yor or designee). All participating agencies and jurisdictions contribute to the d etermination of the incident objectives and strategy via the incident action plan, and the optimal utilization of all available resources in an integrated manner. This flexible management method allows expansion or contra ction of response and recovery forces as dictated by the magnitude of the event. To summarize, the major tenets of the ICS are: 1. ICS utilizes a centralized, unified command s ystem that fosters multiple agencies to participate in the d ecision making process; 2. ICS can be adapted to a variety of organiz a tional structures, and as such, adapts easily to multi jurisdictional/multi agency involvement; 3. ICS may be used in any type of ha zard threat or disaster situation; and 4. ICS utilizes common terminology widely used and recognized by many responder organiz a tions. On March 9, 2006 the Miami Dade County Board of County Commission passed a resolution adopting NIMS /ICS principles as the C u ment and in the policies response age n cies. Levels of Disasters Miami Dade Emergency Management has developed a classification of events that are described in Fi g ure 10. Disaster events are classified into four category types: 1. Incident 2. Minor Disaster 3. Major Disaster 4. Catastrophic Disaster

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 56 of 237 Subpart A Miami Dade County Emergency Authority Miami Dade Emergency Management ( M DEM ) is responsible for the coordin ation of all countywide r e sponse efforts relative to disasters. The Miami Dade County Emergency Operations Ce n ter (EOC) is the facility in which all emergency and disaster preparations, response, and recovery activities are coordinated among the pa r ticipa ting agencies. Led by a County Mayor, Miami Dade County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners consis t ing of 13 elected Commissioners. During times of disaster, the County Ma yor has the authority, under Section 8B, Miami Dade County Code, to acco mplish whatever actions are nece s sary to protect lives and property from the threat. Disaster Assistance Employee Program The DAE Program classifies county employees who have been identified as non essential for their depar tments day to day operations im mediately following a disaster as EOC essential The EOC essential DAEs are reassigned throughout the County to assist in a variety of activities during the response and recovery phases of the disa s ter. Use of Miami Dade County Resources Resources owned o r controlled by Miami Dade County are used in emergency disaster operations and reco very activities when required. Government owned resources in excess of the needs of Miami Dade County, inclu ding its municipalities, are made known to the County and to th e State of Flo r ida Division of Emergency Management for possible use in any other area where needs exist. EOC Activation In some cases, u pon the recommendation of the MDEM Director to activate the EOC, a request is made to the Miami Dade County Mayor for a Declaration of a State of Local Emergency. In accordance with ord i nance 8B, the County Mayor is authorized to sign such a declaration at the request of the Director of Emergency Ma nagement The authorizing resolution and an unsigned copy of the declarat ion are maintained with M i ami Dade Emergency Management Upon activation of the EOC, the Mission Tracking and Message Control Center will be established to co n trol the flow of information received. The Incident Commander or a designee will closely monito r all messages requiring major actions to be taken to avoid duplication or conflicting instru c tions. The following persons are authorized to activate any portion of this plan: 1. The Governor of the State of Florida may, at his/her discretion, declare a sta te of emergency and act i vate this plan through the M i ami Dade County Mayor. 2. The Miami Dade County Mayor may, at his/her discretion, declare a state of emergency and activate any portion of this plan. Upon Declaration of a State of Local Emergency, the Cou nty Ma yor or a Designee may direct the evacuation of risk areas. At this time schools and business may be directed to cease ope rations until the emergency has passed.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 57 of 237 3. If a situation precludes the timely authorization by the Miami Dade County Mayor, the D i rector of Eme rgency Management will activate the plan and take such actions, authorized by this plan, as previously a pproved by the Miami Dade County Board of County Commissio n ers. In the event of an incident or disaster, the countywide Incident Commander direct s the overall manag e ment of all related activities including the development and i m plementation of strategy through incident action planning and approve s the ordering of and release of resources ( re fer to the Miami Dade EOC Activation SOP for add iti onal details ) Upon request of the EOC, county departments, and response agencies send representatives to the M i ami Dade EOC. Upon arrival, the representative(s) receive his/her assignment and an incident briefing. Some agencies may need to send more th an one representative if the agency is required to perform several fun ctions. Miami Dade Fire Rescue is the lead agency for two ESF s and the co lead for one. The number of re presentatives per agency is pre determined, dependent upon the type of haz ard. A policy group comprised of County Commission ers, appropriate department heads and other political off i cials may be assembled as an advisory group to the Incident Commander in order to provide assistance in the e stablishing policies. When activated, the Miami Dade Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is responsible for the following obje ctives: 1. Implement and manage incident response o p erations; 2. Implement and manage incident recovery o p erations; 3. Coordinate, and/or act as a liaison with appropriate federal, s tate, county and municipal governmental agencies, and the private sector; 4. Approve mutual aid requests; 5. Establish incident response and recovery o b jectives and strategy, the incident action plan; 6. Establish priorities and resolution of conflic t ing resource demands; and 7. Prepare and issue of emergency public info r mation. EOC Activation Levels The Miami Dade Emergency Operations Center (EOC) operates at one of three levels of read i ness in order to carry out its mission. These levels are described in Figure 11 and are patterned to closely match the Florida Division of Emergency Management ( F DEM) EOC activation levels to maintain consistent d e finitions. The M DEM is constantly monitoring the County for threats, unusual events, or situations. A n MDEM Duty O ffice r is on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and is advised of any such events by the Miami Dade Alarm Office, State Warning Point, concerned citizens, or other agencies. The Duty Officer also has the responsibi lity to monitor and follow up on any threat, unusual event, or situation that has the potential to impact Miami Dade County such as media reports, weather advisories, etc. It is important to note that since the MDEM is co n stantly monitoring the progression of events within the county, the EOC is alw ays considered activated. The expected or actual severity of the incident is paramount in determining the level of activation. The Dire c-

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 58 of 237 tor of the MDEM or designee has the responsibility for determining whether the MDEM should increase or d ecrease its le vel of activation. The purpose of activating the EOC as a result of a disaster is to centralize r esponse and recovery decisions, plans, and operational activities in order to maximize the efficie n cy, quality, and quantity of r e sources. Level Three: Monito ring & Assessment Level III is typically a monitoring and assessment phase where a specific threat, unusual event, or situ a tion, is actively monitored by the MDEM A Level III activation is an internal process for the MDEM and i n volves little, if any, int er agency direction or coordination. The threat, unusual event, or situation simply warrants observ ation, verification of appropriate action, and follow up by MDEM staff. Events or incidents that occur during Level III activation can generally be resolve d in a brief period of time by using a very small number of r esources. Level III activation does not require the MDEM to significantly alter its day to day operations or ma nagement stru c ture. Upon notification of the existence of a threat, unusual event or situation, the MDEM Duty Officer ev a luates the situation, and, if conditions warrant, notifies the MDEM Director or designee. Appropriate agencies are aler ted, advised of the situation, and instructed to take appropriate action as part of their every day respo n sibilities. At the conclusion of the event, the Duty Officer verifies completion of the actions taken and documents the inc i dent. At times, it is appropriate to hold briefings or staff meetings to respond to, or mitigate the situation, but no I nc ident Action Plan (IAP) is developed and distributed. Other MDEM coordinators may become i n volved but the Duty Officer will remain the pr i mary point of contact for MDEM Level Two: Partial Level II activation is typically limited agency activa tion. MD EM staff and appropriate E S F lead age n cies with a role in the incident response are activated and required to report to the EOC. All other ESFs are alerted of the event and are on standby. The purpose of Level II activation is to initiate preparations du e to a significant threat of a disaster or to coordinate response due to the occurrence of a minor disas ter. During Level II activ ation, the EOC may be operational 24 hours a day. During Level II activation, the MDEM dissemi nates information to, and begi n s to coordinate prepar a tion and response actions with, external agencies, Municipal Branch Representatives, and Miami Dade County d epartments tasked in emergency r e sponse. The incident command system (ICS) is implemented and the five (5) sections along w ith the branches are activated. The EOC Command Staff develops and impl e ments an Incident Action Plan (IAP). The Incident Action Plan is the work plan for everyone, including the Mayor and his/her staff. The EOC personnel are briefed on the IAP and pert inent items are posted on the EOC status boards. In most cases, the Mission Tr acking & Me s sage Control Center Geographic Information Systems (GIS) services, and the Public In formation (ESF 1 4) are act ivated. Depending upon the event, any appropriate log istical support elements such as security, food unit, 311 etc. are also activated. Level One: Full Scale

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 59 of 237 In a full scale activation, the EOC is activated on a 24 hour schedule due to an imminent threat or occu r rence of a disaster. All MDEM staff and all ESFs are activated and required to report to the EOC. Munic i pal Branch Representatives are also in place in the EOC. The ICS is implemented and all sections and branches are a ctivated. As in Level II activation, the IAP establishes the operational obje ctives and priorities of the incident. Additionally, all logistical support elements are activa t ed. At this level response, relief, and recovery operations are expected to last for an extended period of time. A dditional support or back up staff, includin g representatives from the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management ( F DEM) and/or the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is notified and avai l able to assist should the response escalate and exceed local capabil i ty. EOC Structure The Mi ami Dade EOC utilizes a bottom up approach in all phases of emergency management, with emerge ncy activities resolved at the lowest appropriate level of government. The resources of depar t mental, agency, municipal, county, state, and the federal government s are utilized in sequential order to insure a rapid and eff icient r e sponse. The Miami a tional structure depicted in Figure 12. The Incident Commander who appoints command staff leads this organiz ation: Section Chiefs, Branch Directors and a Public Information Officer (PIO). The Section Chiefs, typically MDEM staff or department heads, appoint subordinate staff. Branch Directors are also MDEM staff, whereas, ESF l ea d a gencies are pre determined pursuant to this plan. There are five major co mp o nents of the Miami Dade EOC Incident Command System. These five components carry out the management respo n sibilities of the EOC: 1) Incident Command : a) The County M ayor or design ee usually the Director of Miami Dade Emergency Management holds the position of Incident Commander. The Incident Commander has overall responsibility for managing the entire incident. b) In addition, the Incident Commander is responsible for activities su ch as developing and impl e menting strategies, the ordering and release of resources, the provision if information to internal and external stakeholders and establishing and maintaining liaisons with other agencies participating in the inc ident. 2) Operations Section : a) The operations section is responsible for the management of all operations directly applicable to the primary mission. b) Th e Operations Section C hief activates and supervises organizational elements in accordance with the IAP and directs its executi on. 3) Planning and Information Section : a) The Planning and I nformation section is responsible for the collection, evaluation, and dissemination of information about the incident and the status of resources. 4) Logistics Section :

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 60 of 237 a) The Logistics S ection is responsi ble for providing facilities, services, and material in support of the r esponse and recovery operations. b) The Logistics Section C hief participates in the development of the incident action plan and activates and supervises the units within the logistics sec tion. 5) Administrative/Finance Section : a) The Administrative/Finance S ection is responsible for the organization, management, and oper a tion of activities related to the administrative and fiscal aspects of the event. These activities are admini stered within the guidelines, policies, and constraints, established by the Incident Commander and ot her agencies such as the county finance department, and state and federal agencies (e.g., FEMA). EOC Branches The Miami Dade EOC is organized so that maximum advantage c an be made of the many interdiscipl i nary skills and resources that exist on an everyday basis throughout county departments and outside support o rganizations. As illustrated in the EOC Table of Organization (see Figure 12 ) in order to maintain a proper s pan of control, these agencies, based on the type of normal services they perform, are a r ranged into three distinct fun c tionally oriented groups: Infrastructure; Human Services; Public Safety ; and Municipal. Each agency representative serves as the prim ary contact and coordinator for his/her respective agency within one of the three branches. The representative may also serve the role as lead or su p port ESF As such, the responsibilities of this individual exceed simple representation and coordination of his/her respe c activities. The MDEM has assigned staff to each branch. During activations, as well as throughout the year, the Branch Director is responsible for coordination of the inte r active efforts of all the members of the branch. B ranch Directors maintain a line of communication with the Operations Section Chief for requesting and r epor t ing on incident objectives and response/recovery actions. Branch Directors are expected to co m municate with and request information from the Logist ics, Planning and Information, and Administrative/Finance Se ctions. The role of each branch is to: 1. Work jointly to devise solutions for identified or projected problems; 2. Work jointly to capitalize on opportunities to share information, professional and te chnical skills, and pe rsonnel and equipment; 3. Work together to track the collective status and actions of the branch; 4. Anticipate upcoming needs, potential problems and solutions that relate to the branch; 5. Provide and/or coordinate requested support for bran ch members; and 6. Advise support agencies of decisions, actions, and instructions. Infrastructure Branch

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 61 of 237 The Infrastructure Branch is responsible for monitoring and coordinating communications, response and r ecovery actions relative to flooding, drainage mat ters, debris clearance, damage assessment, critical facil i ties, utilities, transportation, and eng i neering. Human Services Branch The Human Services Branch is responsible for monitoring and coordinating mass care, medical services, di saster mental health, and environmental & public health. The Human Services Branch assist s as nece s sary, state and federal agencies in providing individual and family disaster relief offered through disa s ter assistance pr o grams. Public Safety Branch The Public Safety Branc h is responsible for monitoring and coordinating fire/rescue, USAR, hazardous mater ials, law enforcement, security, traffic activities, evacuation and re entry, and a number of activities pr o vided through mutual aid. Municipalities and Municipal Branch EOC s In order to facilitate effective coordination and communication between Miami Dade County and its 35 munic ipalities, the municipalities have been grouped into seven div i sions. Each division has identified a host city to act as the liaison with the Miami Dade EOC during times of disaster. The host cities are commonly known as Divisions with a selected municipal branch representative and the cities within their division are commonly known as Satellite EOCs. Each of the 35 municipalities within Miami Dade County is responsible for planning and responding to events occurring within its jurisdiction. When emergencies or disasters occur in which municipalities e x haust their resources, they may call upon the assistance of their Divisional Representative or M i ami Dade County. The Municipal Branch Representatives are included in the Operations Section of the Miami Dade EOC Municipal ities are encouraged to participate in the statewide mutual aid agreement for disaster r e sponse and recovery and are aware that t hey must submit requests for mutual aid through the Mi ami Dade EOC. A MDEM coord inator is responsible for interacting with Municipal Branch Representatives to assist with i s sues and requests.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 62 of 237 The Municipal Branch Representatives are r e sponsible for: 1. Mon itoring and coordinating the response and recovery activities of the various assigned municipal i ties through the Municipal Branch EOC chain of command. 2. Providing or coordinating requested support for municipal branches and satellite municipalities. 3. Working closely with other members of the Command Section to capitalize on opportunities to share i nformation, professional and technical skills, and personnel and equipment. 4. Working jointly as a municipal branch and with their respective counterparts to devise s olutions for ident ified or projected problems. 5. Working together to track the collective status and actions of the municipal branches and satellite munic ipalities. 6. Anticipating upcoming needs and potential pro b lems. 7. Informing municipal branches and satellit e municipalities of executive decisions, actions, and instru c tions. Subpart B State of Florida Roles and Responsibilities T he State of Florida through the Division of Emergency Management ( F DEM) acts to support and suppl e ment Miami efforts. F DEM supports the local response efforts through the activ a tion of the F DEM may activate the State Eme rgency Operations Center (SEOC) to an appropriate level based on the expected c ond i tions of the disaster. If the disaster is imminent, the Governor is likely to i s sue an Executive Order declaring a state of emergency. The Executive Order specifies the supplies, equipment, and pe r sonnel the state can deploy to assist Miami Dade Coun ty. If the Governor is not able to issue an Executive Order due to time constraints, the Director of e sponse actions. When the state activates the SEOC, the Governor ap point s a State Coordinating Officer (SCO) who in turn appoint s a Deputy SCO for response. The Deputy SCO for response designate s the State Emergency R esponse Team (SERT) leader, an Operations Chief, Information and Pla n ning Chief, and support staff. The SERT is grouped into functional groups known as Emergency Support Functions (ESFs). The SERT can d eploy the resources of its various agencies to support and supplement the response efforts at the county level. The nature of the emergency determine s which are activated to support Miami Dade The State send s a SERT liaison, usually the F DEM Area Coordinator, to Miami Dade County in order to pr ovide a personal communication link with the SEOC. The SERT liaison offer s his/her technical assi s tance and is responsible for relaying r e source requests from Miami Dade County to the SEOC. Responsibilities of the State of Florida include: 1. Receive, evaluate, and issue information on emergency operations. 2. Coordinate the a ctivities of all state agencies. 3. Coordinate the receipt, allocation, and delivery of resources supplied by the state or federal gover n ment or other states.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 63 of 237 4. Coordinate emergency operations mutual aid with other states. 5. Receive, process and transmit requests for m u tual aid or state/federal assistance. Statewide Assistance The State of Florida provides assistance to i m pacted counties when the resources of the affected county and its municipalities have been exhausted. Requests for and deployment of resources a re approved and coord inated by the State Emergency Response Team (SERT). The Statewide Mutual Aid Agreement for Emergency Response/Recovery is the pr i mary system that the State employs to support the county level disaster response. All counties and munic ipalities within the State of Flo rida are authorized to enter into mutual aid agreements for emergency assistance. Those parti c ipating have the ability to access emergency resources throughout the State of Florida and also agree to make resources wit hin th eir jurisdiction available to others in need, to the extent possible. Miami Dade County has signed and adopted the Statewide Mutual Aid Agreement. Through the statewide Mutual Aid Agreement, the SERT can coordinate mutual aid requests from the a f fected c ounties. When utilizing this service, Miami Dade County make s every effort to locate the d e sired resource and identify the location, contact name, and contact telephone number of the resource to the SERT. Assistance is provided in the form of Rapid Respon se Teams (RRT) or Rapid Impact Assessment Teams (RIAT). RIATs are composed of non affected county/state emergency manag e ment and other emergency tin g with local officials, an assessment of transportation, communications, and utility systems is co m pleted to determine resources required. An assessment of food, water, health, medical, and housing needs is also a ccomplished. State Agencies Many state agen cies provide assistance to Miami Dade County and its municipalities in response to inc i dents on a day to day basis. Florida Department of Transportation (F.D.O.T), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and the Florida Department of Children and Families are example s of some state agencies that provide assistance. When the Miami Dade EOC is activated, those state agencies that have operating locations in Miami Dade County are considered local resources, and are assigned r e sponsibilities under this plan. If state agen cies are asked to provide staff members to the Miami Dade EOC, the State of Florida Division of Emergency Manag ement ( F DEM) must be not i fied. Subpart C Federal Government Roles and Responsibil i ties The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is the a gency responsible for coordinating the r esources and personnel of the federal government involved in assisting local governments in disaster r e sponse activ i ties.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 64 of 237 FEMA administers a variety of programs that support state and local governments in their ef forts to i m prove emergency preparedness, mitigation, r e sponse, and recovery capabilities. The federal government may not interface directly with the County or any of its munici palities. The role of lia i son i s performed by the State of Florida. Federal As sistance The Federal Government provides assistance to a f fected communities when the capabilities of the local and state governments are exhausted. The State Emergency Response Team (SERT) advise s FEMA R e gion IV that a formal request for federal assistanc e has been submitted. FEMA de ploys a FEMA Lia i son to the SEOC. If a presidential declaration is imminent, an Emergency Response Team (ERT) is de p loyed. SERT members coordinate directly with counterpart federal ESF representatives and federal ERT members who are a s signed to the SEOC. Federal Agencies Some federal agencies provide assistance to Miami Dade County and its municipalities in response to an inc ident or event. During an activation of the EOC, certain federal agencies are pr e sent depending on the type of event. Agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or Federal Emergency Management Age ncy (FEMA) are examples of two federal agencies that are involved if necessary PART 2 RESPONSE ACTIONS Subpart A Notification and Warning G eneral Different threats generate different response a c tions and in some cases, such as hurricanes, the level and type of response varies according to the ability to properly notify and warn the popul a tion. Local Warning Points Primary The primary 24 ho ur Miami Dade County Warning Point is located at the Miami Dade Data Pr o cessing and Communications Center (DPCC) located at 5680 S.W. 87 th Avenue, Miami, Florida. Emergency 911 o p erators receive emergency notifications 24 hours a day through traditional l and line telephone communication. Ded iSATCOM) is located at the Dispatch Center to receive notific a tions from the State Warning Point. In addition, a dedicated land li Power Plant. The Miami Dade Emergency Management also maintains a parallel warning system at the Miami Dade Eme rgency Operations Center (EOC) located at 9300 NW 41 st Street, Miami, Florida. This system is mon i tored only during normal business hours. However, the MDEM maintains an on call Duty Officer avail a ble 24 hours/day at (305) 468 5800.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 65 of 237 Local Warning Points Secondary Secondary E SATCOM stati ons are located at the National Hurricane Center/Miami Weather Service, and two radio stations, WQBA and WIOD. Notification of significant events to all municipal branch represent a tives and satellite EOC s is acco m plished by email, t elephone or fax. Mia mi Dade County Police and Fire Dispatch radio frequencies have transmit and receive capabilities that are compatible with all local and municipal p o lice and fire frequencies. Warning and Status Updates The MDEM provides notifications of an event as early a s is practical in an effort to provide as much a d vance warning as possible. Notification, warning, and event updates are accomplished in a number of ways depen ding on the circumstances surrounding the incident. In the case of a tropical storm or hurr i can e, the MDEM staff begins the notification process three to five days prior to the anticipated arrival of the storm. Events for which no warning is possible are handled in the most expeditious manner, either by radio, tel e phone, or fax. The MDEM maintains a comprehensive emergency contact database containing names, affiliations, office te lephone numbers, home telephone numbers, fax, beeper numbers and 24 hour contact numbers. This dat abase is maintained and u p dated on a continuing basis. The MDEM employs the use of a blast fax and email service, which has the capability of simultaneously faxing and emailing notifications and updates to over 250 agencies, municipalities, and organiz a tions. The typical broadcast fax or email for a storm event includes a ma p of the storm forecast positions, a tentative time schedule for the storm, and a schedule of anticipated a c tions to be taken by Miami Dade County assuming a The MDEM web site is also routinely updated to provide the latest info r mati on in order to notify and warn the public. MDEM has created a program to simplify the notification process to all Miami Dade County Department Dire ctors and employees through the Department P ersonnel Representative (DP R ). MDEM advise s the D PR via e mail of the incident or the disaster and they in turn are responsible for forwarding this information to their D epartment Director and employees. In an effort to keep the state informed of all emergency a c tions, the MDEM includes the State EOC in all of its e mergency notifications. Miami Dade County also provides information to the State through the E High Frequency ( HF ) r a dio transmission. Once the EOC is fully activated, each agency representative is provided with an unpublished tel e phone line that can be utilized to communicate with other agencies. These agencies may also communicate with rad i os. All EOC representatives are provided with updated status information on a timely basis. Notificati on and st atus updates are provided to the general public through the electronic and print media. Public Information O fficers (PIOs) from the Office of Communication s are assigned to the EOC du r ing any activation. The PIO insure s that the media co rrectly informs the public regarding the circumstances su r rounding an incident or disaster by monitoring radio and television broadcasts, scheduling press conferences, and issuing news r eleases. The PIO utilizes the media for the purpose of notifying the people of Miami Dade County of any pote ntial eme r gency.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 66 of 237 In the event that immediate dissemination of information to the public becomes ne c essary, the EOC has the capability of using the Emergency Alert System (EAS) to alert the general population by radi o and tel e vision. Turkey Point Warning System A system of strategically placed siren/ loudspeakers is in place to provide Emergency Public Information du ring a Turkey Point nuclear incident. The sirens and public address systems are used for notification of a n uclear plant emergency to the public at large for a radius of 10 miles around the nuclear power plant. A Map of the siren locations may be found in Figure 2 1 The Mayor or Emergency Management Director authorizes the activation of the Turkey Point Warning Sy s tem as well all press and EAS message releases concerning public information. For more information, please refer to the Tu r key Point Procedures maintained at MDEM Special Populations The hearing impaired receives emergency public information t hrough open/closed captioning pr o vided by the local television stations. The Florida Relay Service provide s updated emergency information for dissemin a tion to their clients. Emergency Public Information is provided in English, Spanish and Haitian Creole t hrough television and radio stations. All radio and television stations dedicated to the service of Haitian Creole and Spanish communities are included in the Miami Dade EOC Broa d cast Fax System. Other Notification Procedures 1. Using established marine f requencies, marine specific information and warnings are dissem i nated by the U.S. Coast Guard. 2. Under certain circumstances, fire rescue units may be dispatched to mobile home facilities and public parks to notify residents and visitors of a potential threa t. 3. Many residents, businesses, organizations, schools, and municipal governments also obtain notific a tions and warnings through NOAA weather radios. Subpart B Evacuation and Sheltering Evacuation Evacuation estimate figures are feasible for hurricane an d Turkey Point evacuations but all other evacu a tions for other types of disasters are extremely variable. Estimates of population, pre designated evacu a tion routes and clearance times for affected areas of Miami Dade County for pre determined evacuation areas are pr esented in the Hurricane Evacuation and Reentry Annex located in Volume III of the CEMP. Residential Health Care Facilities (RHCFs) MDEM coordinates the evacuation of stretcher bound patients in order to maximize the use of ambulan c es. Each ye ar, hospitals and nur s ing homes are required to submit their census to help MDEM in the pre planning of resources. The census information includes licensed bed capacity and average facility capacity. These numbers help MDEM in all o cating an adequate amou nt of vehicles and in estimation of evacuation start times.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 67 of 237 The census information is su p plemented by polling of impacted or potentially impacted facilities at the time of an incident by ESF 8 lead and support agencies. Th e supplemental information obtai ned includes the amount of critical, serious, and stable patients. Normally, the number of patients requiring evacuation by a m bulance exceeds the capability of Miami available local inventory of ambulances. In order to transport these patients safely within the clea r ance time available, it is sometimes necessary to request ambulances from other areas. For planning purposes, it is cu rrently estimated that 36 48 hours is required to secure additional ambulances and use them to complete p atient evacua tion All Residential Health Care Facilities (RHCF) are required by State Statute to submit for approval their CEMP to Miami Dade E mergency Management All RHCFs must demonstrate adequate evacuation plans that i nclude transportation and receiving f acility agre e ments in their CEMP. National Disaster Medical System In the event that evacuation of the health care facilities exceeds local and regional resources the EOC will r equest F ederal assistance through the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). The NDMS is a federa l ly coordinated system that augments the Nation's medical response capability. The overall purpose of the NDMS is to supplement an integrated National medical response capability for assisting State and local a uthorities in dealing wit h the medical impacts of major incidents. Principally, the NDMS may be activa t ed to support patient reception and disposition of patients to hospitals when an evacuation is o r dered The NDMS is coordinated locally by the Miami Veterans Affairs Healthcare System. In the event that the NDMS is needed to support evacuations the EOC Incident Commander will requests its activ a tion through ESF 8. Schools M DEM maintains an agreement with Miami Dade County Public Schools (MDCPS) that indicate s the pr ocess for clo s ing of schools prior to an incident or disaster This agreement also indicates the use of certain schools as Medical Evacuation Centers ( M ECs), Hurricane Evacuation Centers (HECs), and Radiological Emergency Evacu a tion Centers. When conside ring the use of these facilities, the Superintendent of Schools participate s in the deve l opment of the evacuation schedule and approve s closure times for all schools prior to the issuance of an evacuation order. In developing the evacuation schedule the f ollowing must be consi d ered : 1. the normal A.M bus schedule, 2. 3. time required to staff and prepare the facility for use as a HEC. Businesses Consideration is given to designating a sp e cific time for businesses within an evacuation zone to close and evacuate personnel. This time is usually subsequent to the issuance of a general evacuation order but pr i or to the advent of tropical storm force winds. It is the policy of Miami Dade E mergency Management to refrain from issuing a mandatory evacuation order for businesses until absolutely necessary in an effort to ma x imize the available resources to the general public prior to the incident or di s aster.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 68 of 237 Mobile Home Parks Miami Dade Count y has over 7 0 mobile home parks All residents of mobile home parks in Miami Dade Cou nty are strongly urged to evacuate during all tropical storm events This urging is made r e gardless of whether or not they are located in any of the storm surge evacuati on zones. Figure 1 9 provides a co m plete listing of all the m o bile home parks in Miami Dade County. Sheltering General Population Shelters can be selected for a variety of evacuation circumstances. For hurricanes, facilities must meet stru ctural criter ia to withstand the high winds. Facilities must also be located outside of areas where storm surge and flooding may occur. The basic criterion for hurricane evacuation center selection is outlined i n the American Red Cross (ARC) pu bGuidelines The Florida Division of Emergency Manag ement ( F DEM ) has developed an in depth manual based on these criteria. This document is the primary met hod used in the evaluation of buil d ings for use as HECs. In additio n to the structural survey, the local ARC chapter conducts a mass care survey. The Red Cross d etermines the shelter capacity based on the recommended useable space outlined in the structural su r vey. The total capacity is then calculated by dividing the t otal square footage of useable space by 20 square feet per person. Hurricane evacuation centers are divided into two categories: primary and secondary. Primary HECs are those facilities that have the highest capacities, kitchen facilities, and are centra lly located. Miami Dade Cou nty Pu b lic Schools (MDCPS) stocks the primary HECs with a two day supply of food and water at the beginning of each hurricane season. The remaining schools are considered secondary sites. Each year prior to hurr icane season, t he ARC, MDEM and MDCPS collectively identify and list appropriate HECs for the year. This list is distributed to the public through print media and brochures. HECs that are compliant with the accessibi lity criteria outlined in the U.S. Department of Just ice, Americ ans with Disabilities Act, ADA Checklist for Eme rgency Shelters are identified on the main list. Figure 2 2 provides the names and locations of the HECs cu rrently available in M i ami Dade County. Sheltering Each agen cy within Miami Dade County is individually responsible for the identification, inspection, and prov ision of shelter space for its employees. Each ident i fied shelter location will meet ARC 4496 criterion and be ADA accessible. However, the registration pr ocess remains the same. Those wishing to use a county e mployee facility will be required to register and sign a basic hold harmless agreement. Each shelter is available 8 hours prior to the advent of tropical storm force winds and remain s open 48 hours a fter the cessation of tro pical storm force winds. Emergency Evacuation Assistance Program (EEAP) M DEM maintains a registry for people who may need special assistance in case of an emergency evacu a tion. Individuals requiring basic nursing care, assistance with activities of daily living, or that are electrically and/or

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 69 of 237 oxygen dependent would qualify for this program To apply for assistance, an individual must complete an application form that includes a medical diagnosis and include s a a ture. The services available to EEAP clients are generally all hazards oriented. Special arrangements are made to address countywide emergencies such as evacuations for hurricanes and nuclear power plant emerge n cies. The sheltering program consists of Hurrica ne Evacuation Centers (HECs), Medical Evacuation Centers ( M ECs) and Medical Management Facilities (MMFs). Only those people that use life sustaining medical equipment are bed confined o r in critical condition are assigned to an MMF. All others are assig ned to a HEC or M EC. Staffing for M ECs is obtained from Miami Dade County Health Department (MDCHD), Jackson Memorial Ho spital (JMH) and county employees from the Di s aster Assistance Employee (DAE) program. Transportation services are provided to people who indicate a need on their application. A door to door se rvice picks clients up at their home and brings them back to their home once the emergency is over. Specia lized transportation for wheelchairs is also available. People requiring ambulance tran s portation are carefully screened. Contracted p rivate ambulances provide transport ation services with support from local and munic ipal fire departments as necessary. The evacuation and assistance of individuals on the registry is conducted based upon the impending or actual event. The procedures for the registry, evacuation, transportation and sheltering programs are d e tailed in the Miami Dade EEAP SOP located in Volume II of the CEMP Pet Friendly Evacuation Centers Sunshine Pavilion at the Miami Dade County Tamiami Fairgrounds and Dr. Michael Krop Senior High are de signated as P et friendly H urricane E vacuation C enters (PHEC) Pet owners must pre register in order to use the facility. Miami Dade County with its Disaster Assistance Employees (DAE) over sees the human popul ation at the evacuation center while Miami area. Refer to the PHEC Plan in the ESF 17 (Animal Protection & Agriculture) SOP for more in fo r mation. Transportation Miami Dade Tr ansit Agency operates public transportation buses to pre designated evacuation pick up points for hurricanes and Turkey Point evacuations. Depending on a variety of factors such as size of event, number of people to be evacuated, time frame, and time of d ay, MDT gather s its resources and r e spond accordingly. Subpart C Needs Assessment Preliminary Damage Assessment Teams The purpose of this section is to outline the schedule, assignments, and methods to be employed by M i ami Dade County, Florida DEM and the Florida National Gua rd (FNG) for the deployment of Preliminary Da m age A s sessment (PDA) Teams. PDA Teams are established to assist local government in conducting a timely and acc u rate needs assessment. PDA T eams deployment and the use of these procedures are presumed to be an activity in response to a major or catastrophic disaster. Once it has been determined that the County does

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 70 of 237 not possess the resources needed to effectively assess the damage or, if there is the intent to request a n emergency or disas ter declaration, outside assistance will be re quested from the state. However, t he County Mayor may request assistance from outside the County with a local disaster decl a ration. If a local disaster declaration is issued, the Mayor submits a request for a ssistance to the G overnor through the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management ( F DEM). F DEM dispatches a Preliminary Damage A s sessment Team that is supported by the Florida National Guard and the County. The PDA Team mission is to identify needs and overall impact of the event rather than to assess damage. An assessment of public needs is d e termined based on the PDA Team findings for the areas requiring priority assistance a nd damage to the infr a structure. Deployment of Preliminary Damage Asses s ment Teams The deployment of PDA T eams is scheduled with the Miami Dade EOC. A site that has been surveyed for damage and obstructions will be chosen. In the event EOC/FDEM communications are not o p erational, the Rapid Impact Assessment Team ( RIAT ) land s on the ramp at M i ami International Airport (MIA) The other primary landing zone is the Miami Dade County Tamiami Fairgrounds, which is located to the south of the Tamiami Trail (U S 41) and east of the Florida T urnpike. If a clear picture of the needs of the victims has already been established, the primary mission of the PDA Teams i s the verification of those needs and the relay of that information to the SEOC. If, however, needs a s sessments are still being conducted, the M DEM Director will request P DA Team assistance. In this case, the PDA Team is combined with a Miami Dade Police and Fire Rescue unit to coordinate any remaining a ssignments. Subpart D Other Mutual Aid The response to and the recovery from a declared incident or disaster may requir e the utilization of r e sources over and above those held by Miami In order to access additional r esources that may be required it is necessary to enter into agreements with other cou n ties and their attendant agencies. These agreements accomplish three primary goals: 1. Identify the resource(s) to be a c cessed; 2. Provide reasonable assurance that those resources will be made avai l able when required; and 3. Provide terms for compensation for the use of those r e sources. Emerg ency utilization of the resources and capabilities of organizations and agencies that are not part of M iami Dade County government is pre arranged through mutual aid agreements and memorandums of unde rstanding to the maximum extent possible. Such agreemen ts are entered into by duly authorized county off icials and are formulated in writing. Agreements include a clear statement regarding payment or reimburs ement for personnel services, equipment costs, and the return of materials. All mutual aid agre e ments conform to and are part of the state mutual aid pr o gram.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 71 of 237 Miami Dade County is a participating county in the statewide mutual aid program and all municipalities unde rstand that requests for mutual aid must be submitted through the Miami Dade EOC. The Dir ector of Eme rgency Management or his/her designee is responsible for the administration, coordination, and monito r ing of all mutual aid agreements within M i ami Dade County. Facility Life Support Systems Back up electrical power is provided to the Miami Dad e Emergency Operations Center through several sources. Two independent power feeds exist from two different power sub stations. The facility is equipped with two 2.2 megawatt back up ge n erators cooled with well water from adjacent wells. Three 12,000 gal lon fuel tanks are capable of su p plying fuel for 30 days. All back up generators are checked under load twice a month. The EOC is equipped with a full back up battery through uninterrupted power system (UPS) which is cap a ble of maintaining power for a ful l 30 minutes. Two 300 ton chiller units and an off peak 140 ton chiller are cap able of maintaining the temperature within the EOC. Any of the three are capable of maintaining the inside air temperature to less than 80 Fahre n heit. PART 3 RECOVERY AND MITIG A TION ACTIONS The recovery phase of an emergency or disaster deals with the functional restoration of a comm u nity to the conditions prior to the disaster event. The recovery phase includes but is not li m ited to the following: The restoration of inf rastructure including roads, traffic controls, signs, canals, railroads, airports, shipping facilities, fuel supplies, potable water supplies, electricity, sewage disposal, storm drains, and flood co ntrol facil i ties. The restoration of public safety measur es including fire suppression, law enforcement, and search and re s cue. The restoration of human services including the provision of health and medical services, environme n tal and public health concerns, and the provision of services to people, including th ose with special needs. General Recovery Functions 1. M DEM through its EOC Infrastructure Branch Director is responsible for the coordination of short term recovery efforts within Miami Dade County. 2. The convening of the Post Disaster Recovery Committee to ini tiate long term recovery actions. 3. Before the establishment of a Joint F ield O ffice ( J FO) recovery activities are coordinated through the EOC. Recovery activities include preliminary damage assessment, coordinated debri s strategy and d ebris clearance as well as the coordination of business recovery actions. 4. In the event of an emergency that is followed by a major disaster declar a tion (as described in 44 CFR) requiring the establishment of a JFO Miami Dade Emergency Management through the EOC Infrastru ct ure Branch Director and the Municipal Branch Representative become the liaison between the County and its municipalities and the state and federal representatives assigned to the J FO. This is also true relative to the implementation of Essential Services Centers, Disaster Recovery Centers Preliminary Damage Assessment teams, staging areas, and other sites.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 72 of 237 5. In the event of an emergency that is not followed by a disaster declaration, M DEM initially coordinate s with the appropriate agencies for assignments u ntil essential services are re s tored. 6. The established liaison between M DEM recovery staff and F DEM is the Deputy SERT Chief for recovery. The Deputy SERT Chief for recovery will be designated as the Deputy State Coordinating Officer (DSCO). The rea 7 coordinator may serve as an alternate to the DSCO Transition from Response to Recovery The transition from response activities to reco v ery may not be clear. The return to an evacuated area may be an extended period of time due to: 1. Uni nhabitable co nditions caused by flooding or building collapse 2. Lack of access or essential services such as blocked roadways, lack of water, sewer, or electricity. Agencies responsible for recovery functions must be activated and ready to perform assigned functions before the response phase is finished. There is a marked difference in the action required during the in i tial or short term recovery phase, and the extended or long term recovery phase The different phases occur simultaneously throughout the community. Some neighborhoods functioning normally; others strug gle through the short term recovery phase, due to a lack of essential services. Simultaneously, other neig hborhoods ad dress long term recovery projects, such as road rebuil d ing and repair. Short Term Recovery Phase The short term recovery phase immediately follows the disaster event and entails the immediate, even if te mporary, efforts to allow a return to normal life. The community may still be under emergency conditions if e ssential services have no t been restored. Cond i tions for extending the emergency period during the short term recovery phase i n clude: 1. Residents are still in shelters. 2. Water or sewer systems are inoper a tive. 3. Electricity is not available. 4. There is a shortage of food, water, and ot her basic goods. 5. Curfew is in effect. 6. Re entry is not possible because of d e bris or severe damage. The recovery process begins with an initial damage assessment conducted by Miami Dade personnel u s ing aircraft, ground vehicles, observer call ins and the S napshot Program noted below. The size and type of inc ident and its overall impact on the community will determine who should participate in the damage assessment process. Minor emergencies or incidents may only require participation of local county agenci es and organiz ations. Municipal involvement is outlined in the Municipal Branch EOC SOP. Miami i ous degrees of da m age are placed throughout the County at fire an d police stations, county facilities and in private homes. Each person reporting calls in damage reports to a telephone nu m ber printed on the card and this information is automatically entered into a computer database that collates the data and yields a m apped re presentation of the damages thereby providing a quick assessment of overall i m pact.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 73 of 237 Oversight of short term recovery falls within the responsibilities of the EOC Operations Section Chief through the Branch Directors. Re entry criteria can be foun d in the Hurricane Evacuation and Reentry Annex located in Volume III of this CEMP. The evacuation plan provides for the use of inspectors from Miami Dade Regul atory and Economic Resources Department (RER), as well as Miami Dade Fire Rescue Department sea rch and rescue personnel for structural evaluation during the re entry pr o cess. During the short term recovery phase, an accurate and complete economic assessment is highly unlik e ly, as the total extent of damage will not be immediately available. Initia l estimates of damage from canvas s ing the affected areas and estimating the costs of repair based on past experience. The in i tial damage assessment determine s if an emergency declaration is wa r ranted. Disaster Declaration If the governor determines the st ate require s federal assistance in dealing with an incident or disaster, a r ea M DEM represent ative who is responsible for c o A list of the communities to be i n spected; The names and addresses of all l o cal contacts; A population count; A list of damaged facilities with their locations and cost e st i mates; The annual budget, after debt service, for the County and each of its munic i palities; The current budget status of each; Maps which may be used to show da m aged sites; and Vehicles, tools and other items necessary to carry out the PDA The federal state, and county teams jointly verify the extent of damages attribu t able to the disaster and submit estimates thereof to the FEMA regional director. The recommendations are then submitted to the FEMA n ational director in Washington, who in turn prepare s a recommendation to the President of the United States. At such time, the president may issue a Disaster Declar a tion. Appropriate Miami Dade County officials are responsible for pro viding the state with an assessment of their capability to effectivel y handle the recovery effort. This assessment include s where possible, how the da mages are to be repaired; where possible, a projected schedule for completion and a recommend a tion as to the source of funding for the count share of the recovery costs. Habitability life safety issues are determined by qualified structural engineers from county staff such as the Regulatory and Economic Resources Department (RER) o r from local contractors to the Miami Dade Fire Rescue Urban Search and Rescue Team. During a large scale disaster, the short term recovery, and some of the long term recovery activities is coord inated from a FEMA J FO. Local, state and federal officials operate from this facility until all required reco v ery projects are addressed. Basic staffi ng is planned in accordance with the guidelines provided in the National R e sponse Framework

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 74 of 237 Non Declared Disaster Event Miami Dade Emergency Management and all partner agencies are required to respond to all life safety issues regardless the ability to ob tain financial reimbursement from the state and/or federal governments. The pr otection of life and property remains the highest priority for the commitment of resources. Long Term Recovery Phase Long term recovery is defined as the point at which repa irs are permanent rather than temporary. After the basic essentials are restored and victims have returned to their homes or other permanent housing, the neig hborhood must rebuild the infrastru c ture and economy to at least a pre event level. Activities i nclude demolition of dangerously damaged structures, debris removal, repair or reconstruction of water and sewer systems, roads, bridges and other public facilities as well as the repair or reco n struction of private property. The first step in the long t erm recovery process following a declared emergency or disaster is to schedule an a meeting conducted by a representative of the State for all potential applicants for public assistance grants. all parties are informed of the eligibility requir e ments application procedures, administrative requirements, funding and program eligibility criteria to receive fe d eral and state assistance. M DEM will undertake to notify as many potential applicants as possible i n cluding advertising the applicant briefing in local newspapers. Potential applicants include state and county departments, municipal ities, Indian tribes, and certain private not for profit (PNPs) organizations. A list of most potential applicants is inc luded in the appendix of the Local Mitigation Strategy (LMS). All applicants who believe they may be elig ible will be asked to prepare a Request for Public Assistance (FEMA Form 90 49). the Miami Dade Department of Finance assumes the primary responsibility for coordinating the County activities required by the Public Assistance Program, including oversight of Project Worksheets and grants management. The FEMA Liaison Officer at FEMA Coo rdinating Office is responsible for the implementation of the public assistance process and ove r sees all administra tive procedures. All contract and work in progress monitoring of public assistance recovery pr ojects is the responsibility of the Capital Im provement Construction Coordination Office with the exception of major flood recovery and mitigation projects, which are the responsibility of the Division of Recovery and Mit igation of the Regulatory and Economic Resources Department ( R ER). If add i tional support staff is required for the preparation of correspondence and mai n taining of files the County will utilize county employee s through its Disaster Assistance Employee (DAE) pr o gram. The State of Florida and/or FEMA then issu e s a determination as to w hether an applicant is, in fact, el i gible to receive public assistance funding. A Kickoff Meeting then scheduled and conducted by the Public Assi s tance Coordination ( PAC ) Crew Leader The meeting is designed to provide a much more d e tailed review of the PA Program and the applicant's needs. The meeting is the first step in establishing a partnership among FEMA, the State, and the applicant and is designed to focus on the specific needs of that applicant. The meeting f ocuses on the eligibility and documen tation requirements that are most pertinent to an appl i cant. The FEMA Kick Off meeting will be held at a determined location and will be attended by a repr e sentative from the State, FEMA, M DEM and the applicant. Potential applicants are responsible for i dentif y ing possible infrastructure recovery projects and participating in the public assistance process Each appl i cant deemed eligible prepare s a Project Worksheet or PW (FEMA form 90 91) for each da m aged facility. The PW consist s of a scope of work

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 75 of 237 nece ssary to return the facility to its pre disaster condition and, an e s timate of the cost to do so (see 44 CFR 206). Each P roject W orksheet submitted is then validated by a repr e sentative from FEMA and/or from the S tate. Types of State or Federal Assistanc e Individual Assistance (IA) is assistance to private citizens who sustained damage from the disaster event and are uninsured or have insufficient insurance to cover their losses. This program is admini s tered by the Small Business Administration (SBA) or through the FEMA Individuals and Households Program (IHP). Additionally, there is assistance available for those individuals who have be en u n employed because of the disaster. Businesses that have been impacted by the disa s ter may be eligible for recovery loans from the SBA. An SBA declaration helps any eligible bus i ness regardless of the size of that business. Public Assistance (PA) is disaster assistance provided to public entities including state, county and munic i pal governments, Indian tribes and cert ain PNPs that provide an essential governmental type service. Recovery Activities of the EOC Human Services and EOC Infrastructure Branches Human Services The Human Services Branch maintains certain duties during the recovery phase. T hree areas play an int e gral role: 1. Disaster Assistance Ce n ters (DACs) 2. Mass Care 3. Unmet Needs Disaster Assistance Centers (DACs) Miami Dade Emergency Management (MDEM) has established sites that are strategically located throughout the County and will serve as Disaster Assistance Centers (DACs). disaster affected areas and designed to provide information and referrals regarding the types of disaster se rvices available. Depending on the magnitude of the disaster, they may also include th e provision of other di saster related services or resources such as the distribution of food and water, comfort items, emergency med ical and mental health services, family reun ification. Resources and agencies assigned to a DAC will vary d epending on the severity and magnitude of the disa s ter. If a presidential declaration is issued, DACs will deactivate once State and Federal pe r sonnel arrive and open Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). If a presidential declaration is not issued, a DAC will remain open unt il the immediate needs of the community have been met or VOAD agencies can handle the d e creasing workload at their respective facilities. Community Action and Human Services (CAHS) is the lead agency responsible for the opening and closing of DACs. If th e need to open a DAC is determined M DEM will not i fy CAHS who will oversee and coordinate DAC operations. DAC locations will be located, when poss i ble, within existing County owned or leased locations If additional loca tions are needed, Park Recreations and Open Spaces Depar tment, C AHS centers may also b e utilized A list of previously identified DAC loc a tions is maintained in the DAC SOP at M DEM

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 76 of 237 If the disaster is of a catastrophic nature, causes widespread damage throughout several segments of the Co unty, and the need for the establishment of a DRC is determined the request for assistance from State and Federal partners will be routed through the EOC Logistic Section and placed in EM Constellation. Whenever possible, DAC locations will be converted t o DRCs upon the arrival of FEMA and FL DEM pe r sonnel and may be au g mented by other local C ounty agencies or social service providers. In the event that pre identified DACs are not suitable DRC locations, additional sites such as parks or community ce n ters w ill be identified. The process of awarding individual assistance is overseen at the DACs and DRCs. CAHS collect s all cu r rent contact information of agencies offering recovery services and provide it to 311 for public dissemin a tion. The DAC coordinator act s as liaison with the EOC Human Services Branch Director at the EOC on all matters r elated to the operation of DACs/DRCs. These responsibilities include, obtaining proc e dures on how DAC / DRC personnel will be contacted for work assignments and locations an d an inventory of items to include, data, equipment and vehicles required to operate the DAC/DRC. There should also be coordin a tion with the FEMA DFO. Local agencies that may pr o vide information and referral in the DAC/DRC may include but are not limited to the following age n cies: American Red Cross Community Action and Human Services Department of Children & Families Department of Labor Internal Services Department Internal Revenue Service Public Housing and Community Development RACES State Department of Financial Services Salvation Army Miami Dade VOAD For standard operating procedures for DAC oper a tions, please refer to ESF 6 (Mass Care). Mass Care The American Red Cross maintains a list of approved shelter sites that meet the criterion outlined in ARC 4496, which states the methods to be used in selecting sites for congregate care facilities. Co m pliance to this standard is confirmed by the use of ARC Mass Care Facility Survey Form. Additionally, MDEM utilizes the accessibility criteria outlined in the U.S. Department of Justice, Americans with Disabilities Act, ADA Checklist for Eme r gency Shelters to ensure that all evacuation centers are ADA compliant. In the case of sheltering for individuals with access and functional needs please refer to the Medical Evacu ation Center (MEC ) SOP, maintained and revised by the Miami Dade Emergency Manag e ment

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 77 of 237 In the event that repatriation of a portion of the population is not possible, post incident, actions within the Post Disaster Housing Plan (PDHP) will be initiated. The County will utilize all available/vacant residential space within Miami Dade County (i.e. condominiums, single family home, mobile homes, etc. prior to the impleme nt a tion of Housing Camps or requesting Federal assistance for manufactured h omes. Unmet Needs The response activities immediately following a disaster will focus on meeting the urgent needs of post disaster victims such as emergency shelter, food, water, and medical care. Initial reco v ery efforts from the local government o r relief organizations may commence as response activities are still ta k ing place. Recovery assistance may include temporary housing, loans, and grants for individuals from relief organizations or from the traditional government assistance programs of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other state programs such as low interest loans are also available through the Small Business Administration (SBA). The Unmet Needs Committee is a cooper a tive effort between County and municipal governments an d non governmental organizations. The purpose of th e Unmet Needs C ommittee is to provide information on the coordination of an inclusive community based plan to identify and resolve emergency and long term disaster related needs that cannot be met by trad itional resources. Such unmet needs may include sheltering, feeding, bulk distribution of supplies, and temporary housing following an emergency or disaster. Throughout the short and long term recovery phase of an incident, or when the EOC Incident Command er so directs, all unmet needs will be forwarded to the EOC Human Services Branch Director. The EOC Human Services Branch D irector will convene the Unmet Needs Committee to determine through its committee membership of commun ity service providers, local c hurches, community outreach programs, County and municipal departments how to fulfill all requests for u n met needs. Training for the Unmet Needs Committee and local community groups are throughout the year and are int egrated into the MDEM three year tra ining plan Training s include National Incident Management System, emergency home repair, debris removal, donation warehouse management, assistance centers, shelter ma nagement, volunteer management, community personal preparedness, crisis counseling, and other needed assi s tance. EOC Infrastru c ture Branch lights, medical services, electrical and telephone services, food supplies, garbage and debris pi ck up and di sposal. The short term recovery phase begins with the restoration of these services. Full documentation of recovery efforts must be maintained especially in the event of an emergency or disaster declaration when FEMA will r e quire such docume ntation to be attached to the Project Worksheets. Debris Removal The process of debris removal and clearance of critical transportation infrastructure is a cooperative effort b etween Miami Dade Solid Waste Management, Miami Dade Parks R ecreation and Open Spaces D e partment, Miami Dade Public Works and Waste Management Department and the Florida Department of Transportation. The County has been divided into debris removal areas and contracts are in place for the emergency r e moval and disposal of debris in each of these areas. Staging, sorting, and disposal sites have been identified

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 78 of 237 throughout the County, and can be found in the Miami Dade Solid Waste Disposal SOP The Miami Dade County Finance D epartment is responsible for the collection and maintenance of debris financial records with the exception of load tickets these are maintained by Public Works and Waste Ma n agement, who is the lead for debris removal. The details of this process may be found in the Coordina t ed Debris Clearance Plan. In the event of a major disaster, FEMA may make debris clearance a mission assignment to another age n cy such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ESF 10 (Hazardous Materials) is responsible for the coordination of all hazardous materials issues encou ntered during the debris removal process. This may include issues dealing with paint, batteries, i n secticides, and other household goods found in damaged structures. The details of this process may be found in ESF 10 located in the ESF section of this document. Insurance Coordination The Miami Dade Office of Risk Management maintains the procedures and policies for insurance coordin a tion and implementation. The Miami Dade Office of Risk Management is activated by notification of the D i rector of M DEM or his/her designee i n response to the issuance of the disaster declar a tion. Administration and Finance Procedures The procedures for handling the tasks assigned to the EOC Administration and Finance Section Chief are ou tlined in this section. Staffing The emergency support st aff utilized for preparing correspondence and mai n taining files during the short term recovery phase of an incident or disaster is assigned from a pool of maint e nance and clerical staff secured from the Internal Services Department The complete procedure s for the acquisition of emerge n cy support staff may be found in the Miami Dade Proc e dures Manual maintained at M DEM In the event that additional staff is required, temporary employment procurement contracts are mai n tained by the Miami Dade Fire Rescue P ersonnel Department for the purpose of prov iding suitable temporary staff. Hazard Mitigation Hazard mitigation under sections 404 and 406 of the Stafford Act is any action taken to reduce or elim i nate the long term risk to human life and property from nat ural or man made hazards. While the County is pe r forming repair or restorative work, it should consider mitigation methods that will pr e vent similar damage in a future event thereby reducing future da m age costs. Hazard Mitigation is pursued on a project by project basis A positive benefit/cost ratio must exist to e n sure that the additional work will be cost effective. Mitigation is accomplished by completing additional work that is beyond the scope of normal repairs and beyond code requirements in orde r to reduce the vulnerability to f uture disaster related da m ages. Mitigation planning is provided through the Miami Dade Local Mitigation Strategy (LMS) and ca r ried out by the LMS Working Group that consists of representatives from all phases of the commu nity including county d epartments, municipalities, public and private schools and universities, non profit organizations and me m bers of

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 79 of 237 the private sector. Day to day supervision of the LMS is accomplished through a steering committee appoin ted by the Wor king Group and is staffed by Miami Dade EM perso n nel. The LMS contains a full hazard mitigation plan covering virtually any hazard that might occur in South Flo r ida. It also includes numerous recommended mitigation projects and a summary of possible fund ing sources. Please refer to the Local Mitigation Strategy (LMS) for more detailed mitigation i n formation. RESPONSIBILITIES PART 1 LOCAL GOVERNMENT, AGENCIES AND PARTNERS The following entities w ithin Miami Dade County have functional responsibilities an d may be required to have re p resentation within the EOC. Office of the Mayor/County Executive Office Serves as the EOC Incident Commander or appoint Designee during emergency events. Leads Executive Policy Advisors Team Serve as official representative o f Miami Dade County and speak on behal f of its actions in r e sponse to disasters or emergencies. Appoint a Director of Emergency Management. Mobilize any or all functional parts of Miami Dade County government, take special actions and put in place all appr opriate regulations that will protect the lives and property of the citizens of Miami Dade County Direct and reallocate county assets and resources during an emergency and other duties and respons ibilities in accordance with Municipal Code 8 B. Legislat iv e Offices Board of County Commissioners (BCC) Section 8B 4 (1) Conduct Board business in event of a disaster or emergency: If, due to a disaster or emergency as defined herein, it becomes impossible to conduct the affairs of Miami Dade County gover n men t at reg u lar or usual places, the Board, as the legislative body of Miami Dade County, may meet upon the call of the Chairperson at any place within the territorial limits of Miami Dade County. If reloc a tion is required due to the effects of a disaster or emergency, the affairs of the Board shall be lawfully conducted at temporary loc ation(s) until normal facilities can be restored. This section does not in any way dismiss the Board's responsibil ities under the Florida State Open Government Sunshine Act, as amended. All reasonable a t tempts must be made to comply with the requirements of Florida Statutes 286.011. (2) Termination of a Local State of Emergency: If a Local State of Emergency has been declared by the Mayor or the Chairperson of the Board of Cou nty Commissioners in the absence of the Mayor and e x ceeds thirty (30) days, the Board can terminate the Declaration of a Local State of Eme r gency by a two thirds (2/3) majority vote of those present. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 3, 5 25 99) Section 8B 5 Procedure for adoption of ordinances and regulations during disasters or eme r gencies:

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 80 of 237 Upon affirmation by the Mayor or the Chairperson of the Board of County Commissioners in the a b sence of the Mayor that a disaster or emergency exists which will affect the healt h, safety or welfare of the citizens of Miami Dade County, any such ordinance or regulation adopted and promulgated b e cause of such disaster or emergency shall become enforceable immediately upon promulg a tion. A copy shall be filed with the Clerk of the C ircuit Court as Clerk of the Miami Dade County Commission within twenty four (24) hours of its promulg ation. Upon failure to file the ordinance or regulation within twenty four (24) hours, such ordinance or reg u lation shall not be deemed to have been adop ted because of a disaster or emergency and shall have no effect until filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court as Clerk of the Miami Dade County Commission within a p eriod of fifteen (15) days as heretofore pr o vided. (Ord. No. 99 51, § 2, 3, 5 25 99). County Attorney Provide staff for the Executive Policy Advisors Team at the EOC. Advise county officials concerning legal responsibilities, powers and liabilities regarding emergency o perations and post disaster and recovery assistance. Assist t he Board of County Commissioners and County Executive Office with maintaining continu i ty of government. Assist in obtaining legal clearance needed to dispose of debris and materials resulting from an eme rgency event. Prepare emergency ordinances and local declarations. Assist with the preparation of applications, legal interpretations, or opinions regarding recovery and/or reimbursement. Miami Dade County Agencies The following agencies are each assigned functional responsibilities and may be required to have repr e sent ation within the EOC. Detailed lists of ESF responsibilities are available in Volume II of the CEMP. Miami Dade Emergency Management ( M DEM) Serves as lead agency for ESF 5 Planning ) Serves as lead agency for ESF 11 ( Food & Water ) Serves as lead agency for ESF 12 ( Energy ) Serves as lead agency for ESF 18 ( Business & Recovery ) ( Long term Recovery, Mitigation & Econo m ic Stabilization) Serves as EOC Incident Commander in the absence of the County Ma yor Maintain a comprehensive countywide program of emergency management. Provide staff for the EOC Management Command Team at the EOC. Provide staff, resources and facilities to support emergency operations and manage recovery oper ations. Provide support to all other Emergency Support Functions (ESF) as outlined in this plan. Coordinate recovery and mitigation activities as outlined in this plan. Coordinate damage assessment and debris removal activities during an emergency.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 81 of 237 Develop and maintain the county Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP) Manage a Duty Officer Program to monitor incidents or potential incidents that may affect M i ami Dade County and provide emergency alert and notifications. Manage the EOC and ensure operational readiness 24/7. Manage county logistical staging areas and points of distribution sites Manage the county Disaster Assistance Employee (DAE) program. Animal Services (ASD) Serve as lead agency for ESF 17 Animal Protection ) Staff ESF 17 chair at Human Services Con tact suppliers of goods and services to ensure that appropriate arrangements have been made to provide essential resources during and after an incident or di s aster Compile or update a resource list from repr e sentative agencies. Perform a preliminary needs a s sessment of their facilities. Maintain and upkeep the county Pet Registry. Anticipate animal needs based upon pr o jected severity of the incident or disaster. Coordinate evacuation activities of staff and animals to a designated safe location during a sev ere weather event. Prioritize resource request to ensure that each resource request meets the criteria for a c tion by ESF 17 ( Animal Protection ) Ensure that the appropriate animal she l ters and facilities are operational. Notify checkpoints and animal facil ities of the anticipated arrival time of the r e source. Coordinate with ESF 16 ( Law Enforcement ) to provide traffic control for routing of resources when r equired. Coordinate with ESF 3 ( Public Works and Engineering ) to confirm that the anticipated routes a re pass able. Coordinate the response to address the health, shelter, and wellbeing of lost, sick, abandoned, and i njured animals after a disaster. Provide veterinarians, support staff and pet supplies for Pet Friendly Evacuation Centers. Coordinate bulk food and supplies storage and distribution during an emergency. Maintain roster of volunteers for Pet Friendly Evacuation Centers. Manage staff and volunteers at Pet Friendly Evacuation Centers. Contact all recipients of loaned equipment and supplies and v erify that arrangements have been made to return those items. Close animal shelters and facilities as r e quired. Deactivate the volunteer staff as r e quired. Aviation As part of Trans portation Group, Aviation liaisons with air carriers and Federal Aviation Administr a tion (no fly zones). Provides information on operability of County Airports.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 82 of 237 Conducts damage assessments of County Airports. Advise availability of aviation fuels. Man age all hazard incidents at County Airports. Community Action and Human Services ( CA HS ) Serve as support agency for ESF 6 ( Mass Care ) Serve as lead agency for an Unmet Needs Committee. Assess the human impact of potential or actual disasters on social s ystems in general with atte n tion to the elderly, veterans, welfare recipients, physically challenged refugee or immigrant populations, and other vulnerable populations. Devise a screening mechanism to identify unmet needs. Provide assistance to the EOC Ev acuation Support Center (ESC) to meet the disaster related needs of e l derly residents via the Senior Advocate. Manage and staff Disaster Assistance Centers (DAC) locations post event. Maintain a resource directory of county departments and social services agencies that may assist at a DAC. Coordinate the Residential Shuttering Program and assist clients with installation of the shutters when the County is threatened by a hurricane. Train and manage Disaster Assistance Employees (DAE) that install shutteri ng panels during times of emergency. Assist Unmet Needs Committee in the planning, management and coordination of repairs and retr o fitting of damaged households. Corrections and Rehabilitation (MDCR) Operations Section. Maintain operations of correctional facilities and coordinate evacuation of inmates if ne c essary. Provide staff to assist with calls to residents in the Emergency Evac u ation Assistance Program (EEAP) when an evacuation order is issued. Provide logistical support including equipment & personnel transport upon request for all incidents i ncluding a Turkey Point Nuclear Plant or a mass migration event. Regulatory and Economic Resources Department ( R ER ) Serve as co lead agency for ESF 10 ( Hazardous Materials ) Develop supporting plans and procedures. Conduct training and exercises. Develop and maintain hazardous response teams to respond to incidents throughout county. Develop and maintain notification rosters. Participate in planning with support agencies. Maintains inventory of available and obtainable resources to include: vehicles, equipment, mat e rials, personnel and facilities for use during a disaster. Prioritize current incidents, review with EOC Public Safety Branch Director and coo rdinate recovery r esources with support agencies (such as MDFR, Municipal Branch Represent a tives, Miami Dade Police Department, US Coast Guard) for ESF 10 ( Hazardous Materials ) oper a tions.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 83 of 237 Collect data of current ESF 10 ( Hazardous Materials ) operations/res ource status, note the ou t comes of the Incident Action Plan (IAP) and advise Command Post. Coordinate to contain, isolate and clean up spills of contaminate waste. Survey impacted areas for releases of contaminate materials. Inspect facilities that use, ma nufacture, and/or transport contaminate materials for releases or da m age. Coordinate with State partners on permitting for the disposal of debris. Coordinate with the Public Works and Solid Waste Department to ensure compliance with the disposal of househo ld contaminates. Assists with debris removal from waterways. Ensures compliance with air and water quality standards and other provisions of the Miami Dade County Code. Coordinate the cleaning of contaminated sites which threaten our groundwater supply. A ddress environmental issues within damage assessment and debris management. Ensure floodplain code compliance during recovery. Develop de mobilization plan with lead ESF 10 Response agency and support agencies. Participate in ESF 18 ( Business & Recovery ) ( Long term Recovery, Mitigation & Economic Stabiliz ation) Serve as support agency for ESF 17 ( Animal Protection ) Combat price gouging should a state of emergency be declared in support of ESF 18 ( Business & R ecovery ) ( Long term Recovery, Mitigation & E c o nomic Stabilization) Inform and educate the general public on consumer safety during an emergency. Maintain a website with consumer information for the general public. Certifies firms as small or disadvantaged owned businesses. Reviews proposed County p urchases and contracts to determine if small or minority participation measures are to be applied. Reviews affirmative action plans and monitors contracts which include small or minority business parti cipation to help ensure compl i ance with program regulat ions and guidelines. Reviews construction contracts to determine if workforce goals are to be applied. Provides structural damage assessment information to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. Designate dangerous and unsafe structures. Evaluate designa ted structures for habitability. Issue emergency building permits as needed. Coordinate municipal damages through municipal building officials. Conduct damage assessment in agricultural areas. Acts as liaison for agricultural community. Acts as liaison bet ween the USDA, Farm Services Agency, and Natural Resources Conservation Age ncy. Acts as liaison with Miami Dade Office of Agricultural Management. Handles emergency veterinarian services for farm animals. Serve as support to ESF 3 ( Public Works & Engineeri ng ) Prepare zoning recommendations and administer zoning regulations. Coordinate all concurrency management related activities.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 84 of 237 Administer impact fee program. Issue certificates of use and occupancy. Develop and maintain the Comprehensive Development Mast er Plan (CDMP). Address concerns of the agricultural community via the Office of the Agricultural Manager. Information Technology Department ( ITD ) Serve as lead agency for ESF 2 ( Communications ) Ensure interoperability of public county telecommunication s. Provide security for county information management systems. Develop and maintain inventory of assets including auxiliary radio equipment and caches. Develop and maintain notification rosters and sign in/out logs. Provide for protection of vital electron ic records. Maintain backup emergency communications. Contact local and state designated ESF 2 ( Communications ) personnel. Arrange for 24 hour continuity of operation and set up the duty roster, as conditions r e quire. Confirm municipal branch EOC activat ions and test communication systems. Note any communication system that does not meet operational status and report to the Infrastru c ture Branch Director. Annually communicate with federal partners on the TPS, WPS and GETS communication prov i sions. Provide technical assistance in data retrieval and restoration. Provide communication services for emergency response operations. Provide technical assistance to the Emergency Operations Center ( EOC ) Assess the communications infrastructure. Maintain critical se rvices and systems. Allocate emergency portable co m munications equipment. Supply cache of auxiliary radios to elected officials. Coordinate mutual aid requests for communications resources with logistics branch. Receive, evaluate, and support resource r e qu ests for ESF 2. Arrange for 24 hour continuity of oper a tion and review periodically. Review preliminary vulnerability and create an evaluation based upon predicted incident conditions and transmit situation report to the Infrastru c ture Branch Director. C ollect information relative to ESF 2 and prepare situation reports on a frequency to be d e termined by the EOC Operations Section Chief. Provide communication services for recovery operations. Restore (if necessary) auxiliary radio caches. Conduct after act ion review. Receive, prioritize, and evaluate recovery r e source requests. Plan and execute the repair, replacement or relocation of county communication system equipment to meet the communication needs of the disa s ter workers. Continue the maintenance of 2 4 hour continuity of operation. Insure that ad e quate shift overlap time is provided for the orderly tran s fer of shift operations. Coordinate the restoration of vital records for County facilities, as appropriate.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 85 of 237 Plan for and execute the repair, replacemen t and restoration of computer equipment. Finance Serve as support for Admin/Finance Section at the EOC during an emergency. Assist with applications for federal reimbursement and cost recovery. Staff DAE call center during activation. Fire Rescue (MDFR) Serve as lead agency for ESF 4 ( Firefighting ) ESF 9 ( Urban Search and Rescue ) and co lead for ESF 10 ( Ha z ardous Materials ) Prioritize current incidents, review with EOC Public Safety Branch Director and coordinate with support agencies for ESF 4 (Munici pal Branch Representatives, Miami Dade Water & Sewer), ESF 9 (Municipal Branch Representatives, Miami Dade Building Department), ESF 10 Response (Municipal Branch Re presentatives, Miami Dade Police Department, Miami Dade County Health Department, Miami Dad e D epartment of Environmental Resource Management) during an emergency Collect data of current ESF operations/resource status, note the outcomes of the Incident Action Plan and advise Command Posts (Fire, USAR, HAZMAT). Provide EMS staff for support of ES F 8 ( Health & Medical ) within the Evacuation Support Center to a ssist with the Emergency Evacuation Assistance Program (EEAP) clients via amb u lance. Provide EMS staff for support of ESF 8 ( Health & Medical ) with provision of a Basic Life Support (BLS) Ambu lance Team to each hurricane evacuation center to assist with health and safety i s sues. Store and deliver evacuation centers supplies. Provide support staff for EOC Planning Section Support damage assessment activities. Internal Services Department (ISD ) Serve as lead agency for ESF 7 Resource Support Develop supporting plans and procedures. Participate in training and exercises. Develop and maintain inventory of county assets. Develop and maintain notification rosters. Identify and train staff as EOC re presentatives. Participate in planning with support agencies. Ensure that county fuel supplies are at maximum and remind county departments to top of fuel su p plies prior to the response period. Evaluate resource requests to ensure that all information is accurate and complete. Determine the most appropriate method for obtaining the required items. Refer the resource request to a procurement specialist as appropriate (all other means of obtaining the resource have been exhausted). Determine available or exi sting resources such as the assets, equipment, supplies, facilities, and veh icles that belong to any given agency. Secure items through existing county inventories.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 86 of 237 Obtain the necessary resources through contractors, vendors, other agencies, governments an d/or pu blic or private groups. In conjunction with Procurement Management Services solicit vendor information and quotes for su pporting agencies. Coordinate with the other ESFs within the Logistics Section to identify, acquire and arrange transport ation, if needed, of requested resources. Assist in the determination of the most appropriate location for the County Staging Area (CSA) and/or Logistical Staging Areas (LSAs), donations warehouses, and distribution sites, as nece s sary. Continue fulfilling resou rce requests to support recovery activities and EOC agencies. Acquire the necessary equipment for established the County Staging Area (CSA) and/or points of distr ibut ion. Assist in establishing and operating a donations warehouse, if one is needed. Identify facilities necessary for recovery activities as needed. Support in the provision of transportation of supplies as necessary. Continue follow up and close out of req uests made to the State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC). Ensure adequate fuel supplies are maintained for county departments and/or operations. Update and close out outstanding resource requests in the Miami e ment system. Implem ent emergency purchasing procedure during an EOC activation. Manage the e PAR for county employees assigned to work during an emergency. Manage the four (4) Regional staging areas for DAEs. Community Information and Outreach ( CIAO ) Serve as support agency for ESF 5 ( Planning ) during EOC activation. Staff Emergency Operations Center PIO workroom during activations. Assist in the development of appropriate messages for press and media releas es. Support the dissemination of accurate and timely information to the general public. Manage and staff the County 311 Call Center. Coordinate Miami Dade TV coverage of EOC press conferences and provide translation of these brie fings in Spanish and Creole. C onducts quarterly call downs to staff to prepare the employees for an actual event the Reverse 311 system is used for this task. Conduct bi annual hurricane preparedness classes for the staff. Provid e family tips for 311 employees tip sheet. Conduct bi annual mock activations staff reports to their designated site to ensure the process in sync with the event. Annual review of carpooling teams are reviewed and updated. Provide American Sign Languag e translators, as needed.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 87 of 237 Homeless Trust (HT) Coordinate emergency procedures and sheltering operations for homeless population with hom e less support agencies. Conduct bi annual census of the county homeless population. Public Housing and Community Devel opment Department (PHA) Serve as support agency for ESF 6 ( Mass Care ) Assist Unmet Needs Committee in the planning, management and coordination of housing vou cher a pplications, determining qualifications, and issuance of vouchers. Support damage assessment activities for county facilities Miami Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) Debris clearance on roads within their jurisdiction. Damage assessment on roads with in their jurisdiction. Medical Examiner Department (ME) Serve as the lead agency tasked with the identification and disposition of human remains in a mass f atality incident. Coordinate the identification and disposition of the deceased, which may include requesting Disa s ter Mortuary Assistance Teams (DMORTs) in the event of mass casualties. Office of Communications Serve as lead agency for ESF 14 ( Public Information ) Serve as chief spokesperson for the County. Review and re write standardized a nd pre scripted press releases following activation and exerci s es. Conduct EOC press conferences. Manage the Press Room during an incident. Support the management of the EOC PIO workroom. Office of A mericans with D isability A ct (ADA) Coordination Provide guidance on assistance and support agencies available for people with disabilities. Office of Economic Development and International Trade (O E D IT ) Assist in the planning, management and coordination of housing repairs and business development grants durin g the recovery phase.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 88 of 237 Management and Budget Department (OM B ) Serve as support agency to Human Resources group within Logistic Section during activ a tion. Coordinate Incorporation and Annexation efforts. Manage and administer the federal Ryan White HIV/AIDS treatment Modernization Act of 2006. Park s Recreation and Open Spaces Department (MDPR) Participates in major road clearance efforts following a disaster. Assess and reports damage to park facilities including marinas. Provides additional support resources as needed (park space and buildings). Provides sufficient warning for Turkey Point incident. Ensure Turkey Point warning signage is maintained throughout the 10 mile EPZ. Maintain marine staging area at Matheson Hammock for Turkey Point incident. Provides backup veterinarian support to Animal Services and Cooperative Extension. Police Department (MDPD) Serve as lead agency for ESF 16 ( Law Enforcement ) (2 representatives assigned). Prioritize current incidents, review with Public Safety Branch Director and coordinate with support age ncies for ESF 16 (Municipal Branch Representatives, Miami Dade County Corrections & Rehabilitation, Miami Dade County Public Schools Police, Florida Dep artment of Law Enforcement/Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Fish & Wildlife, N a tional Park Service, United States Coast Guard). Collect data of current ESF operations/resource status, note the outcomes of the Incident Action Plan and advise MDPD Command Pos t and MDPD Districts. Assign personnel to evacuation assignments to include traffic control, PSN evacuation escort, evacua ted area security (as feasible), route alerting. Assist in damage assessment missions (e.g., mobile homes, traffic control infrastruct ure). Coordinate & provide staffing of police officers at secondary and tertiary evacuation shelters (when opened). Develop de mobilization plan. Participate in debris management and addresses issues arising due to illegal dumping Port Miami (Seaport) As part of the Transportation Group, liaisons with marine shipping interests. Provides information on operability of County ports. Conducts damage assessments of port facilities. Advise availability of marine fuels. Property Appraiser (PA) Serve as support agency for ESF 3 ( Public Works & Engineering ) Determine value of property within the County for tax purposes. Support damage assessment activities during the aftermath of a disaster. Public Works and Waste Management (P W WD)

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 89 of 237 Serve as lead agency for ESF 3 ( Public Works & Engineering ) Develop supporting plans and procedures. Conduct training and exercises. Develop and maintain inventory of assets. Develop and maintain notification rosters. Develop plans and procedures for damage assessment. Participate in the Coordinated Debris Clearance Plan. Participate in planning with support agencies. Provide equipment, trucks, operators, and supplies for debris clearance. Activate the deployment of Initial Damage Assessment (IDA) teams. Receive, distribute, and evalua te support and response resource r e quests. List items for inclusion in the situation reports. Review team rosters to ensure cont i nuity of operation. Provide initial damage assessment for Miami Dade County. Lead agency for debris clearance from roads, bridg es, and secondary canal sy s tem. Participate in drawbridge lockdown operations. Provide primary damage assessment, for roads, bridges, secondary canals systems, and traffic co n trol signs and signals. Provide damage assessment, reports, and certifications as r e quired. Conduct after action review. Receive, distribute, and evaluate resource requests for the area affected by the incident or disa s ter. List items for inclusion in the briefings and situation reports. Activate the deployment of mutual aid teams, an d other emergency work teams in the disaster area as r e quired. Insure adequate shift overlap to allow for transmission of inform a tion. Coordinate with FEMA and State authorities on data required for reimbursement of expenditures. S erve as lead agency for d ebris management and removal. Operate a variety of facilities to include Resource Recovery (water to energy facilities), landfills, transfer stations and Trash & Recycling Centers. Continue day to day operations during an emergency. Transit (MDT) Serve as lead agency for ESF 1 ( Transportation ) Develop and maintain notification rosters. Conduct planning with designated support agencies. Coordinate bus and driver requirements for evacuation of at risk populations. Participate in Transportation Group to sup port for evacuation planning. Conduct a transportation vulnerability assessment on possible impacts of hazardous co n ditions. c ture. Manage transportation ser vices to support emergency operations. Preposition equipment and resources based upon projected requirements. Provide support and technical assistance to evacuations.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 90 of 237 Coordinate mutual aid requests for transportation services and assets. Coordinate the pr ovision of transportation for residents with medical needs during evacu a tions. Cease transportation service as appropriate during an impending storm or other identified hazard and alert the general public in a timely fashion. Receive, evaluate, coordinate, and implement support and resource requests for ESF 1 ( Transport ation ) Provide sufficient shift overlap to facilitate an orderly transfer of information from one shift to the next. Maintain duty roster and attendance log as r e quired. Coordinate availabl e manpower and equipment resources to insure continuous 24 hour operation of transportation vehicles when and if required. Prepare situation reports for dissemination to the I n frastructure Branch Director. Coordinate the flow information to and from tri r ail and Amtrak during an EOC activation. Provide buses as emergency shelter, as requested, during an incident. Evaluate the transportation needs relative to continued sheltering, re entry into previously ev a cuated areas and special need persons evacuated Restore county transportation services. Coordinate the transportation requirements in support of the establishment of Disaster Assistance Ce nters (DACs). Water and Sewer Department (WASD) Provide damage assessment information for Water and Sewer Facili ties. Report on Water system operability (potable). Report on Sewer system operability (lift stations). Provide heavy equipment as requested Partner Agencies and Others The following state and federal agencies will have functional responsibilities and re presentation within the EOC: Agency for Healthcare Administration (AHCA) Provide staff fo r Health and Medical Group Unit. Maintain communication with health care facilities before, during, and after a disaster. Assist health care facilities with any probl ems they may encounter in preparation for an evac uation or after an evacuation. Monitor health care facility bed counts and typing information through the online Emergency Status Sy stem (ESS) or via manual call downs with facility points of contact. Assist medical facilities that have experienced substantial damage with the relocation of res idents/patients to other medical facilities. Monitor the operational status of all medical services before during and after the disaster. Bureau of Radiation Control (BRC) Serve as technical expert within the EOC Planning Section during a radiological emergency incident.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 91 of 237 Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Coordinate with ESF 16 ( Law Enforceme nt ) on operations during an emergency. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Lead and support the Nation in a risk based, comprehensive emergency management system of pr eparedness, protection, response, recovery, and mitigation by working in partners hip with other organiz ations that are part of the nation's emergency management system. Provide staff at the EOC (when appropriate) during an impending emergency. Support damage assessment activities. Provide technical guidance and support to county depart ments, business, other agencies and organiz ations and individuals on eligibility for applicable federal programs. Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF) Serve as support agency for ESF 6 ( Mass Care ) Coordinate the distribution of bulk (USDA Co mmodities) food and / or food stamps for federally d e clared disasters. Serve as liaison with licensed day care centers as outlined in the Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant pr ocedures. Coordinate the provision of mental health services in federally declared disasters. Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Protect, conserve and manage Florida's natural resources. Enforce the State's environmental laws. Implement state and federal laws relating to recycling, pollution prevention and solid and hazardous waste management. Regulate and register aboveground and underground pollutant storage systems. Cleanup sites contaminated with petroleum products, dry cleaning solvents or other hazardous wastes. Implement Florida's Solid Waste Program. Provide S tate guidance on debris management. Florida Depa rtment of Transportation (FDOT) Participate in debris management on State roads. Damage assessment for State roads. Participate in drawbridge lockdown operations for State owned bridges. Coordinate toll waiv er during evacuations. Operate highway alert system. Florida D ivision of Emergency Management (FDEM)

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 92 of 237 Coordinate efforts of the Federal Government with other departments and agencies of state gover nment, with county and municipal governments and school bo ards, and with private agencies that have a role in emergency management. Maintain a comprehensive statewide program of emergency management. Provide staff at the EOC (when appropriate). Mobilize and deploy SERT in response to emergencies throughout the St ate. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Coordinate with ESF 16 ( Law Enforcement ) to develop county wide priority list. Address incidents based upon list. Develop county wide de mobilization plan with lead ESF 16 agency. Assist with rescue of exotic animals. Coordinate removal sunken vessels Coordinate debris removal from bay bottom. Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) / Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) Staff p port to ESF 16 ( Law Enforcement ) Collect data on current operational and resource status of own age n cy. Develop priority list of incidents within own jurisdiction. Co ordinate with ESF 16 ( Law Enforcement ) to develop county wide priority list. Address incidents based upon list. Provide support to ESF 16 in evacuation operations. Develop county wide de mobilization plan with lead ESF 16 agency. Florida National Guard (F NG) Serve as lead for ESF 13 ( Military Support ) Support EOC Logistics section missions (e.g., POD operations). Provide support to ESF 16. Address incidents based upon list. Develop county wide de mobilization plan with lead ESF 16 agency. Homestead Air Reserve Base (HARB) Support air operations for southern part of County. Provide staff at EOC (when appropriate).

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 93 of 237 Miami Dade County Health Department (MDCHD) Health & Medical: Serve a s l ead agency for ESF 8 ( Health & Medical ). Liaison with ESF 8 at the State and Federal level. p port staff for Health and Medical Group Unit and Evacuation Support Center (ESC). Provide 24 hour staff coverage to the EOC as conditions and activation levels warrant. Provide timely status reports to the EOC Human Services Branch Director regarding ESF 8 response a ctivities and essential elements of information (i.e. ho spital bed counts and points of contact, state of read iness and preparedness, etc.). Submit requests to EOC Human Services Branch Director to request assistance for mutual aid or from the State regarding the need for additional medical staff, equipment, me dicine, and other items as needed to maintain suitable medical capabilities in the County. Provide health assessments teams to determine the health and medical needs of the community. Monitor and address public health issues and concerns. Issue public heal th warnings and advisories in coordination with ESF 14 (Public Info r mation); disseminate health information to the public. Coordinate the setup, maintenance, and demobilization of Medical Evacuation Centers ( M ECs), to i n clude staffing (medical and administ rative), shelter inventory supply, and other onsite response fun c tions. Refer to the Medical Evacuation Center ( M EC) standard operating procedure for details. Provide nursing staff / personnel at Hurricane Evacuation Centers (HECs). Provide Medical Reserv e Corps (MRC) volunteers in order to augment evacuation center staffing and support other medical response needs. MRC volunteers will be supplemental and not considered core staff at evacuation centers. Coordinate state resources for medical facilities in cluding the request for State Disaster Medical Assi stance Teams (SMRT). Coordinate and assume the lead in conference calls including, but not limited to, hosp i tal calls, state wide ESF 8, and others as appropriate. Consortium which brings together hospital administr a tion and staff to discuss preparedness and mitigation measures. Assure that access and functional needs population t ransportation coordination is completed. Environmental Health: Lead agency for Environ mental Health. Provide a liaison to the EOC Human Services Branch in the capacity of Environmental Health Coordinator, and other representatives as appropriate. Provide 24 hour staff coverage to the EOC as conditions and activation levels warrant. Assist u tilities agencies in assessing the potability of public and private water supply systems. Evaluate the safety of food and drugs being provided for use by survivor victims at shelters. Conduct surveillance and monitoring activities, relating to environmenta l conditions, which could impact the health of the general public, according to established policies and procedures. Provide inspection staff for consultation, as needed, to ensure food and water safety at evacuation ce nters.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 94 of 237 National Hurricane Center (NH C) Track and predict the likely behavior of tropical depressions, tropical storms and hurricanes. Provide information to EOC for preparation and response to impending weather emergency. National Park Service (NPS) Staff chair at Public Safety Branch withi Collect data on current operational and resource status of own agency. Develop priority list of incidents within own jurisdiction. Coordinate with ESF 16 ( Law Enforcement ) to develop county wide priority list. Address incide nts based upon list. Develop county wide demobilization plan with ESF 16. Provide support to ESF 16 in evacuation operations. National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Fund debris removal from canals. Assist in erosion prevention in agriculture areas National Weather Service (NWS) Provide weather, climate forecasts and warnings. Operate the NOAA Weather Radio to transmit weather warnings and forecast. South Florida Wa ter Management District (SFWMD) Oversee pre storm drawdown in primary conveyance s ystems. Monitor water elevations throughout County. Remove debris from primary conveyance systems. Operate forward pumps and detention basin. Conduct damage assessment for primary conveyance systems including structures. United States Coast Guard (USCG) Collect data on current operational and resource status of own agency. Develop priority list of incidents within own jurisdiction. Coordinate with ESF 16 ( Law Enforcement ) to develo p county wide priority list. Address incidents based upon list. Develop county wide de mobilization plan with lead ESF 16 agency. Provide support to ESF 16 in evacuation operations (water based). Conduct damage assessment for navigable waterways. Issue mar ine safety information bulletins concerning port conditions for Port of Miami and Miami Ri v er. Assist in drawbridge lockdown operations. Order closure or opening of ports.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 95 of 237 United States Farm Service Agency (USDA) Provides disaster recovery funding to agr iculture interests. United States Small Business Administration (SBA) Provide staff to the Human Services Branch within the EOC Operations Section post disaster. Provide disaster loans and funding to impacted individuals and businesses. Private Not for P rofit (PNP) & Commercial Organizations The Miami Dade County CEMP tasks some commercial utility companies and private not for profit (PNP) o rganizations in the response to and recovery from emergencies/disasters. The following pr i vate not for profit and co mmercial agencies each have functional responsibilities and represent a tion within the EOC: American Red Cross of South Florida Region (ARC) Serve as lead agency for ESF 6 ( Mass Care ) Section. Coordinate the opening, management and staffing of hurricane evacuation centers and emergency she lters. Provide food, water and ice to disaster victims at shelters or via mobile feeling operations. Implement the Disaster Welfare Inquiry system to assist with family reunification. Coordinate with state and local governments and other private agencies to provide emergency mass care. Area Hospitals & Nursing Homes Provide shelter space for bed bound or 24 hour electrically dependent special needs re sidents. Christian Contractors Association Provide free emergency construction services Crisis Response Team Serve as support to ESF 8 ( Health and Medical ) during the recovery phase. Coordinate local mental health providers to facilitate critical incident response teams to assist surv i vors, victims, rescuers and others to cope with the trauma related to local disasters, regional or statewide emergencies. Compliment and supplement exis ting intervention and referral services to victims of critical inc i dents on a regional and statewide level. Assign mental health professionals at shelters, Disaster Assistance Centers (DAC), or other field sites as needed.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 96 of 237 Florida Regional Interfaith Inte ragency Emergency Network in Disasters, Inc. (F.R.I.E.N.D.S ) Assist Unmet Needs Committee in providing for unmet needs by contacting local or statewide inte r faith agencies who may be able to provide social services and assist in case management. Obtain f unds for Unmet Needs Committee that will process unmet needs referrals and assign a cas eworker that will identify the agency or organization able to meet the need. Florida First Staff ESF 18 ( Business & Recovery) during EOC activation. Provide information on status of financial institutions. Florida Health Care Association (FHCA) and Florida Hospital Association (FHA) Provide support to AHCA. Provide an agency representative to the EOC post disaster. Assist AHCA representative in maintaining communication with nursing homes in the County to asce rtain the status and needs of the facilities. Florida Power & Light (FPL) Provide staff to support EOC Infrastructure Branch during activation. Report system operability. Maintain a website to inform and educate t he general public on emergency preparedness. Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce (GMCC) Create and promote economic progress in Miami Dade County. Support sustainable economic development. Advocate to enhance the business environment. Participate in ESF 18 ( Business & Recovery) Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau (GMCVB) Provide staff to support ESF 6 ( Mass Care ) Provide representative to the 3 1 1 Answer Center to answer calls coming into Tourism Hotline. Provide information on large size events scheduled during the activation. Coordinate evacuation information to temporary residents, hotels, and travelers. Contact evacuating hotels and assist with evacuation to partner hotels. Provide regular updates to ESF 14 (P ublic Information ) regarding ho tel status, guest assistance, etc. Work to find hotel rooms for first responders and disaster victims. Provide business recovery information to tourism industry. Serve as liaison to Miami Consular Corp. Jackson Memorial Hospital (JMH) Establish a command center for the coordination of the Medical Management Facilities (MMF) at the Evacuation Support Center.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 97 of 237 Manage the operation of all MMFs, assign last minute EEAP registrants and prioritize requests for r esources in support of MMF. Provide adequate h ealth care staff for the operation of the Medical Evacuation Center s Miami Beach Tourism and Convention Division Communicate with its various constituencies and national and international consumers during an eme rgency. Minimize potential impact on long t erm business likely to occur in the aftermath of a crisis or genera t ed by inaccurate media reports. Partner with Greater Miami and the Beaches during an emergency and in the aftermath. Deploy a Crisis Response Team (CRT) in the event of a crisis. Miami Da de County Fair and Exposition Provide use of Darwin Fuchs Pavilion as a pet friendly hurricane evacuation center, logistical sta g ing area or post disaster temporary housing. Miami Dade County Public Schools (MDCPS) Serve as support to ESF 6 ( Mass Care ) d uring EOC activation. Liaison with School Superintendent for announcement of school closings or openings post disaster. Coordinate with American Red Cross and DEM the opening and operation of school designated evacu ation centers. Provide support to evacuat ion centers as outlined in MDCPS emergency procedures. Implement transportation and family reunification plans as outlined in the Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant plan. Provide an adequate number of ambulatory and wheelchair accessible vehicles and staff t o tran s port special needs residents to evacuation centers. Support damage assessment activities. M iami Dade Public Schools Police (MDPSP) Coordinate & provide staffing of of ficers at primary evacuation shelters. Collect data on current operational and resource status of own agency. Develop priority list of incidents within own jurisdiction. Coordinate damage assessment missions of school infrastructure. Develop de mobilizatio n plan. Municipal Fire, Police, Public Works Departments, and Building Officials Assist in the staffing of police officers in evacuation centers. Communicate with EOC via appropriate Divisional EOC Lead Municipality. Provide damage assessment information for their specific jurisdiction.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 98 of 237 Private Ambulances Assist with the evacuation of medical facilities and registrants in the Emergency Evacuation Assi s tance Program. Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) Serve as support agency for ESF 2 ( Communic ations ) during EOC activation. Staff EOC radio room during activation. Provide communication support to various locations throughout the county such as shelters, hosp i tals. Provide communication support to damage assessment teams. Salvation Army Serve as support agency to ESF 11 ( Food and Water ) during EOC activation. Provide mass care services to disaster victims via canteen trucks. Provide food and water for distribution by mass care agencies. Provide for and implement emergency aid station services Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) Serve as support agency for ESF 6 ( Mass Care ) and ESF 15 (V olunteer and Donations ) during the r ecovery phase. Serve as the clearinghouse for coordinating the provision of services and volunteers to assi st with the delivery and distribution of food, water and supplies to disaster vi c tims. Coordinate the response by social agencies, faith based organizations, and county agencies to ide n tify and meet long term and unmet needs following the response to a di saster. Help identify appropriate facilities for sto r age of bulk items. Assist Unmet Needs Committee by contacting appropriate member agencies or other voluntary organ izations able to meet the needs of the disaster victim. United Way of Miami Dade (UW) Pr ovide staff support to ESF 15 ( Volunteer and Donations ) during EOC activation. Coordinate management of donations post disaster. Solicit support from private industry through financial donations or in kind donations to assist with reco very operations. Man age Volunteer Reception Center. Utility Companies that report system operability: Atlantic Broadband AT&T* Comcast Cable CSX Corporation Florida City Gas Teco Peoples Gas

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 99 of 237 Vital Records Maintenance Natural and man made hazards can pose a significant th reat to the preservation of vital government re c ords. All county departments and non county organizations must ensure the protection of vital, permanent, or histo rical records. Protection of these records is the responsibility of Department Director or hi s/her d e signee This person acts as the custodian of the records for their respective department. Each depar t ment and organization must determine which records need to be preserved and must develop procedures that safeguard those re cords. Vital records are those that are essential to the continuation of the day to day operations and fun c tions. Such records may include but are not limited to Miami Dade County Code, County Commi s sion records, Miami Dade County fiscal records, court records, emergency opera tions plans and proc e dures, maps, lists of critical facilities, vital statistics, and land and tax records. Identification of those records considered vital by the department or organization; Documentation of the location of the original and any copies of the vital re c ords; Procedures for storing, backing up, and keeping copies of vital records in safe locations during daily ope rations and during emergency si tuations; Procedures for retrieval of vital re c ords after an emergency or disaster. PART 2 MIAMI DADE E MERGENCY MANAGEMENT CEMP Maintenance The M DEM is responsible for publishing the M i ami Dade CEMP and its revisions. The Director of M DEM or his/her de signee is responsible for ensuring that the CEMP is maintained, reviewed, and developed. A co mis conducted once every four years. All revised se ctions of the CEMP are complete d and available for dist ribution on the anniversary date of the fourth year. During the four years prior to the comprehensive revision, the M DEM will take as many opportunities as poss ible to review the effectiveness of the CEMP. Tabletop and full scale exercises, as well as, actual emergencies and disasters are the primary methods the M DEM employs to evaluate the CEMP. Fo l lowing each exercise and activation of the EOC, the M DEM conduct s critiques to determine those areas of the CEMP deemed insu fficient in meeting the needs o f the emergency or disaster. M DEM compile s all of these findings and incorp orate s them into the CEMP at the appropr i ate time. In addition to the comprehensive basic plan review process that occurs every four years, the M DEM co m plete s an annual update of those sections of the CEMP that contain time sensitive data such as the d e mographics section of the basic plan. The Subparts within the basic plan will are kept current at all times. In order to develop and mai n tain each Subpart within the basic plan, M DEM Coordinators and Planners are assigned to work in cooperation with fe deral, state, county, municipal, and private entities that have responsibility for, knowledge of, and experience in the specific issues a d dressed in a given subpart.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 100 of 237 The M DEM mainta in s a distribution list for the CEMP. All those persons or organizations recei v ing a copy of the CEMP are recorded in a dat a base. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) The MDEM Director or his/her designee has the overall responsibility for ensuring that the M DEM Operating Procedures (SOPs) and associated checklists are kept current. The Director or his designee a ssign s pe r sonnel from the M DEM to be accountable for the upkeep of specific policies and checklists. All other county departments an d organizations that have emergency response or recovery assignments are respons ible for developing and maintaining their own SOPs. These agencies designate an individ u al(s) to liaison with Miami Dade EOC as the disaster coordinator for their agency. Thi s person maintain s rela t ed SOPs. M DEM are exercised, reviewed, and revised on a continuous basis. A f ter action exercises are conducted to help critique those procedures and checklists that were fo l lo wed during the event to gauge for overall effectiveness. M DEM revise s the appropriate portions of its SOPs and chec k lists based upon the findings and recommendations from the after a c tion report. P REPAREDNESS PART 1 TRAINING General Miami Dade Emergenc y Management u ndertakes a constant year round approach in preparing a r e sponse, recovery, and mitigation effort. Aside from developing and maintaining a local CEMP, MDEM Coordin a tors and Planners engage in numerous training sessions dealing with hurricanes radiological emergencies, hazardous material emergencies, and mass casualty incidents. MDEM policy I 2 identifies the minimum training requir ements for MDEM staff and identifies the timeframe in which trainings must be completed. Roles The Training and Exercise Coordinator is responsible for performing periodic needs assessments to coord inate the training of all Miami Dade Emergency Management personnel. County and municipal age n cies that perform roles during emergencies and disasters will also rece ive adequate training. M DEM is responsible for providing community education to Miami Dade County organizations and cit i zens.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 101 of 237 Programs The training programs currently in place cover those topics that must be unde r stood by all M DEM staff and all other personnel of county and municipal agencies serving a policy or coordination role in emerge n cies and disasters. These programs are divided into 2 cat e gories developed by: 1. State/Federal; and 2. Miami Dade EM A list of current State and Federal Programs can be found at: www.floridadisaster.org and www.fema.gov A list of Miami Dade County EM Programs can be found at www.miamidade .gov/oem PART 2 EXERCISES Agencies The agencies that participate in these programs vary by type of exercise. Generally, there are agencies that will be exercised more frequently than others depending on the aspects being exa m ined. Agencies most likel y to be represented i n clude: M DEM ; Law Enforcement; Fire Rescue; MD Health Dept.; Transit Agencies; ARC; Procedures The Miami Dade EM Training and Exercise Coordinator develop s an Exercise Design Team involving repr esentatives of critical county and munic ipal agencies to help design, develop and implement exe r cises. The Training and Exercise Coordinator chair s the team and is responsible for all aspects of the exercise being i mplemented or resolved. The composition of the team depend s largely upon the sc enario of the e x ercise. The procedure utilized in developing the design of large scale functional exercises is to identify those a s pects that have not been recently tested or implemented (within 1 year), and develop objectives to examine those aspects. New procedures are tested for utility in the exercise. Exercise Design Team (EDT) members pr epare objectives for their respective agency types and later serve as controllers or evaluators during the exe rcise. Exercise evaluation is performed by like age ncies acting as evaluators. Evaluators ob serve the aspects of decision making and implementation. Deficiencies that are found are reviewed and reco m mendations are put forth for improvement and are developed as part of the exercise evaluation document. T he EDT Chair is the Chief Controller of the e x ercise unless the coordinator is an active player. In that circumstance, an appropriate replacement is selected. The person designated as the Chair is responsible for the develo p ment, distribution, and follow up of the evaluation doc u ment.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 102 of 237 M DEM annually schedules a major hurricane exercise in cooperation with the Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Radiological exercises are scheduled annually with Florida Power and Light (FPL) The Training Co ordinator schedules all other exercises on an as needed basis. PART 3 PUBLIC AWARENESS AND EDUCATION Subpart A General Responsibilities Public awareness and education prior to any emergency is crucial for successful public information efforts du ring and after an emergency. The r e sponsibility of educating the public lies with M DEM Programs The Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator works through a variety of programs to promote a high level of public awareness. Presentations are made regionally througho ut the County and as requested by various citizen groups. There are materials developed specifically for visitors, people with special needs, and other transient popul a tions. Education programs are also advanced by county and regional website s school cu rriculums, and public displays of preparedness info r mation. These programs are conducted in English, and when possible, in Spanish and Haitian Cr e ole. Subpart B Disseminating Public I n formation Emergency Public Information When an emergency threatens t he community, emergency instructions are distributed through the various commun i cations systems and social media outlets available to the EOC. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is used to deliver emergency messages about i m mediate threats to the general public via electronic media stations. Television and radio stations are provided with the capabi l ity to disasters, shelter loc a tions and assignments along with other emergency information. Miami Dade Alerts is used to transmit emergency notifications to wireless devices such as cellular phones, text pagers, Personal Data Assistance (PDA) devices and e mails. The 311 staff is also trained to answer questions from the public during an event. The 311 filters inform a tion gained from the public. The Social Media Unit Leader of the EOC Planning Section is responsible for the collection, evaluation, and tweeting of i n formation during a partial or full s cale activation. The EOC Planning Section Chief and the Lead PIO will vet information suitable for dissemination via social media and oversee the duties of the S o cial Media Unit Leader. The Social Media Unit Leader will monitor social media for informati on that may require a r esponse from the EOC. Prior to Level 2 or 1 EOC Activation social media information dissemination will be m munications. The Mayor, M DEM Director o r designee, the Office of Communications and the Lead PIO are the only "official" spokespersons for Miami Dade County who are authorized to release information to the m e dia

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 103 of 237 when the EOC is activated. All public information will be coordinated and approved by concerned agencies and departments and released by one of these individuals. A press room in the EOC a l lows the media outlets to broadcast directly from the EOC. There is also a dedicated, multi station fax system to provide scripted i nformati on to the electronic and print m e dia. The above communication tools are conducted in English, Spanish and whenever possible Haitian Creole. Particular emphasis is made to commun i cate with transient and tourist populations. EOC Human Services Branch Dire ctor functions as a liaison to FEMA and the State for community rel a tions activities at the EOC The EOC Human Services Branch Director with the support of ESF 15 and the DAE program coordin ator will be responsible for the coordination for community rela t ions response to i n clude the formation of the Community Relations Team (CRT) The Community Relations Team, in conjunction with the Coordinated Damage Assessment Team s and the GIS Unit with the use of Snapshot ( https://damage.miamidade.gov/ ) will determine the most critically damaged or impacted areas for the F EMA/State Team to focus on. CRT will conduct "outreach" activities in an effort to inform disaster victims co ncerning what programs are available, whe re the Disaster Recovery Centers are located and hours of oper ation. This outreach will be accomplished by utilizing all media resources and by assembling and deploying ou treach teams to remote areas to inform residents of assistance efforts. The EOC Human Services Branch D irector w ill coordinate with the PIO, the 311 Answer Center, other community response agencies such as M iami Dade VOAD Miami Dade Communities Org a nized to Respond to Emergencies (MD C.O.R.E.), county health and human services agencies, c ommunity service providers, community outreach programs, munic i pal liaisons, and civic leaders to ensure areas with major damage and with populations not likely to receive reco very information are identified and reached. A list of key community leaders to be contacted after an emerge ncy is maintained by the Office of the Mayor Refuges of Last Resort Some residents of Miami Dade County may find themselves without sufficient time to prepare or evacuate from storm surge areas. Locations of Refuges of Last R esort are communicated to the public primarily through electronic media when the EOC determines that the progress of a storm o ffers evacuees no other choice. GIS Maps Evacuation Areas The GIS maps that indicate the parts of Miami Dade County that are str ongly recommended to evacuate due to storm surge are included in Figure 1 9 Revised maps are supplied to all intereste d parties as early as po ssible. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PART 1 INTRODUCTION Authority The authority of all administrative support durin g the response and recovery phases of any given disaster e ncountered by Miami Dade County rests with the Mayor. The Mayor typically del e gates this responsibility to the

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 104 of 237 Deputy Mayor(s) who confers the duties of the administrative process on the Director o f Emergency Manag ement The above process provides the County with a three tiered line of su c cession. PART 2 PROCEDURES Miami Dade County employs a uniform code of administrative procedures that addresses the co m pletion and timely filing of all fina ncial reports. In the event of EOC activation, each county department assigned to an ESF incur s e x penses in performing their support and response functions. In most cases, t hose expenses are eligible for reimbursement by state or federal sources. All c osts, whether budgeted, unbudgeted or not reimbursed from state or Federal sources, are absorbed in their respective budgets. The departments and agencies are responsible for tracking and documenting their own expenses. Departments co m plete a FEMA compat ible daily activity report (DAR) that is processed pursuant to administrative procedures. Agencies that are not fiscally responsible to Miami Dade County must utilize their own established reporting procedures and submit suppor t ing documentation to the EO C

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 105 of 237 APPENDICES

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 106 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 1 (T RANSPORT A TION ) Part 1 General Introduction Emergency Support Function 1 deals with transportation issues during the preparation, response and r e covery phases of a disaster. Lead Agency Miami Dade Transit Agency (MDTA) Support Agencies Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Florida National Guard Miami Dade Aviation Department Miami Dade Corrections & Rehabilitation Department Miami Dade County Pu b lic Schools Miami Dade Expressway Authority Miami Dade Emergency Management Miami Dade Internal Services Depar t ment (I S D) Miami Dade Police Department Miami Dade Public Works & Waste Management Department Miami Dade Port Miami United States Coast Guard (USCG) Scope The availab le resources of ESF 1 may be defined as the personnel, technology, equipment, and supply r esources. The obtainable resources may be defined as the personnel, technology, equipment, facilities, mat erial, and supplies obtainable from contractors, vendors, s uppliers, related agencies of federal, state, and local governments, and public and private associations or organiz a tions. Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 1 to coordinate and facilitate the emergency transportation requirements of M iami Dade County during the response, and recovery phases of an incident or disaster. These requirements i n clude but are not limited to the following: Evacuation assistance Traffic control Debris clearance Logistical transportation Emergency repairs

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 107 of 237 Policies The availa ble and obtainable resources of the ESF 1 will be employed, in the event of an incident or disa s ter to acco m plish the following: Coordinate transportation resources for evacuations as a result of i mm i n e nt threat of an incident or di saster Coordinate drawb ridge lockdown and reopening schedules between USCG, marine interests and the bridge owners. Develop situation reports and action plans for all available modes of transportation and submit to the Operations Section Chief. Coordinate with ESF 3 (Public Work s & Engineering) and Debris Removal in facilitating the removal of obstructions from and the temporary repair of the transportation infr a structure. Coordinate the production and distribution of tran s portation maps. Part 2 Concept of Operations General Th e Infrastructure Branch Director in cooperation with the ESF 1 lead agency will, in the event of an i ncident or disaster, notify agencies to activate previously identified personnel to the duty roster in the M iami Dade EOC. It will be the responsibility o f the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director to notify all ESF 1 support age n cies (the ESF 1 support team) of any pending incident or disaster and to advise them of when and where their previously designated personnel are to report for duty if activation is re quired. Designated ESF 1 personnel must have the authority of their i n dividual agencies to commit available and obtainable resources without having to secure approval from any other management level. It will b e the responsibility of the ESF 1 support team to review and assess developing transportation problems and respond in the following manner: 1. Prepare periodic situation reports and submit to the Infrastructure Branch Dire c tor. 2. Assess developing transportation problems and coordinate corrective mea s ures. 3. Transportation resource requests submitted to ESF 1 will be copied to the Infrastructure Branch Dire ctor. Organization ESF 1 operates within the Infrastructure Branch and under the administration of the Operations Se c tion Chief. The Miami Dade Trans it Agency is the ESF 1 lead agency. In cooperation with the support agencies, Miami Dade Transit Agency is responsible for the coordination of the available and obtainable r e sources appl i cable to ESF 1.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 108 of 237 The Infrastructure Branch Director is responsible for ensuring the attendance and participation of desi gnated individuals within the support team at ESF 1 meetings, conferences, training, and exe r cises. The ESF 1 support team and the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director will, on an annual basis, review and rev ise, as necessary, the applicable se c tions of the Miami Dade CEMP. The ESF 1 support team, in conjunction with the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director will develop and maintain a database of emergency co n tact points. In conjunction with the Infrastructure B ranch Director, ESF 1 support will maintain a database of avail able and obtainable resources that may be employed on an as required base during or after an incident or disaster event. An inventory of MDTA vehicles available for use in a declared disaster is maintained by MDTA and u p dated monthly. The overall management of ESF 1 will be the responsibility of the EOC Infrastructure Branch Dire c tor. His or her duties will i n clude: 1. The establishment and maintenance of an ESF 1 duty roster insuring 24 hour co ntinuity of operation when required. 2. The maintenance and timely issuance of situation reports, as appropriate, to the Operations Section Chief. Communication Systems The primary Miami Dade EOC communications system utilized by ESF 1 will be a digital AT &T sy s tem. The Miami Dade EOC has other communications systems including an analog telephone system, a sa tellite communications link with the state EOC amateur radio systems capable of communicating with outside agencies and a standard satellite telephone ESF 1 Interface ESF e sources. ESF 1 will interface with the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director when seeking available and obtai n able the Infrastructure Branch. ESF 1 will exhaust all available and obtainable resources before turning a request for support or r esources over to ESF 7 (Resource Support ). Responsibilities It will be the responsibility of ESF 1 to develop and maintain an inv entory of vehicles to be used for emergency transportation. It will be the responsibility of the ESF 1 support team to compile and maintain a fueling list and to ensure that arrangements are in place to secure priority fueling of ESF 1 veh i cles. Arrangeme nts by ISD are in place with the Miami Dade fuel vendors to provide priority handling for the r gency. Transportation operations management will be coordinated by ESF 1 in conjunction with the various field oper ations, which will include driver notification, traffic regulation, pick up point identification, pre positioning of equipment, and inte r face with law enforcement.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 109 of 237 Preparation During the preliminary phases, prior to the advent of an incident or disaster, a number of prepar a tory tasks must be accomplished. The following represents a list of those preparatory actions for ESF 1: 1. Contact the designated ESF 1 agencies. 2. Arrange for 24 hour continuity of operation and set up duty roster and attendance logs, as a nticipated conditions require. 3. Ascertain the special transportation requirements for advanced life support (ALS) and basic life support (BLS) patients and Persons with Special Needs (PSN) and coordinate the mobilization of necessary transportation r e source s. 4. Coordinate transportation requirements for evacuation of at risk populations. 5. Activate infrastructure operations such as bridge lock down and reprogramming of traffic si g nals. 6. Order pre positioning of equipment and resources based upon projected requ irements. 7. Perform a transportation vulnerability assessment based upon the predicted intensity and i m pact zone of the incident or event. Submit the evaluation to the EOC Operations Section Chief through the EOC Infr astructure Branch Director. 8. Prepare situ ation reports for submission to the EOC Operations Section Chief. Response The response phase of an incident or disaster requires the coordinated completion of a number of specific a ctions by ESF 1. The following represents a list of those b a sic response a ctions: 1. Receive, evaluate, coordinate, and implement support and r e source requests for ESF 1. 2. Continue 24 hour continuity of operation as required and ensure that sufficient staff is assigned to the ESF 1 duty roster to maintain operation during the proje cted operational p e riod. 3. Provide sufficient shift overlap to facilitate and orderly transfer of information from one shift to the next. 4. Maintain duty roster and attendance log as r e quired. 5. Coordinate available manpower and equipment resources to insure con tinuous 24 hour operation of transportation vehicles when and if required. These resources include drivers and maintenance pe rsonnel. Additional drivers and maintenance personnel may be drawn from existing supervisory staff as required to suppl e ment any s taffing deficiencies that may arise. 6. Prepare situation reports for dissemination to the Operations Section Chief through the Infrastru c ture Branch Director. Recovery The Recovery period is divided into two basic phases. The first phase, Short Term Recover y b e gins while the Response Phase is ending. Short term recovery can be defined as that period of time when the temp o rary restorations of daily activities are implemented. The coordin a tion of this phase of the recovery process is the direct respo n sibilit y of the Miami Dade EOC. The following represents a synopsis of the Short Term Recovery responsibilities of the ESF 1 support team: 1. Evaluate the transportation needs relative to continued sheltering, re entry into previously evacuated ar eas, and the move ment of the general and special needs populations. 2. Arrange transportation for damage assessment as needed.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 110 of 237 3. Coordinate transportation in support of Disaster Assistance Ce n ters (DACs). 4. Coordinate the transportation of food and water to staging a r eas and di stribution sites. 5. Receive, evaluate, coordinate, and impl e ment support and resource requests for ESF 1. 6. Review the staffing needs for 24 hour contin u ity of operation with the Infrastructure Branch Director. 7. Maintain the duty roster and atte n dance log as r equired. 8. Prepare situation reports for dissemination to the Operations Section Chief via the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. 9. Plan for the orderly transfer of operations to other Miami Dade County departments. Long Term Recovery is the permanent restor ation of the daily activities and infrastructure and is the respons ibility of the indivi d ual agencies impacted by the incident or disaster. Transportation Requests The establishment of priorities and the coordination of activities designed to fulfill the t ransport a tion needs of the community before, during, and after the advent of an incident or disaster will be under the direct co n trol of ESF 1. The procedure for receiving, evaluating, prioritizing, and acting upon emergency transportation r esource reques ts are as follows: 1. ESF 1 receives the resource request from one of the Branch Directors. 2. A copy of the request is forwarded to the Infr a structure Branch Director. 3. ESF 1 will then prioritize the request based upon comparative urgency and available r e source s. 4. ESF 1 will advise, in writing, an estimated completion time and submit the estimate to the EOC Infrastru cture Branch Director. 5. In the event the resource request exceeds the available and obtainable resources of ESF 1, the r e quest will be submitted to th e Logistics Section Chief for additional resources or mutual aid assistance. Each agency within ESF 1 is individually responsible for the maintenance and control of all resources i n cluding vehicles, equipment, facilities, personnel, and material. EMER GENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 2 ( COMMUNIC A TIONS ) Part 1 General Introduction Emergency Support Function 2 deals with the issue of communications during the response and recovery phases of a disaster. Lead Agency Miami Dade Information Technology D e partment ( I TD )

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 111 of 237 Support Agencies Amateur Radio Public Service Corps AT&T Florida National Guard Miami Dade Fire Rescue Department Miami Dade Department of Emergency Management Miami Dade Police Department United States Coast Guard Scope The available resources of E SF 2 may be defined as the personnel, technology, equipment, and supply resources. The obtainable resources may be defined as the personnel, technology, equipment, facilities, mater i al, and supplies obtainable from contractors, vendors, suppliers, related agencies of federal, state, and l ocal governments, and public and private associations or organ i zations. Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 2 to provide and c o ordinate communication equipment and services to Miami Dade County for field operations duri ng the response and recovery phases of an incident or disa s ter. Policies The resources of ESF 2 will be employed in the event of an incident or disaster to accomplish the follo w ing: The establishment and maintenance of emergency communications between th e Miami Dade EOC and the state EOC communications at departmental operations cen ters, communications between the M iami Dade EOC and the Municipal Branch es, communications between the Miami Dade EOC and all mass care and shelter facil i ties. The repair, rep lacement, or relocation of repeaters to enable the fullest use of the 800 MHZ mobile communication systems. The repair or temporary installation of radio antennas. Perform the initial survey of the communications infrastructure to assess damage and priorit ize r e pair. Part 2 Concept of Operations General In the event of an incident or disaster, Miami Dade IT D, as lead ESF 2 agency, will notify agencies to activate previously identified personnel to the duty roster in the Miami Dade EOC. It will be the resp onsibility of the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director to notify all ESF 2 support age n cies (the ESF 2 support team) of any pending incident or disaster and to advise them of when and where their personnel are to report for duty if act i vation is required. ES F 2 is responsible for arranging staffing patterns of available manpower to insure continuous 24 hour operation if r e quired. Designated ESF 2 personnel must have the authority of their individual age n cies to commit available and obtainable agency resources without having to secure approval from any other management level.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 112 of 237 It will be the responsibility of the ESF 2 team to review and assess any developing communications problems and respond in the follo w ing manner: 1. Assess developing communication proble ms, develop corrective actions, and implement on a prio r ity basis. The priority for the repair of communications systems damaged by an incident is as fo l lows: 800 MHz System HF system Satellite communications link County telephones 2. Prepare periodic situa tion reports and submit to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Dire c tor. Resource support requests, received by ESF 2, will be evaluated, prior i tized and acted upon if the resource request is technically practical and within the objectives for the incident, res ponse or r e covery. Organization ESF 2 operates within the EOC Infrastructure Branch The Miami Dade ITD in conjunction with the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director, is responsible for the o p eration of ESF 2. The EOC Infrastructure Branch Director is respon sible for coordinating the attendance and partic i pation of designated agencies within the ESF 2 support team in meetings, conferences training sessions, and exercises. The EOC Infrastructure Branch Director and the ESF 2 support team will, on an annual ba sis, review and revise, as necessary, the applicable se c tions of the Miami Dade CEMP. The EOC Infrastructure Branch Director, along with ITD will establish and maintain a database of avai lable and obtainable resources that may be employed on an as require d basis during or after an incident or di s aster. The EOC Infrastructure Branch Director, along with the ITD will develop and maintain a database of emergency co n tact points. The overall administration and coordination of the ESF 2 team will be the respons ibility of the EOC I nfrastructure Branch Director, his or her d u ties will include: The establishment and maintenance of an ES F 2 duty roster, insuring 24 hour continuity of operation when required. Maintenance and timely issuance of situation reports to th e EOC Operations Se c tion Chief. Prior to a disaster declaration, all amateur radio operations within the EOC are handled by the Am a teur Radio Emergency Service (ARES). The ARES Emergency Coordinator governs the operation of ARES within the EOC. When a de claration is issued, the responsibility for amateur radio operations within the EOC shifts to Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services (RACES). The RACES Officer or the Assistant RACES Officer controls the operation of RACES within the EOC.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 113 of 237 Direction and Co ntrol As the lead agency, IT D will manage and control the operation of ESF 2. ESF 2 will provide r e sources that include contracts for goods and services, liaison with response and recovery t eams, and radiolog ical emergencies. The procedure for receiving, prioritizing, and acting upon emergency communication resource r e quests is as fo l lows: 1. The EOC Infrastructure Branch Director receives the resource request from another Branch Director or from the EOC Operations Section Chief. The request is then passed on to the ESF 2 lead agency. 2. The ESF 2 lead agency sends the request to the ESF 2 team for evaluation and prioritization based upon available equi p ment and manpower. 3. The lead agency will advise, in writing, an estimated completion time and submit the estim ate to the EOC Infrastructure Branch D i rector. Communication Systems The primary communication system in use by Miami Dade County Agencies is the AT&T digital tel ephone system. The Miami Dade EOC has s econdary communication systems such as the commercial H F system and the 800 MHz system with repeaters strategically positioned throughout the county. This system permits mobile communication with survey teams, municipal branch and satellite EOCs and disaster workers throughout the county. The Miami Dade EOC a lso has two other communication systems a satellite communications link with the s tate EOC and a series of am a teur radio transmitters. The employment of the these communication systems enables the Miami Dade EOC to receive and transmit information to the municipal branch EOCs, local and state governmental agencies, the state EOC, and various ESF groups, Functional tests of the EOC communications system are performed quarterly, as well as, during each radiological and hurricane exe r cise. ESF 2 Interface E SF 2 is obliged to interface with all support groups, both in the operations arena and in the support se c tion. Responsibilities It is the responsibility of ESF 2 to establish and maintain a liaison with all recognized communication groups, as required, within Miami Dade County, inclu d ing the following: o Governmental agencies o Private industry o Electronic media o Amateur radio (RACES) It is the responsibility of ESF 2 to maintain the operational status of all communication systems and i nsure the timely transmi ssion and receipt of messages with sufficient clarity to permit full understanding of the me s sages.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 11 4 of 237 Preparation During the preliminary phases, prior to the advent of an incident or disaster a number of preparatory tasks must be accomplished. The following represents a list of those preparatory actions: 1. Contact the designated ESF 2 agencies. 2. Arrange for 24 hour continuity of operations and set up the duty roster, as conditions r e quire. 3. Confirm municipal branch EOC activations and test communication system s. 4. The ESF 2 lead agency establishes contact with the state ESF 2 counte r part. 5. Note any communication system that does not meet operational status and report to the EOC Infrastru cture Branch Director. Response The response phase of an incident or disaster requires that a number of tasks be accomplished by ESF 2. The following represents a list of those b a sic response actions: 1. Receive, evaluate, and support resource r e quests for ESF 2. 2. Arrange for 24 hour continuity of oper a tion and review periodically. 3. Esta blish duty roster and sign in/out log. 4. Confirm operational status of all local communication systems, including those established at mass care and shelter facilities, and establish co n tact with the state and municipal branch EOCs. Repeat operational statu s checks per i odically. 5. Review preliminary vulnerability and create an evaluation based upon predicted incident co n ditions and transmit situation report to the Infrastru c ture Branch Director. 6. Collect information relative to ESF 2 and prepare situation rep orts on a frequency to be dete r mined by the EOC Operations Section Chief. Recovery The recovery phase of an incident or disaster places an entirely new set of duties and responsibil i ties upon ESF 2. The following represents a list of those basic recovery a c tions: 1. Receive, prioritize, and evaluate recovery r e source requests. 2. Check communication systems for operational status in emergency shelters, mass care facilities, fee d ing sites, distribution sites, staging areas, and disaster application ce n ters. 3. Plan and execute the repair, replacement or relocation of communication system equipment to meet the communication needs of the disaster workers. 4. Continue the maintenance of 24 hour continuity of operation. Insure that adequate shift overlap time is provided fo r the orderly transfer of shift operations.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 115 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 3 ( PUBLIC WORKS & ENGINEE RING ) Part 1 General Introduction Emergency Support Function 3 deals with the issue of public works and engineering during the r e sponse and recovery phases of a disaster. Lead Agency Miami Dade Public Works & Waste Management (PWWD) Department Support Agencies AT&T FPL Florida National Guard Miami Dade Aviation D e partment Miami Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Depar t ment (RER) Miami Dade County Cooper ative Extension Se r vice Miami Dade Public Works and Waste Management Department Miami Dade Emergency Management Miami Dade Parks Recreation & Open Spaces Department Miami Dade Transit Agency Miami Dade Water and Sewer Department Florida City Gas Company Teco Peoples Gas South Florida Water Management District Scope The available resources of ESF 3 may be defined as personnel, technology, equipment, and supply r esources. The obtainable resources of ESF 3 may be defined as the personnel, technology, equipm ent, facil i ties, material, and supply resources obtainable from contractors, vendors, suppliers, and related agencies, of federal, state, and local governments, public and private associ a tions or groups. Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 3 to provide and coordinate public works and engineering services to the D epartment of Emergency Management effort during the response, recovery, and mitigation phases of a di s aster. The resources of ESF 3 will be employed in the event of an incident or disaster to a cco m plish the following:

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 116 of 237 Emergency debris clearance for the restoration of basic transportation in order to provide access to crit ical facilities. A detailed account of emergency debris clearance policies and practices may be found in the Coordinated Deb ris Clearance document maintained at M DEM Emergency repair, rerouting, or cl o sure of damaged facilities. Emergency repair or closure of potable water, sanitary sewer, storm water collection, generators, and electrical distr i bution systems. The emergency s tabilization or demolition of public and/or private structures to facilitate search and re scue or to protect the health and welfare of the comm u nity. Perform the initial survey of infrastructure da m age and prioritize preliminary repair. Perform a vulnerabi lity survey and assessment of damage to hazardous waste storage, generation, di stribution and di s posal sites. Restoration of electrical, telephone, natural gas and cable television sy s tems. Part 2 Concept of Operations General As the lead agency, Miami D ade Public Works & Waste Management Department will notify age n cies to activate previously identified personnel to the duty roster in the M i ami Dade EOC. It will be the responsibility of the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director to notify all ESF 3 agencies o f any pending incident or emergency and to advise them of when and where their previously designated pe rson nel are to report for duty if a ctivation is r e quired. It will be the responsibility of ESF 3 Team to review and asses deve l oping infrastructure and e ngineering problems and respond in the fo l lowing manner: 1. Prepare periodic situation reports and submit to the Infrastructure Branch Dire c tor. 2. Assess ESF 3 related problems, develop corrective measures, and submit response and short term recovery action pla ns to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. Organization ESF 3 operates within the EOC Infrastructure Branch u n der the EOC Operations Section Chief. The EOC Infrastructure Branch Director is responsible for coordinating the attendance and particip a tion of ESF 3 in meetings, conferences, training sessions, and exercises. The Infrastructure Branch Director and ESF 3 support team will, on an annual basis, review and r e vise, as necessary, the applicable sections of the M i ami Dade CEMP. The EOC Infrastructur e Branch Director, along with the lead agency, will develop and maintain a dat abase of emergency contact points. ESF 3 will establish and maintain a database of resources that may be employed on an as required b asis during or after an incident or disaster. The database will include engineering services, construction resources and any materials that may require pre positioning in the preparation phase of an anticipated incident or disaster. The overall administration and coordination of ESF 3 will be the r esponsibility of the ESF 3 lead agency whose duties will i n clude: 1. The establishment and maintenance of an ESF 3 duty roster insuring 24 hour continuity of operation when required.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 117 of 237 2. Maintaining the timely issuance of situation reports, as appropriate, to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. Designated ESF 3 personnel must have the authority of their individual agencies to commit available and obtainable agency resources without having to secure approval from any other management level. Direction and Cont rol The procedures for receiving, evaluating, and prioritizing resource r e quests is as follows: 1. ESF 3 receives the resource r e quest from the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. 2. ESF 3 will then prioritize the request based upon urgency, available man power and equipment r esources. 3. ESF 3 will then advise in writing, an estimated completion time and submit this to the Infrastructure Branch Director. Each agency within ESF 3 is individually responsible for the maintenance of an inve n tory of available and obtainable resources including vehicles, equipment, facilities, perso n nel, and material. Communication Systems The Miami Dade EOC primary commun i cation system is the AT&T digital phone system The Miami Dade EOC secondary communication system is a comme rcial HF radio system with a bac kup 800 MHz transmitter and repeaters strategically located throughout the County to provide countywide networking and communic a tion. A satellite communications link with the state EOC and several amateur (Ham) radio systems are also oper a tional within the Miami Dade EOC ESF 3 Interface ESF with in the Miami Dade Emergency Op erations Ce n ter. During the preliminary phases prior to the advent of an incident or disaster, a numbe r of preparatory tasks must be accomplished. The following represents a list of those basic preparatory a c tions: 1. Contact the designated ESF 3 personnel. 2. Arrange for sufficient staff to provide for a co n tinuous 24 hour continuity of operation at the EOC. 3. C onfirm the municipal branch EOC activations and initiate the points of contact databases within each ESF 3 support group as they act i vate. 4. ESF 3 lead agency then establishes co n tact and liaison with the state ESF 3 at the state EOC. 5. Perform a preliminary v ulnerability evaluation based upon predicted conditions and transmit to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. 6. Confirm operational status of all notif i cation, communication and support systems relevant to ESF 3. Response The response phase of an inci dent or disaster requires that a number of tasks be accomplished by ESF 3. The following represents a list of those b a sic response actions:

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 118 of 237 1. Receive, distribute, and evaluate support and response resource r e quests. 2. List items for inclusion in the situation reports. 3. Collect information and prepare situation reports on a frequency to be agreed upon with the EOC Oper ations Section Chief. 4. Review team rosters to ensure cont i nuity of operation. Recovery The recovery phase of an incident or disaster places an entir ely new set of duties and responsibil i ties upon ESF 3. The following represents a list of those basic recovery a c tions: 1. Receive, distribute, and evaluate resource requests for the area affected by the incident or di s aster. 2. List items for inclusion in the briefings and situation reports. 3. Activate the deployment of IDA teams, mutual aid teams, and other emergency work teams in the di s aster area as r e quired. 4. Continue the maintenance of continuity of operation. Insure adequate shift overlap to allow for transm i ssion of inform a tion. EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUN C TION 4 ( FIREFIGHTING ) PART 1 General Introduction Emergency Support Function 4 deals with the issue of firefighting during the response and recovery pha s es of a disaster. Lead Agency Miami Dade Fire Rescue Department (MDFR) Support Agencies Coral Gables Fire Rescue Department Hialeah Fire Rescue Department Key Biscayne Fire Rescue Department Miami Fire Rescue Department Miami Beach Fire Rescue Department Miami Dade Water and Sewer Department Scope The ESF 4 lead and appropriate support agencies will become operational when the Miami Dade Eme r gency Operations Center (EOC) activates at a Level II, or I in response to any major emergency or disa s ter. The available resources of ESF 4 include personnel, facilitie s, equipment, vehicles and supplies. The obtainable resources of ESF 4 are pe r sonnel, equipment, vehicles and supplies from federal, state and local governments, as well as private organizations.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 119 of 237 Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 4 to provide and c oordinate fire protection and suppression se r vices within the county during response and recovery phases of a disaster. This is to be accomplished by use of the avai l able and obtainable resources, which will be deployed to achieve the following: Suppress fires. Conduct search and rescue operations. Inspect facilities to determine if fire hazards exist that endanger the occupants and community. Inspection of fire hydrants to assure operation and adequate water supply prior to re population of a community. Support ESF 8 in providing medical assistance for disa s ter victims. Support ESF 8 in assuring adequate EMS coverage in impacted areas prior to re population of comm unities. PART 2 Concept of Operations General Miami Dade Fire Rescue Depar t ment is the le ad agency for ESF 4. The EOC Public Safety Branch Director will notify the ESF 4 primary contact in the event of an inc i dent or disaster. ESF 4 shall monitor developing problems, prioritize and develop plans to mitigate incidents or co n cerns. Organization ESF 4 operates within the EOC Public Safety Branch under the EOC Operations Section Chief. The Public Safety Branch Director is responsible for managing the availability and participation of desi gnated individuals within ESF 4. The Public Safety Branch Di rector will review and update this section of the Miami Dade CEMP as needed or annually at a minimum. The EOC Public Safety Branch Direct or will coordinate with the ESF 4 lead agency to maintain an emergency co n tact list. MDFR, as lead for ESF 4, will be r equired to establish and maintain a database of available r e sources that may be required for a disaster. Designated ESF 4 personnel must have the delegated authority of their agency to commit and pr o cure re sources as needed. Dire c tion and Control The proc edures for receiving, evaluating, prioritizing and dispatching firefighting resource requests are as fo llows: 1. ESF 4 may receive resource requests from the EOC Operations Section Chief, a Branch Director, or any agency representative in the EOC. 2. The ESF 4 p rioritizes these resource requests based upon urgency and avail a ble resources. 3. ESF 4 will then annotate, in Web EOC an est i mated completion time and cost.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 120 of 237 4. It is the responsibility of the EOC Public Safety Branch Director to monitor any and all resource r e quests aligned with ESF 4 and a s sure appropriate action is taken. 5. If the resource request exceeds available resources, a request is made to the EOC Logistic s Se c tion for mutual aid. 6. ESF 4 has a direct link communication to their command post. 7. ESF 4 will i nterface with the EOC Public Safety Branch Director to expedite the priorities of the fun c tion. The EOC Public Safety Branch Director will facilitate and act as the liaison between the ESF and the ot her B ranches. Preparation During the preliminary phases p rior to a disaster, the following tasks must be acco m plished: 1. Contact the designated ESF 4 support pe r sonnel. 2. Arrange for 24 hour coverage. 3. Establish communications with State ESF 4. 4. Perform a preliminary vulnerability evaluation based upon predicted condi tions and transmit to the EOC Public Safety Branch Director. 5. Confirm operation of all notification and co m munication systems. 6. Acquire an updated inventory list of avai l able resources from all firefighting agencies within the county. Response The response p hase of an incident or disaster requires that a number of tasks be accomplished by ESF 4. The following represents a list of those b a sic response actions: 1. Receive, distribute, and evaluate resource r e quests. 2. Make arrangement s for hosting out of county ESF 4 responders. 3. List items for inclusion on the situation r e ports. 4. Maintain a duty log. Recovery The recovery phase of an incident or disaster places an entirely new set of duties and responsibil i ties upon ESF 4. The following represents a list of those bas ic recovery a c tions: 1. Receive, distribute, and evaluate resource r e quests. 2. List items for inclusion on the situation r e ports. 3. Establish staging areas of mutual aid respon d ers and deploy these teams as needed. 4. Assure adequate coverage for each shift.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 121 of 237 EMERGE NCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 5 ( PLANNING ) PART 1 General Introduction ESF 5 is responsible for the collection, analysis, evaluation, and dissemination of information regarding an emergency or disaster. The Planning ESF assesses the incident, the impact of the i ncident, develops a c tion plans to guide the direction of the response and recovery phases, and plans for the demobilization of the M iami Dade EOC. Lead Agency Miami Dade Emergency Management Support Agencies Miami Dade Fire Rescue Florida Department of Law Enforcement Miami Dade Police Department Information Technology Department Miami Dade Communications Miami Dade Community Information and Outreach Department ( 311 ) Scope The EOC Planning Sectio n (ESF 5) is utilized when the EOC is activ ated at a Level 2 or greater. While the responsibilities and objectives of the Planning Section do not change with the levels of activation, the means by which the objectives are accomplished is based on the complexity of the response and the number of av ai lable pe r sonnel to assist the EOC. Purpose ESF 5 of the Miami Dade Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is responsible for the collection, analysis, evaluation, and dissemination of information regarding an incident. Information is needed to: Understand the scope of the current situ a tion/incident. Predict the probable course of incident events. Prepare alternative strategies and o p erations of the incident. Develop action plans to guide the dire c tion of response and recovery efforts. Disseminate plans and information to the appropriate audiences via the most effective means. Policies The available and obtainable resources of ESF 5 will be employed in the event of an emergency or disa s ter to accomplish the objectives outlined in the Miami Dade EOC Planning S ection Standard Operating Proc e dures (SOPs). The objectives include the fo l lowing: 1. Obtain initial briefing regarding the inc i dent.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 122 of 237 2. Receive briefing on initial information from the Incident Commander and/or Duty Officer. 3. Discuss with the Incident Command er, the level of involvement in the incident for Emergency Manag ement and the Emergency Operations Ce n ter. 4. Obtain a summary of resources and agencies currently involved in the response to the inc i dent (if any). 5. Prepare a strategy (i.e., incident action p lan) for the immediate near future (i.e., the next 4 to 24 hours). 6. Establish time intervals for operational per i ods. 7. Prepare a list of agencies, departments, and/or individuals that will be contacted and re pr e sented at the EOC for activ a tion s 8. Compile and display incident asses s ment and status information. 9. Develop alternative response or recovery strat e gies. 10. Identify need for use of specialized r e sources. 11. Provide periodic predictions on incident pote n tial. 12. Prepare and dist ribute the Incident Action Plan 13. Prepare an EOC demobilization plan. PART 2 Concept of Operations General 1. In the event of an emergency or disaster, Miami Dade Emergency Management as lead age n cy for ESF 5, will assign personnel to the Planning Se c tion 2. It will be the responsibi lity of the EOC Planning Section Chief to notify ESF 5 support agencies and pe rsonnel of any pending incident or major emergency and to advise them of when and where the desi g nated personnel are to report for duty should activation be required. 3. It will be the responsibility of the EOC Planning Section to review and assess the developing incident i nformation and accomplish the ESF objectives pursuant to the Miami Dade EOC Planning Section Stan dard Operating Procedures. Organization 1. Planning operates as a su b section of the Miami Dade Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The Pla nning Section Chief, manages the Unit.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 123 of 237 2. The EOC Planning Section Chief is responsible for coordinating the attendance and participation of desi gnated individuals in the incident plannin g process pursuant to the Miami Dade EOC Planning Section Standard Operating Procedures. 3. The Planning team will meet annually to review and revise, if necessary, the applicable se c tions of the Miami Dade CEMP. 4. Miami Dade Emergency Management will develop and maintain a database of emergency contact pe rsonnel to staff the Planning and Information function s during activation of the EOC. 5. The overall administration and coordination of the EOC Planning Section w ill be the responsibility of the EOC Planning Se ction Chief as outlined in the Planning Section SOPs. Direction and Control The EOC Planning Section Chief who reports directly to the EOC Incident Commander will coordinate a c tions taken by ESF 5. ESF 5 Interface 1. The EOC Planning Section interfaces with all personnel and age n cies in the EOC to obtain information relative to the inc i dent. 2. The Planning Section Chief will interface with ESF 5 at the State EOC to provide, coordinate, and share relevant disaster information and planning strategies necessary for addressing incident and disaster situ ations with the SEOC and all local r e sponse agencies. 3. The EOC Planning Section is responsible for the mission tracking and message control center that r eceives all incoming messages not specifically directed to an ESF. Each message is transcribed and deli vered to the appropriate agency for action, as are all inter agency communications and requests. Copies of these request slips are sorted and tracked by ESF cat e gory. Preparation During the preliminary phases pr ior to an emergency or disaster, a number of preparatory tasks must be a ccomplished. The following represents a list of those basic preparatory a c tions: 1. Discuss with the Incident Commander, the level of involvement in the incident for E mergency Manag emen t and the Emergency Operations Ce n ter. 2. Obtain a summary of resources and agencies currently involved in the response to the inc i dent (if any). 3. Prepare an initial strategy, if possible. 4. Prepare a list of all agencies, departments, and/or individuals that will be contacted and repr e sented at the EOC for activ a tion s

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 124 of 237 5. Assemble alternative strat e gies. 6. Identify need for use of specialized r e sources. 7. Provide periodic predictions on incident pote n tial. Response The EOC Planning Section will assist in the impl ementation of the EOC Planning Section SOPs by d o ing the follo w ing: 1. Establish time intervals for operational period cycles. Arrange for 24 hour continuity of operation utili z ing support agency staff as required. Provide for a shift overlap to insure con tinuity of information and pla nning. 2. Input information from the Operations Section into Arc View and compile informational maps using e x tant GIS programs and the EOC X Y plotter. 3. Compile and display incident assessment and status information on the whit e boards in the Planning Se ction Conference Room; incorporate into incident action plans. 4. Assemble alternative strat e gies. 5. Identify need for use of specialized r e sources. 6. Collect and process information regarding r e covery activities while the response p hase of the disaster is ongoing 7. Develop incident action plans to identify projected operational objectives and requirements for the reco very phase. 8. Anticipate the types of recovery information the Operations Section will require. 9. Compile information to support recovery activ i ties. Recovery The recovery phase of an emergency or disaster places an entirely new set of duties and respo n sibilities upon ESF 5. The following represents a list of those basic recovery a c tions: 1. Assist the EOC Operations Section and the EOC Infrastructure Branch in developing long term reco v ery strategies; incorporate these strategies into the incident action plans. 2. Work with state and federal agencies by sharing appropriate information that works to ensure coord i nated recovery efforts.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 125 of 237 3. Prepare an EOC demobiliz a tion plan. EMERGENCY SUPPORT F UN C TION 6 ( MASS CARE ) PART 1 GENERAL Introduction ESF 6 deals with the issue of providing mass care during the response and recovery phases of a di s aster. Lead Agency American Red Cross S outh Florida Region (ARC) Support Agencies Crisis Response Team Florida Department of Children & Families (DCF) Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau Miami Dade County Public Schools Miami Dade County Public Schools Police D e partment Miami Dade Commun ity Action and of Human Services Department ( CA HS) Miami Dade Health Department Miami Dade Internal Services Department Miami Dade Public Housing and Community Development Miami Dade Fire Rescue Miami Dade Police Department Municipal Fire Rescue Departmen ts Municipal Police Departments Salvation Army Miami Dade Voluntary Organizations Active in Disa s ter ( MD VOAD ) Scope ESF 6 will coordinate and plan the following activ i ties: Open and operate evacuation centers for pe o ple who must evacuate due to a disas ter or a potential threat. Make provisions for temporary housing for people whose homes are uninhabitable after the di saster. Provide food and water to the evacuation centers, disaster relief centers and other estab lished fee d ing sites. Provide comfort i tems and services to people affected by or responding to the disaster. This would i nclude social and mental health se r vices. Provide centralized registration and inquiry se r vice on evacuees.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 126 of 237 Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 6 to provide and coordin ate mass care services to the county emerge n cy management effort during response and recovery phases of a disaster. Mass Care services are d esigned to provide for basic human needs before, during and after a disaster. Mass Care includes services such as temporary sheltering, feeding, first aid, clothing, disaster we l fare information, mental health assistance and a transition from pre disaster response to post disaster r ecovery. The ARC is chartered by federal law to provide peacetime disaster relief and a s such has been desi gnated the lead agency for ESF 6. To provide emergency mass care the ARC cooperates with state and local governments and agencies. Policies Provisions for mass care will be act i vated when deemed necessary by M DEM M DEM will make determ inations as to which populations need to be evac u ated. M DEM will work in conjunction with ESF 6 to determine suitable eva cuation centers and timeframes. Requests for mass care services will be directed to the EOC Human Services Branch Director and ESF 6. E SF 6 will work with all o ther ESFs who have responsibilities related to and affecting mass care. The mass care resources of ESF 6 may be utilized during times when the Miami Dade EOC act i vates at a Level II or I in response to any major eme r gency or disas ter. The available resources of ESF 6 include personnel, facilities, equipment, vehicles, and supplies. The obtainable resources of ESF 6 are personnel, equipment, vehicles, and supplies of related age ncies, Federal, State and local governments, public and private o r gani zations. PART 2 Concept of Operations General In the event of an impending or actual disaster, the agencies and organizations of ESF 6 will assign de signated personnel to the Miami Dade EOC as outlined in the EOC Table of Operations. Shoul d activation be required, the Human Services Branch Director will notify all ESF 6 agencies of an incident and provide them with the time and location their personnel will need to report. ESF 6 shall review developing problems, prioritize, and develop plan s to mitigate incidents or co n cerns. These plans will be forwarded to the EOC Human Services Branch Director. Organization ESF 6 operates within the EOC Human Services Branch. Direction and Control The establishment of priorities and the initiation of eme rgency work for mass care during the r e sponse and recovery phases will be handled by ESF 6. The procedures for receiving, evaluating, prioritizing and dispatc hing mass care resource r e quests are as follows: 1. The EOC Human Services Branch Director receives the resource request.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 127 of 237 2. The EOC Human Services Branch Director provides the r e quests to ESF 6 for evaluation. 3. ESF 6 will prioritize requests based upon u r gency and available resources. 4. ESF 6 will then advises in writing, an estimated completion time and provide this to the EOC Human Se rvices Branch Director. 5. If the resource request exceeds obtainable resources, a request is made to the ESF 7 (Resource Su p port ) Each agency under ESF 6 shall maintain an inventory of available and obtainable resources inc lu d ing vehicles, equipment, mat e rial, and personnel. Each ESF 6 agency will be responsible for the positioning, logistics, and management of its individual resource i n ventory. The American Red Cross is the lead agency for ESF 6 in charge of all shelterin g operations and eva cu a tion centers for general populations in Miami Dade County. Miami Dade Emergency Management and the Miami Dade County Health Department are the lead agencies responsible for the operations of Medical Evacuation Ce n ters. The America n Red Cross is responsible for the establishment of mass feeding operations in Miami Dade County. To supplement their resources, MD VOAD agencies will be called upon to provide assi stance and support. During non hurricane conditions, calling 911 can render emergency medical se r vices. The American Red Cross may or may not have personnel or volunteers who are qualified to provide first aid services. Local paramedics will be provided to evacuation centers and feeding sites and emergency st a tions may request p aramedics. The American Red Cross will maintain a registry of all people who are in evacuation centers. The M iami Dade County Health Department will provide information on the people who are in Medical E vacu ation Centers. This information will be compil ed and utilized by the American Red Cross Disaster We lfare Inquiry, a program developed to help family members and friends locate one anot h er. The sites that have been selected as hurr i cane evacuation centers are school board facilities and have backup gen erators for emergency lighting. Medical Management Facilities are utilized for the placement of the electrically dependent and have backup generators with specially designated ou t lets. Evacuation centers will be opened when an emergency situation requires the evacuation and shelte r ing of people. M DEM coordinates the opening and closing of centers with all involved agencies. Evacu ation c enters are closed when it is determined that they are no longer needed or alternative arrang ements have been made for pe rsons who are unable to return to their homes. The American Red Cross is responsible for the registration, staffing, feeding and other activities in the general population evacuation centers. M DEM has recruited county personnel for the manag e ment and regi stration positions and providing logistical support for Medical E vacuation Centers Miami Dade County Health Department and Jackson Memorial Hospital are responsible for coordina t ing the medical personnel and supplementing other personnel as needed at the Medical E vacuation Centers The American Red Cross will supply support for food and water supplies after the initial two day supply at each Medical Evacuation Center has been utilized. More detailed information regarding the operations

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 128 of 237 of the Medical E v acuation Centers can be found in the Miami Dade County Emergency Evacuation A ssistance Pr o gram. Municipal police, M i ami Dade County School Board Police, and contracted county security agencies will provide security. Miami Dade Police is the lead agency fo r coordinating security at each loc a tion. The American Red Cross is responsible for training the management personnel for the general evacu ation centers run by the American Red Cross. M DEM provides training for the management personnel for the Medical E va cuation Centers Each evacuation center has a two day supply of USDA bulk food stored in its facility for use during hu rricane evacuations. Miami Dade County School Board cafeteria and custodial personnel will be on hand to provide cooking and cleaning se rvices. The American Red Cross will be responsible for coord inating feeding and sanitation functions at the location they are operating. Communication Systems Evacuation centers are equipped with phone and fax capability. Ham radio operators will report to each eva cuation center with their communication equipment at the designated time. ESF 6 Interface ESF 6 will coordinate directly with other Human Service age n cies for support services. ESF 6 will coordinate through the EOC Human Services Branch Director for support from other ESFs ou t side of the EOC Human Services Branch. ESF 6 will exhaust all obtainable resources before turning a request for logistical support over to ESF 7 (Resource Support ). The American Red Cross will coordinate with ESF 11 ( Food an d Water ) and ESF 7 (Resources Su pport ) to make provisions for resources of food, water, and ice to be distributed from mass feeding sites. Responsibilities ESF 6 is responsible for the planning and pr o vision of mass care services. ESF 6 is responsible for coordinating the availability and participation of designated individuals within the support team as needed. The lead and support agencies will work with the EOC Human Services Branch Director to update the a p propriate sections of the Miami Dade CEMP as n eeded. The EOC Human Services Branch Director will coordinate with the lead and support agencies to mai ntain an emergency co n tact list. Each ESF 6 lead and support agency will be required to establish and maintain a database of avail a ble resources that may require for a disaster. The overall administration and coordina tion of mass care include collaboration between the EOC H uman Services Branch Director and the ESF 6 agencies and organizations. ESF 6 personnel designated to report to the EOC will have the d elegated authority of their agency to commit available resources and procure obtainable r e sources as needed. Preparation During the preliminary phases prior to a disaster, the following tasks must be acco m plished:

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 129 of 237 1. Contact the designated ESF 6 lead and su p port personnel. 2. Determine the scope of services that will be required from ESF 6. 3. Develop and maintain a master list of the status of the evacuation centers and ensure this i n formation is disseminated to the appr o priate agencies. 4. Arrange for 24 hour (or appropriate) coverage within the EOC and other designated sites where mass care services are provided. The personnel required to provide this coverage will be obtained from a roster of American Red Cross volu n teers, support agencies, and VOAD. 5. The ESF 6 l ead agency will establish comm u nications with State ESF 6 contact. 6. Assess the projection for provision of services and perform a preliminary vulnerability evalu a tion based upon predicted conditions 7. Confirm operation of all notification and co m munication systems. Response The response phase of an incident or disaster requires that a number of tasks be accomplished by ESF 6. The following represents a list of those b a sic response actions: 1. Evaluate the status and conditions of the evacuation centers to det ermine which centers should remain open. 2. Based on information received from the Damage Assessment Teams, determine if additional mass care services are needed and in which areas 3. Receive, distribute, evaluate and act on resource requests for ESF 6 respo nders from outside the county. 4. Make arrangements to include sleeping a c commodations. 5. List items for inclusion of the situation reports and action plans. 6. Collect data and prepare reports as dete r mined by the EOC Operations Section Chief. Recovery The rec overy phase of an incident or disaster places an entirely new set of duties and responsibil i ties upon ESF 6. The following represents a list of those basic recovery a c tions: 1. Monitor the conditions of evacuees and responders and provide needed services inc luding food and w a ter at evacuation centers, and disaster relief centers on a priority basis. 2. Receive, distribute, evaluate and act on resource requests for the impacted a r eas. 3. List items for inclusion in briefings and action plans.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 130 of 237 4. Establish system fo r the utilization of mutual aid resources and personnel. 5. Continue to produce situation reports for H u man Services Branch Director as planned. 6. Assure adequate coverage for each shift. Non emergency Activities During non emergency times ESF 6 agencies, in conjunction with M DEM will plan for, exercise and revise mass care functions. Activities will include: 1. Identifying, measuring, and contracting for appropriate facilities to be used as evacuation centers for a variety of disa s ters. 2. Recruit, screen, and train volunteers to provide essential services within evacuation ce n ters. 3. Coordinate with M DEM to revise and i m prove existing mass care plans. 4. Coordinate with adjacent counties in terms of planning for hosting other counties when the need arises. EMERGE NCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 7 ( RESOURCE SUPPORT ) PART 1 General Introduction The main function of Emergency Support Function 7, Resource Support is to provide logistical su p port for the Miami Dade Emergency Opera tions Center (EOC) through the acquisition of r esources such as materials, equipment, and facilities any time that the EOC is activated. Lead Agency Miami Dade Internal Services Department ( I S D ) Support Agencies County : Disaster Assistance Employee Program (DAE) State : Florida National Guard Florida Division of Community Affairs Federal : United States Department of Defense Federal Emergency Management Agency

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 131 of 237 Private : Miami Dade Voluntary Organizations Active in Di s aster (MDVOAD) United Way of Miami Scope ESF 7 will activate when the Miami Dade EOC is operating at an activation Level II or greater in r e sponse to any major emergency or disaster. ESF 7 agencies will support emergency operations by supplementing the available and obtainable resources of response and recovery agencies. Available or exi sting resources refer to personnel, technology, equipment, supplies, facilities, and vehicles. Obtainable resources refer to perso nnel, technology, equipment, supplies, facilities, and vehicles that can be directly accessed through contractors, vendors, o ther agencies, governments and/or pu b lic or private groups. Emergency response agencies must be prepared to sustain themselves during the first 24 hours following the onset of an eme r gency or disaster. Purpose ESF 7 will provide logistical support to the operations of agencies and personnel at the Miami Dade EOC. ESF 7 ensures that the needs of emergency responders and residents are prioritized so that additional r e sources can be located, secured, distributed, and utilized in the most effective manner poss ible during r e sponse and recovery oper a tions. Policies ESF 7 will activate as members of the resource support team and will operate according to the following guid elines: 1. Anticipate needs that will go beyond local resource capabilities by reviewing curre nt inventory lists to e stablish those items that must be obtained from comme r cial sources. 2. Compile local resource lists and establish agreements and contracts prior to the onset of an emerge n cy. 3. Assign the highest priority in resource alloc a tion decision making to meet the survival needs of disaster victims. 4. Assess and prioritize disaster related needs on an ongoing basis to ensure the most efficient use of r esources. 5. Obtain resources through one of several means, including local resource inventories or local agre e ments, donations, mutual aid (local or statewide), or procur e ment. 6. Provide appropriate staging areas for the receipt, inventory, and organization of bulk r e sources. 7. Identify and operate facilities for the purpose of receiving and storing r e so urces. 8. Identify and operate facilities that will operate as distribution points. 9. Identify and operate facilities that will operate as volunteer reception centers.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 132 of 237 10. Identify and operate facilities that will operate as base camps. 11. Coordinate effective tra nsportation of r e sources to their destinations. 12. Track resources from time of deployment to time of demobilization. PART 2 Concept of Operations General ESF 7 will provide support to the Operations of the EOC during all phases of an emergency activ a tio n. Organization Resource Support is an emergency support function within the EOC Logistics Section. In add i tion to the lead agency for an emergency support function, there are several support agencies. The agencies that comprise ESF 7 report directly to t he EOC Logistics Section Chief. The Miami Dade Internal Services Department ( ISD ), as the lead agency for ESF 7, is responsible for the overall operation of the resource su p port function. Other identified support agencies are tasked with specific roles in support of ESF 7 based on their areas of expe r tise. ESF 7 support agencies must appoint representatives who have the authority to commit and procure avai l able and obtainable resources without requiring additional agency approval. These re p resentatives mu st also have the authority to make decisions on behalf of their respective agencies. Direction and Control The EOC Logistics Section Chief and the lead agency will work cooperatively in creating and maintai ning a database of names and numbers to be utilize d for emergency contacts. The EOC Logistics Section Chief will be responsible for notifying the ESF 7 lead agency represent a tive of any pending incident or emergency. If appropriate, the lead agency representative will alert the su pport agencies of the po tential for an EOC activation. If prior warning is available, the lead agency and appropriate support agency representatives will alert those suppliers with whom agreements or contracts are currently in place. Preparation During the preliminary phases prio r to the onset of an emergency or disaster, a number of preparatory tasks must be acco m plished. These are: 1. Contact entities with which contracts, agreements or arrangements have been made for providing r esources during emergencies or di s asters. 2. Identify warehouses and properties that can be used for staging areas for inco m ing resources, resource distribution points, base camps, volunteer reception centers, warehouses, and other functions as they arise.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 133 of 237 3. Compile resource lists from EOC represent a tive agenc ies. 4. Perform a preliminary needs assessment based upon predicted conditions and prior exper i ence. 5. Receive resource requests for the Disaster Assistance Centers (DACs). 6. Ensure that agency representatives have access to forms and systems for tracking r e s ources once they are deployed. *All agencies and departments that are located within the EOC or who are designated as support agencies for any Miami Dade County ESF are responsible for keeping their own available resource lists. Agencies should have this resource information readily available during the prepar a tion stage. Response Once ESF 7 has been activated, it will carry out resource support response activities by addressing the follo wing concerns: 1. Needs assessment 2. Resource location and acquisition 3. Distribution of resources 4. Tracking of resources Recovery Once the emergency situation subsides and crit i cal needs have been met, the EOC Logistics Section Chief and ESF 7 lead agency representative will direct the Needs Assessment, Supply and Distr i bution Groups to complete the following activ i ties: Conduct a call down of last known on site contacts for each resource that has been deployed to ver i fy its present status and location. Contact all recipients of loaned equipment, supplies, or personnel and ver ify arrang e ments for return of items. Arrange for disposal, relocation, or sto r age of excess donations and supplies. Close facilities after verifying that all of the necessary paperwork has been co m pleted. Deactivate volunteers and staff. Continue to c ompile and prepare documentation relevant to any resources received through procur ement or the Statewide M u tual Aid Agreement. Determine if any donors or suppliers are willing to enter into agreements for future emergencies.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 134 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 8 ( HEALTH AND MEDICAL ) PART 1 General Introduction Emergency Support Function 8 deals with the issue of providing health and medical care during the r e sponse and recovery phases of a disaster. Lead Agency Miami Dade County Health Department Support Agenci es County : Miami Dade Fire Rescue Miami Dade Medical Examiners Department Miami Dade Emergency Management Miami Dade Internal Services Department Miami Dade Police Department Municipal Fire Rescue Departments Municipal P o lice Departments Public Health Trust State : Agency for Health Care Administration Department of Children and Families (DCF) Disaster Medical Assistance Teams Florida Department of Elder Affairs Private : American Red Cross South Florida Region Florida Health Care Association South Florida Hospital & Healthcare Ass o ciation Miami Dade Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters Scope The ESF 8 lead and support agencies will become operational when the Miami Dade EOC activates at a Level II, or I in response to any major emergency or disaster. Due to the large scope of work involved with ESF 8 activities, Environmental and Public Health will r espond to environmental and public issues. For a detailed description of these activities, please refer to the E S F 8 SOP l o cated in Volume II of this CEMP.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 135 of 237 Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 8 to plan for, mobilize, and manage health and medical services during the r esponse and recovery phases of a disaster. ESF 8 will provide medical care, treatment, and support to disaster victims, respons e perso n nel, and the general public. ESF 8 activities include evacuation of the injured, disposition of the dead, medical and special needs evacu ations, and basic health considerations. These activities will be coordinated through the EOC Human Services Branch Director. The Miami Dade Health Department has been tasked as lead agency for ESF 8. Policies ESF 8 will be responsible for coo r dinating the evacuation of stretcher bound patients from hospitals and nursing homes, if an evacuation becomes necessary M DE M will coordinate with private and public ambulance, where M DEM will prioritize and dispatch evacuating facilities. The Miami Dade Police D epartment Motorcycle Officers will be responsible for escorting the ambulances evacuating from hospitals and n ur s ing homes. ESF 8 will also monitor the overall evacuation of residential health care facilities and identifying those facilities that need resources for recovery from an emergency or disaster. The DCF Crisis Response Team (CRT) was developed to respond to the emotional and behavioral r ea c tions that may affect the population of Miami Dade County after such event. The CRT will have the capacity to respond to this need in a coordinated and efficient manner. The CRT also provides a c apacity to compliment and augment existing intervention and referral services to victims of critical inc idents and disasters on both a regional and statewide level. In incidents that do not require the opening of a Medical E vacuation Centers or DAC s CRT will provide counsel ing services to disaster victims as determined necessary by the MDCRT assessment teams. CRT has established criteria to certify volu nteer mental health counselors. These criteria are outlined in the CRT plan. Emergency response personnel will receive cou nseling services through the Critical Incident Stress D ebriefing (CISD) that is provided to its employees by the responding agency. Those agencies that have not implemented a CISD program may receive counseling services from the CRT. It will be the respon sibility of the ESF 8 to review and assess health and medical needs in the county in the event of an emergency or di s aster. After assessing the needs of the county, ESF 8 will make preparations to obtain resources to meet those needs. A response and short term recovery action plan will be submitted to the EOC Human Se rvices Branch Director. ESF 8 will coordinate issues that go beyond medical intervention such as radi ological, epidemiological, environmental health, communicable disease, hazardous material c ontamin ation and vector co n trol. Resource support requests will be submitted through the EOC Human Services Branch Director whom will then task ESF 8 agencies to provide the resource. If the resource is not available or obtainable through ESF 8, the EOC H uman Services Branch Director will submit a request to ESF 7 (Resource Support ). Dade Police Department Homicide on the cause of death and identification of victims; with Funeral Directors on mortuary services and also

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 136 of 237 identification of victims; and with the CRT on the next of kin notification. MDPD Homicide will be the l iaison for the Medical Examiner at the Miami Dade Emergency Operations Center. The Medical Exa mped a mass casualty plan outlining this coordin a tion. ESF 8 in cooperation with Environmental and Public Health will be responsible for the identification of contaminated foodstuffs. Miami Dade Solid Waste Management, as a support agency of Enviro n mental a nd Public Health will arrange for the collection and disposal of any contaminated foodstuffs identified. PART 2 Concept of Operations General Each ESF 8 agency is responsible for identifying personnel that will be assigned to the EOC, evacu a tion centers and disaster relief centers. Coordinate the setup, maintenance, and demobilization of Medical Evacuation Centers ( M ECs), to i nclude staffing (medical and administrative), shelter inventory supply, and other onsite response fun ctions. Refer to the Medical Eva c uation Center ( M EC) standard operating procedure for details. Provide nursing staff / personnel at Hurricane Evacuation Centers (HECs). Provide Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteers in order to augment evacuation center staffing and support other medi cal response needs. MRC volunteers will be supplemental and not considered core staff at evacuation ce n ters. Emergency response measures may be exclusively dependent on local resources during the first 24 hours after an emergency or disaster. Preparation s will be made by each ESF 8 agency to provide their own resources for this time period. ESF 8 will prepare an initial inventory of available and obtainable resources for the purpose of determi ning where additional resources will be necessary. The availabl e resources of ESF 8 will include personnel, technology, facilities, medical equipment, veh icles and su p plies. The obtainable resources of ESF 8 are personnel, technology, facilities, equipment, vehicles, and su pplies that can be accessed directly through contractors, vendors, other agencies, governments and/or public and pr i vate groups. In the event of an incident or disaster the EOC Human Services Branch Director will notify all ESF 8 agencies and advise them of when and where their designated personnel a re to report for duty should activation be r e quired.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 137 of 237 Organization ESF 8 operates as a part of the EOC Human Services Branch under the EOC Operations Section Chief. The EOC Human Services Branch Director and ESF 8 agencies will review and update this se ction of the M i ami Dade CEMP on an annual basis. ESF 8 will develop and maintain a dat a base of emergency contacts. Each ESF 8 agency will establish and maintain a database of available and obtainable resources that may be required in a disaster. Designated ESF 8 personnel represented in the EOC must have the authority of their individual age ncies to commit available and obtainable resources without having to secure approval from any other management level. Direction and Control The procedures for receiving, evaluating, prioritizing, and dispatching health and medical resource r e quests are as follows: 1. The EOC Human Services Branch Director receives the request from one of the EOC Operations Chiefs or a support Se c tion Chief. 2. The EOC Human Services Branch Di rector disburses the request to ESF 8 for evaluation and prioritiz ation. 3. ESF 8 will prioritize the request urgency and avai l able resources. 4. ESF 8 will advise in writing an estimated completion time and submit to the EOC Human Services Branch Director. 5. I f the resource request exceeds obtainable resources, ESF 8 will attempt to locate the resource through outside sources. 6. A request will then be made to ESF 7 (R e source Support ) Preparation During the preliminary phases prior to an incident or disaster, t he following tasks must be acco m plished: 1. ESF 8 agencies will designate perso n nel to insure 24 hour continuity of operation in the Miami Dade EOC and in the field. 2. Coordinate with the Special Needs Coordinator in obtaining the list of PSNs that require amb ulance tran sportation. 3. The ESF 8 lead agency will establish contact with the State ESF 8 contact. 4. Perform a preliminary vulnerability evaluation based upon predicted cond i tions. 5. Confirm operation of all notification sy s tems.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 138 of 237 Response The response phase of an incident or disaster requires that a number of tasks be accomplished by ESF 8. The following represents a list of those b a sic response actions: 1. Obtain accurate census for health care facilities and EEAP clients t hat require evacuation by amb u lance. 2. Coor dinate the evacuation of health care facilities with support from local and municipal fire rescue and private ambulance companies Direct private ambulance companies in the evacuation of stretcher bound patients through the Evacuation Support Center. 3. Coor dinate the ambulance evacuation of EEAP clients with municipal fire rescue d e partments. 4. Maintain contact with the State ESF 8 contact. Determine whether to request an activation of the Di s aster Medical Assistance Teams (DMAT). 5. Collect data and prepare rep orts as dete r mined by the EOC Operations Section Chief. 6. List items for inclusion in the situation reports and action plans. Recovery The recovery phase of an incident or disaster places an entirely new set of duties and responsibil i ties upon ESF 8. The fol lowing represents a list of those basic recovery a c tions: 1. Ensure that the appropriate actions are taken to protect the health and safety of disaster victims, respon ders, and the general public. 2. If area medical facilities are damaged, make preparations to transport victims in serious or critical cond ition to facilities outside the disaster area. 3. Coordinate the re entry of hospitals and EEAP clients 4. If necessary, set up casualty collection points. 5. Monitor and report any potential or exis t ing health conc erns. 6. Disseminate information to the public concer n ing potential and existing health hazards. 7. Identify mental health needs of those affected by or responding to the disaster. Assign mental health workers when deemed necessary by the CRT. 8. Coordinate wi th the Miami Dade Police Department Homicide or Medical Examiner Depar t ment for the notification of next of kin. 9. Assure adequate coverage of EOC represe n tatives for each shift.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 139 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNC TION 9 ( URBAN SEARCH AND RE S CUE ) PART 1 General Intr oduction Emergency Support Function 9 ( Urban Search & Rescue ) provides for the services of urban search and re scue during the response and recovery phases of a disa s ter. Lead Agency Miami Dade Fire Rescue Support Agencies Miami Dade Medical Examiners Depa rtment Miami Dade Emergency Management Miami Dade Police Department Miami Dade Transit Agency Miami Fire Rescue USAR Task Force 2 Municipal Police Departments State : Civil Air Patrol Florida Department of Insurance Federal : Federal Emergency Managemen t Agency (FEMA) United States Department of Defense Scope The ESF 9 lead and appropriate support agencies will become operational when the Miami Dade Eme r gency Operations Center (EOC ) activates at a Level II, or I in response to any major incident or disas ter. The Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) Task Force is responsible for locating, extricating, and providing immediate med ical treatment for life threatening injuries of victims trapped in collapsed structures, debris fields, excavations sites, maritime inc idents, and/or downed aircraft. This function will be provided within the first 72 hours of the occu r rence of an ev ent. The available and obtainable resources of ESF 9 include personnel, search and rescue specific equi pment, vehicles, and supplies and sea rch dogs. Purpose It is the purpose of ESF 9 to coordinate search and rescue efforts throughout Miami Dade County during the response and immediate r e covery phases of any disaster. The efforts include but are not limited to:

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 140 of 237 1. Conducting physical search and rescue operations in damaged/collapsed structures and transportation accidents to locate and extricate victims. 2. Administering immediate medical attention for life threatening injuries. 3. Carrying out reconnaissance duties to assess damage and de termine needs, then provide that info r mation to all agencies involved, i n cluding SERT or PDA teams. 4. Providing disaster communications support using state of the art satellite systems. 5. Coordinating identification of missing persons with law enforcem ent 7. Performing specialized operations such as diving and technical operations such as confined space, rope, trench, and swift water rescues. 8. Alerting Miami Dade Police and the Medical Examiners staff to deceased victims so they may e x tricate corpses. 9. A ll mutual aid resources should be exhausted first before requesting Federal assistance except if it is clear that the magnitude of the event will require add i tional USAR task forces. PART 2 Concept of Oper a tions General Miami Dade Fire Rescue is the lea d agency for ESF 9. The EOC Public Safety Branch Director will notify ESF 9 primary contact in the event of an inci dent of di s aster ESF 9 shall monitor, prioritize, and develop plans to mitigate any incidents. The ESF 9 representative upon arrival at the EOC will contact his/her state counterpart, relaying the si t uation and giving an assessment of possible support that may be needed from mutual aid and federal sources. Should USAR operations require transportation of task force personnel; ESF 1 will be tas ked to pr o vide it. Organization ESF 9 operates within the EOC Public Safety Branch under the EOC Operations Section Chief. The EOC Public Safety Branch Director is responsible for managing the availability and participation of de s ignated individuals within ESF 9. The ESF 4 representative may support the ESF 9 role should the second MDFR seat require a Hazar dous Materials specialist. The EOC Public Safety Branch Director will review and update this section of the Miami Dade CEM P as needed or annually at a mi nimum. The EOC Public Safety Branch Director will coordinate with the ESF 9 lead agency to maintain an emergency contact list.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 141 of 237 MDFR, as the lead for ESF 9, is required to establish and maintain a database of available r e sources. Designated ESF 9 personnel must have the delegated authority of their agency to commit and pr o cure resources as needed. Direction and Control for Light S earch and R es cue The procedure for receiving, evaluating, prioriti z ing, and dispatching search and rescue resource requests is a s follows: 1. ESF 9 may receive resource requests from the EOC Operations Section Chief, any EOC Branch Dire c tor, or any agency representative in the EOC. 2. ESF 9 prioritizes these resource requests based upon urgency and available resources. 3. ESF 9 will determine if standard Fire Rescue units can be deployed to accomplish the r e quest. 4. If specialized units such as dive teams are required, such requests will be made to the Depar t Fire Operations Center 5. ESF 9 shall keep up to date inv entories of equipment required for search and rescue, including where heavy equipment can be located in the private sector. 6. ESF 9 will annotate, in Web EOC an estimated completion time, a list or necessary resources, and an a p proximate cost. 7. If the Resource request exceeds available resources, a request is made to the EOC Logistical Section to s e cure mutual aid. 8. ESF 9 has direct link communications to the Fire Operations Center 9. It is the responsibility of the EOC Public Safety Branch Director to monitor any and all resource requests aligned with ESF 9 and assure appropr i ate action is taken. 10. ESF 9 will interface with the EOC Public Safety Branch Director to expedite the priorities of the fun c tion. Activation of ESF 9 does not indi cate activation of the Miami Dade USAR Task Force 1, or the City of M i USAR Task Force 2. The personnel and equipment that belong to both Task Forces may be utilized as part of a standard Fire Rescue response. If additional US&R task force support is needed, it shall be requested from FEMA according to the National Response Framework procedures and existing prot o cols.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 142 of 237 Direction and Control for U rban S earch and R escue Florida Task Force 1 (US&R, FL TF 1) USAR requests will be carried out in the foll o w ing manner: 1. ESF 9 receives the deployment request from the EOC Incident Commander or EOC Public Safety Branch D i rector. 2. ESF 9 contacts the Fire Operations Center and relays the information of the location of the co l lapse, the situation report, and any a pplicable support material or personnel available to the USAR Task Force. 3. If resources are not available, ESF9 makes a request to any m u tual aid resources available. 4. The establishment of priorities for search and rescue in the response and immediate reco v ery phase of a disaster will be directed by ESF 9. 5. The Fire Operations C enter makes the determination that resources are available and will gives ESF 9 a projected time of deployment. Medical Facilities : The location and level of devastation of the even t will dictate availability of medical facil i ties. Identification of appropriate facilities or the determination for the need for field hospital operations will be coo rdinated with ESF 8. Location of where to transport survivors will be determined by the Fire Rescue dispatch, based on the o p erational status of medical facilities. Placement of personnel and equipment: US&R operational personnel are active duty Fire Rescue personnel, who are accountable to the Assistant Chief of Fire Operation s The Assis tant Chief of Fire Operations will a ssemble US&R operational personnel if deployment is needed. Their specialized equipment is mai n tained and stored at Fire Rescue Headquarters and can be quickly transported by land or air. An inventory of this equi pment i s maintained and updated weekly by the Office of the Assistant Chief of Fire Operations. The changes to the content of the inventory list are made on a quarterly basis. Communications System: Communications with field units shall be ha n dled by standard dispatch protocols through the Fire Rescue Communications Center. The back up system will be the M i ami Dade Emergency Operations Center (EOC) 911 communications el e ments. Preparation FL TF 1 requirements include monthly inventories of personnel and equip ment in order to maintain read i ness for deployment by FEMA. This pattern is considered sufficient in order to perform any search and rescue fun ctions on the county level. These readiness operations include: Testing of communications and notific a tion e quipment Drilling on mobilization of the Task Force Review of personnel fitness and training r e quirements Review and determination of training for pe r sonnel and service animals annually.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 143 of 237 Response The response phase of an incident or disaster requires that a number of tasks be accomplished by ESF 9. The following represents a list of those basic r e sponse actions: 1. Receive requests for and deploy co l lapsed building search units as needed. 2. Provide verbal or written summaries to SERT and PDA teams concerning st ructural effects of disa s ter on building b e ing searched. 3. Deploy light search and rescue teams in coordination with Fire Rescue or 911 r e quests. 4. ESF 9 Interfacing : Medical: Interface with the ESF 8 (Health and Medical) will ensure that medical concerns or situ a tions are resolved quickly. Infrastructure and Debris Removal: Interface with ESF 3 ( Public Works & Engineering ) will be nece ssary in reaching co l lapsed structures. Fire Fighting: Interface with ESF 4 (Fire f ighting) will be essential to ensure prop er deployment of Fire Rescue equipment and personnel along with requests for mutual aid if firefighting is a factor in the event. Communications: Interface with ESF 2 (Communications) will be essential for solving communic a tion problems should establishe d back up systems malfun c tion. The collapsed building search operations will normally be performed and completed during the ea r liest part of response phase. Light search and rescue may continue but will be performed in line with Fire Rescue oper ations. Recovery The main USAR function is normally completed shortly after the occurrence of an event. The personnel trained for these operations would therefore return to their standard fire department duties and assig n ments. Their recovery functions would the refore be in line with the requests made of the Fire Rescue d e partments. There are no specific recovery phase actions assigned to the pe r sonnel in question. EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 10 ( HAZARDOUS MATER I ALS ) PART 1 GENERAL Introduction The purpose of ESF 10 is to provide support and coordination in response to an actual or potential di s charge or release of hazardous materials resulting from a major emergency or disa s ter. Response Lead Agency Miami Dade Fire Rescue HAZMAT Bureau Recovery Lead Agency Miami Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources ( R ER)

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 144 of 237 Support Agencies Hialeah Fire Rescue HAZMAT team, Miami Fire Rescue HAZMAT team, Florida Department of Environmental Protection United States Coast Guard United States Environmental P rotection Agency Florida Department of Health (state, regional and county offices) Scope The available resources of ESF 10 include personnel, facilities, equipment, vehicles, and su p plies. The obtainable resources of ESF 10 are personnel, equipment, vehic les, and supplies of related agencies, federal, state and local governments, public and private organiz a tions. Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 10 to provide and coordinate hazardous material support during r e sponse and recovery phases of a disa s ter Policies The available and obtainable resources of ESF 10 will be deployed in the event of an incident or disaster to achieve the fo l lowing: Survey impacted areas for releases of hazardous material during the aftermath of disa s ters. Inspect facilities t hat use, manufacture, and/or transport hazardous materials for releases or da m age. Coordinate to contain, isolate, and clean up spills of hazardous materials. Assure that household hazardous materials are being disposed of in an environmentally safe ma n ner PART 2 Concept of Operations General It will be the EOC 10 agencies of an inc ident and provide them with the time and location their personnel should report in case of a required a ctiv a ti on. The ESF 10 lead agency shall review developing problems, prioritize, and develop plans to mitigate i ncidents or concerns. The plans will be forwarded to the EOC Public Safety Branch Director. Miami Dade Fire Rescue, Miami Fire Rescue, and Hialeah Fire Rescue maintain hazardous mater i als response teams for the purpose of providing emergency response to hazardous material inc i dents within the county. The lead and support agencies for ESF 10 provide additional support as required in the r esponse and reco very phases of any hazardous material i n cident or disaster. Organization ESF 10 operates within the EOC Public Safety Branch under the EOC Operations Se c tion Chief.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 145 of 237 The EOC Public Safety Branch Director is responsible for ensuring the availability and par ticipation of designated individuals within the su p port team as needed. In conjunction with the lead agency, the EOC Public Safety Branch Director will update the appropriate se c tions of the Miami Dade CEMP as needed. The EOC Public Safety Branch Director will coordinate with the lead agency to maintain an emergency co n tact list. ESF 10 will be required to establish and maintain a database of available resources that may be r equired for a di s aster. Designated ESF 10 personnel must have the delegated authori ty of the agency to commit and pr o cure resources as needed. D i rection and Control The establishment of priorities and the initiation of emergency work for hazardous material inc i dents during the response and recovery phases are handled by the EOC Public Sa fety Branch Director. The procedures for receiving, evaluating, prioritizing, and responding to resource requests are as fo l lows: 1. ESF 10 receives the resource r e quest from the EOC Public Safety Branch Director. 2. ESF 10 prioritizes based upon urgency an d available r e sources. 3. The ESF 10 lead agency will advise in writing an estimated completion time and provide this to the EOC Public Safety Branch Director. 4. If the resource request exceeds available resources, a request is made to ESF 7 (Resource Su p port ). Each agency under ESF 10 shall maintain an inventory of available and obtainable resources, including veh icles, equipment, material, personnel, and f a cilities. Communication Systems Communications with field units will be achieved via existing radio and tel e phone systems. EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUN C TION 11 ( FOOD & WATER ) P ART 1 General Introduction Emergency Support Function 11 deals with the issue of identifying food, water, and ice needs during the r esponse and recovery phases of a disa s ter. Lead Agency M iami Dade Emergency Management Support Agencies American Red Cross Salvation Army

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 146 of 237 Miami Dade Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster ( MD VOAD) Scope ESF 11 will become operational when the Miami Dade EOC activates at Level II or higher in r e sponse to a major emergency or disaster. The available resources of ESF 11 refer to the personnel, technology, equipment, facilities, goods, and services that belong to the ident i fied ESF 11 lead and support agencies. The obtainable resources ESF 11 r e fer to the personnel, technology, equipment, facilities, goods and services which can be directly accessed by the lead or support agencies through vendors, donors, or e x isting agency agre e ments. ESF 11 will assess the food, water and ice needs of the residents in the affected area following a disa ster or emergency and will obtain the necessary resources. ESF 11 will transport the needed resources to the disaster area with the assistance of ESF 1 (Transpo rtation) and will identify appropriate facilities for storage thr ough the assistance of ESF 7 (Resource Su pport ). ESF 11 will distribute the food, water and ice to the disaster victims in conjunction with the ESF 6 (Mass Care) age n cies. Purpose Emergency Support Function 11 is responsible for providing the immediate f ood, water, and ice needs of the impacted community following an eme r gency or disaster. Policies The representatives from the ESF 11 agencies will be activated as members of the Food and W a ter group in the event of an actual emergency or disaster and will carry out their responsibilities according to the fo l lowing guidelines: 1. A n ticipate the food, water, and ice needs of the impacted areas. 2. Develop and maintain a list of vendors and donors of food and water resources to augment existing inve ntories both f rom within and ou t side of Miami Dade County. 3. Prepare for the receipt of large quantities of food, water, and ice resources by identifying and securing appropriate refri g erated and non refrigerated storage spaces. 4. Provide for the identification of distrib u tion sites for food, water, and ice resources. 5. Provide a contingency plan in the event that contamination of local food and water supplies and/or losses of electrical power prevent the use of existing food and water supplies. 6. Provide timely distribution of essential survival supplies such food, water, and ice to residents of i m pacted areas in conjunction with ESF 1 (Transportation) and ESF 7 ( R esource Support ).

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 147 of 237 7. Liaison with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the American Red Cross (A RC) to possibly augment existing food supplies with their available resources. The (USDA) provides bulk food that is maintained and stored at each of the shelter locations. PART 2 Concept of Operations Organization ESF 11 is an emergency support functio n within the EOC Logistics Section of the Miami Dade Emergency O p erations Center (EOC). The agencies that comprise ESF 11 report directly to the EOC Logistics Section Chief. The lead agency for ESF 11 is responsible for the operation of the food and water function. Other identified support agencies are tasked with specific roles based on their areas of expe r tise. Notification and Alert The EOC Logistics Section Chief and support agenc ies will work cooperatively in creating and maintaining a database of na mes and numbers to be utilized for emergency co n tacts. The EOC Logistics Section Chief will be responsible for notifying the ESF 11 su p port agenc ies representative s of any pending emergency. The lead agency representative will be notified where the suppor t agency perso nnel will need to report in the event that the Miami Dade EOC is a c tivated. The ESF 11 lead agency will proceed to alert the support a gencies of the potential for EOC activ a tion. If prior warning is available, the ESF 11 lead and support age ncies will alert agencies, ve n dors or donors with whom food, water or ice contracts or agre e ments exist. ESF 11 Interface ESF 11 agencies can communicate directly with other ESF agencies within the EOC. Agencies can r e quest assistance and resource suppo rt from each other. Resource Support Interface with ESF 7 (Resource Support ) will be necessary to coordinate the acquisition of food, water, and ice supplies if such items are not available in sufficient quantities within local inventories. The EOC Logis tics Se ction Chief and/or ESF 7 will be the point of contact for making requests from the State of Florida or from fede ral agencies. Mass Care Interface with ESF 6 (Mass Care) will ensure the distribution of food, water, and ice supplies to disaster vict ims through fixed and mobile feeding sites such as Salvation Army Comfort Stations and American Red Cross Emergency Response Veh i cles (ERVs).

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 148 of 237 Transportation Interface with ESF 1 (Transportation) will be necessary to coordinate the transportation of food, w ater, and ice from warehouses and designated staging areas such as the Port of Miami and Miami International Ai r port, into the affected areas. These transportation resources will be provided by ESF 1 on a priority basis. In extreme circumstances, it may b e necessary for ESF 11 to request military assistance through ESF 13 (Military Su pport). Responsibilities In the event of a Level II or I activation of the Miami Dade EOC, the ESF 11 lead agency will advise the desi gnated personnel to report to the EOC. The ESF 11 lead agency in conjunction with the ESF 7 (Resource Support ) lead agency will determine which facilities or food and water staging areas need to be made operational to support the food and water distrib ution. The ESF 11 lead agency will establ ish contact with the ESF 11 representative at the State of Florida EOC (SEOC). Other responsibilities of the ESF 11 lead agency will i n clude: 1. Developing and maintaining a roster of support agencies and their respective disaster coordinator desig nees. 2. Ens uring adequate staffing of the Miami Dade EOC for 24 hour oper a tional period during a Level III or higher activation. 3. Overseeing the implementation of the ESF 11 plan and procedures during times of eme r gency. 4. Involving additional support agencies as the need arises. 5. Receiving status reports from support agencies and providing them to the Logistics Section Chief as r equested. The ESF 11 agencies must designate representatives to support this plan who have the autho r ity to commit agency resources without requiring additional agency approval. These representatives must also have the abi l ity to make decisions on behalf of their respective age n cies.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 149 of 237 Preparation During the preliminary phase prior to the onset of a threatened emergency or disaster, ESF 11 mus t acco mplish a number of prepar a tory tasks: 1. Update food, water, and ice vendor or donor lists. This list should include the loc a tion of the vendor and the product. Contact these entities to verify that necessary items will be available should the disaste r strike. 2. Inventory food, water, and ice su p plies of all ESF 11 agencies and of other vendors within and outside of Miami Dade County. 3. Contact Miami ISD who maintains a list of vendors who have agreed to provide food, w ater and ice to th e County during disasters. 4. Coordinate with the Miami Dade VOAD representative in the EOC in order to contact var i ous private non profit agencies that belong to Miami Dade VOAD who specialize in food warehousing and distrib u tion, e.g. the Daily Bread Food Bank, South Florida Food Recovery, the Salvation Army and the American Red Cross. Many of these agencies belong to their own nationwide network and can activate to supplement local food invent o ries. 5. Coordinate with ESF 7 agencies to identify warehouses which could be used to stage and/or store food, water and ice supplies. 6. Prepare analysis of anticipated food, water and ice needs and begin the process of obtaining these items if not locally avai l able. Response Once the ESF 11 agencies have been acti vated due to the occurrence of an emergency or disa s ter, they will carry out the following responsibil i ties: 1. In coordination with ESF 6, identify the areas and number of individuals in the affected co m munity who are in need of emergency water, food and ic e. 2. Identify and establish mass feeding and food and water distribution sites in coo p eration with ESF 6. 3. Internal Services Department through ESF 7 to purchase as much food, w a ter and ice supplies as possible through both existing and new vendors. 4. Request the Salvation Army (through ESF 6) to establish Comfort Stations in the most a f fected areas in order to provide immediate food and water to the di s aster victims. 5. Solicit bulk donations of food, water and ice, from the public, throug h ESF 15 (Volunteers & Donations) if ne c essary, for those items that have been deemed to be unavailable or in short supply locally.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 150 of 237 6. Coordinate with ESF 16 (Law Enforcement) and ESF 13 (Military Support) to ensure that emergency workers who are providing food, water and ice supplies to disaster victims have access into the affected areas. 7. Request assistance with security at distribution and mass feeding sites to ensure that disaster victims r eceive these resources in an orderly and safe manner. 8. Coordin ate with Environmental and Public Health to determine water contamination and the resultant need for potable water supplies within the affected communities. 9. Monitor the loss of electrical power and determine its impact on food, water and ice needs of disa ster vi ctims. 10. Coordinate with ESF 1 and ESF 7 to secure refrigerated trailers and warehouse space for the distrib u tion and storage of water, ice and food su p plies as necessary. 11. Coordinate with the State and FEMA for the provision of bulk food, water and ice r e sources to augment local resources. 12. In conjunction with ESF 7, ESF 1 (Transport a tion) and ESF 1 3 (Military Support) oversee the routing and distribution of incoming food, water and ice resources. 13. Establish a network of drop off sites surrounding th e affected area both inside and out of Miami Dade County where food products can be left by both individuals and ve n dors. 14. Sort, shrink wrap and palletize the items at the drop off sites. 15. Route trucks to the drop off sites to pick up the items and ship th em to large Distribution Center war ehouses. 16. Inventory and assign the food items to their final destination such as mass feeding sites, DACs, and/or tent Cities within the affected area. 17. Transport the food items to their final destin a tion. 18. Determine thos e food, water and ice shipments that can bypass the drop off sites and Distribution Ce n ter and be routed directly to mass fee d ing sites, DACs and/or Tent Cities. 19. Determine the need for the issuance of emergency food stamps with the Department of Children & Fam ilies (a support agency within ESF 6) and request implementation of the program if deemed appropr i ate. Recovery and Deactivation The recovery phase of an incident or disaster requires additional or varied set of duties and r e sponsibilities for ESF 1 1. The following represents a list of those basic recovery a c tions:

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 151 of 237 1. Assess the need for long term provision of food, water and ice supplies to the disaster vi c tims. 2. Monitor the number and location of community based feeding sites, soup kitc h ens and food p antries and determine their plans for continued feeding for disaster vi c tims. 3. Identify those organizations involved in long term feeding of disa s ter victims. 4. Evaluate the current status of war e house food inventories. Once the emergency situation subside s and critical needs have been met, the Logistics Section Chief in coo peration with the ESF 11 lead agency will determine the feasibility of deactivating. At such time, the following items will be a d dressed and acted upon: 1. Contact all recipients of loane d equipment, supplies or personnel and verify arrang e ments for return of items; 2. Arrange for relocation, preferably to local food warehouses such as the Daily Bread Food Bank, of e x cess food, water, or ice r e sources; 3. Shut down any remaining mass feeding s ites unless operated by an ind e pendent private agency; 4. Evaluate the effectiveness of the ESF 11 operations and prepare a written report of the findings with re commendations for improv e ments; 5. Verify that all donors of food, water and ice supplies receive r vices; 6. Deactivate volunteers and staff of ESF 11 agencies as their services are no longer needed; and 7. Submit all outstanding time sheets and other financial paperwork to the Administration and Finance Se ction. Non Eme rgency Activities The ESF 11 lead agency in cooperation with the EOC Logistics Section Chief is responsible for coordina t ing the attendance and participation of ESF 11 support agencies in planning meetings, conferences, trai n ing and exercises. The lead ag ency representative and EOC Logistics Section Chief will review and revise as necessary the ESF 11 section of the Miami Dade County CEMP and associated S tandard Operating Procedures ESF 11 agencies will recruit a variety of agencies, businesses and organ izations wit h in the local community to enter into agreements regarding the donation or use of supplies, equipment, perso n nel, vehicles or facilities during times of emergency or disaster. Special attention will be given to locating d o nors or vendors of fo od, water, ice and the equipment and supplies necessary to distri b ute these resources.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 152 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 12 ( ENERGY ) PART 1 General Introduction The purpose of ESF 12 is to provide support and coordination of response and recovery efforts for shor t ages and disruptions in the supply and delivery of electricity, natural gas, and other forms of energy and fuel that impact or threaten to impact the victims of a m a jor emergency or disaster. Lead Agency Miami Dade Emergency Management Support Agenci es Florida Department of Transportation Florida Power and Light (FPL) Miami Dade Avi a tion Department Miami Dade Internal Services Depar t ment Miami Dade Regulatory and Economic Resources Department ( R ER) Miami Dade Port Miami NUI City Gas Company of Flor ida Peoples Gas Company Scope The available resources of ESF 12 are defined as personnel, technology, equipment, facilities, and supply r esources. The obtainable resources of ESF 12 are defined as personnel, technology, equipment, facilities, material, a nd supply resources obtainable from contractors, vendors, suppliers, related agencies of federal, state, and local governments, and public and private ass o ciations or groups. Purpose It is the purpose of ESF 12 to coordinate and facilitate all efforts to e nsure the uninterrupted supply and deli very of energy resources to Miami Dade County. This includes minimizing or preventing disruptions in electrical distribution and transmission, fuel supplies, natural gas, or any other form of fuel or energy that may neg a tively impact the county. In addition to the close coordination of available and obtainable resources relative to electrical and gas utilities, ESF 12 is responsible for the coord i nation of fuel supplies for the county. Policies ESF 12 will provide public information bulletins regarding power outages, energy conservation, and ot he r related energy issues, to ESF 14 (Public Information), 311, and ESF 8 ( Health and Medical ) for di ssemination to the media, PSN registry, and for public inqui r ies.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 153 of 237 All inf ormation relative to the situation and status of ESF 12 operations will be provided to the EOC O perations Section Chief via the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. Acquisition of all local fuel resources will be secured by propositioned contracts adminis tered by the ISD Fleet Services Administr a tion Office. PART 2 Concept of Operations General The EOC Infrastructure Branch Director, in cooperation with the ESF 12 lead agency will, in the event of an inc i dent or disaster, assign previously identified per sonnel to the duty roster in the Miami Dade EOC. It will be the responsibility of the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director to notify all ESF 12 support age n cies of any pending incident or disaster and to advise them of when and where their previously design ated pe r sonnel are to report for duty should activation be r e quired. It will be the responsibility of ESF 12 to review and assess developing energy problems and to respond to th ese problems in the following ma n ner: 1. Prepare periodic situation reports and submit to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director on a fr e quency to be determined by the EOC Operations Section Chief. 2. Copy all energy resource requests submitted to ESF 12 to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Dire c tor. Organization ESF 12 operates w ithin the EOC Infrastructure Branch under the administration of the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director and EOC Operations Section Chief. Direction and Control ESF 12 will coordinate and facilitate the restoration of all energy related infrastructure including elec trical transmission and distribution, natural gas storage, distribution, and transportation related fuel. In addition, ESF 12 will coordinate and facilitate the provision of fuel supplies to the county in the quantities necessary to provide support to the r e covery effort. Designated ESF 12 personnel will have the authority to commit available and obtainable resources without having to secure approval from any other level of manag e ment. The procedure for receiving, evaluating, and prioritizing emergency energy resource r e quests is as follows: 1. ESF 12 receives the emergency energy resource request from the EOC Infrastructure Branch Dire c tor. 2. ESF 12 will then prioritize the request based upon comparative urgency and available manpower and equipment. 3. ESF 12 will then advise, in writing, an estimated completion time and submits this information to the Infr astructure Branch Director.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 154 of 237 If the resource request exceeds the available and obtainable resources of ESF 12, the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director will su bmit the request to ESF 7 (Resource Support ) for additional resources. ESF 12 is r esponsible for the positioning, logistics, and management of its individual resource i n ventory. In addition, each agency, when posed with a resource request it cannot fulfil l, will check to see if that resource is available or obtainable from another source before submitting that request to ESF 7 (Resource Su p port ). ESF 12 will work with the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director and the EOC Operations Section Chief in esta blish ing priorities for the restoration of damaged energy supplies based upon the needs of the comm u nity and the severity of the incident or disa s ter. Damage Assessment Interface with Damage Assessment Teams to facilitate the assessment of energy system dama ge, supply d emands, and restoration requir e ments. Procurement Interface with Procurement will facilitate procedures for obtaining and transporting fuel and other emerge n cy supplies. Resource Support Interface with ESF 7 (Resource Support ) will facilita te the acquisition of energy resources on an emergency b a sis. Transportation Interface with ESF 1 (Transportation) will facilitate the need to transport emergency energy r e sources. The ISD Hurricane Preparedness Manual lists the locations all major gov ernment fuel storage facilities within the county, storage capacities, and telephone numbers. Additional emergency fuel deliveries may be reques ted by placing a verbal order with the ISD Fleet Management Administrative Office. ISD will then contact the c urrent contract holder responsible for the type of fuel required and arrange for delivery. The Miami Dade Disaster Fuel Plan details the dissemination of fuel when normal processes have been re n dered ineffective. Responsibilities The EOC Infrastructure Br anch Director is responsible for coordinating the attendance and particip a tion of designated individuals within ESF 12 in meetings, conferences, training sessions, and exe r cises. The ESF 12 support team and the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director will, on a n annual basis, r e view and revise as required, the applicable se c tions of the Miami Dade CEMP. The ESF 12 support team, in conjunction with the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director, will develop and mai n tain a database of emergency contact points. Responsibi lity of the EOC Infrastructure Branch D i rector will include: 1. The establis hment and maintenance of an ESF 12 duty roster insuring 24 hour continuity of oper a tion when required.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 155 of 237 2. The maintenance and timely issuance of situation reports, as appropriate, to t he EOC Operations Se ction Chief. Preparation During the preliminary phases, immed i ately prior to the advent of an incident or potential disaster, a number of preparatory tasks must be accomplished. The following represents a list of those a c tions: 1. Contact designated ESF 12 personnel. 2. Arrange for 24 hour continuity of operation and set up a duty roster and attendance log, as anticipated conditions r e quire. 3. Perform a preliminary vulnerability assessment based upon predicted incident or disaster i m pacts on the energy infrastru c ture. 4. Preposition fuel and transportation resources based upon the preliminary vulnerability asses s ment. 5. Prepare situation reports for submission to the Infrastru c ture Branch Director. 6. Prepare for the response phase. Response The res ponse phase of an incident or disaster requires the coordinated completion of a number of specific a ctions. The following represents a list of those a c tions: 1. Receive, evaluate, coordinate, and implement support and resource requests for ESF 12 a s sistan ce. 2. Continue 24 hour continuity of operation as required, and ensure that sufficient staff is a s signed to the ESF 12 duty roster to maintain operation during the projected operational period. 3. Review preliminary vulnerability evaluations relative to actua l impact and advise the Oper a tions Section Chief of any plan revisions that may be necessary. 4. Prepare situation reports for dissemination to the EOC Operations Section Chief through the EOC Infr astructure Branch Director. 5. Assess recovery phase requiremen ts and i m plement as required. All requests for ESF 12 support and r e sources will be copied to the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. Recovery The following represents a synopsis of the recovery responsibilities of the ESF 12 su p port group. 1. Evaluate the e nergy needs of the county based upon the information gathered during the r e sponse phase and any additional information gathered during the Initial Damage Assessment.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 156 of 237 2. Arrange for the transportation of fuel to meet the emergency needs of the county. ESF 1 (Transport a tion) and ESF 7 (Resource Support ) work closely with ESF 12 on this i s sue. 3. Coordinate with ESF 3 (Public Works and Engineering) for the priority repair of any infrastructure r e quired to facilitate the movement of fuel to meet the emergency need s of the county. 4. Receive, evaluate, coordinate, and implement support and resource requests for ESF 12 a s sistance. 5. Review the staffing needs for 24 hour continuity of operation with the EOC Infrastructure Branch Dire c tor. 6. Plan, coordinate, and implement short term recovery operations relative to the restor a tion of the county electrical distribution system and other energy infrastructure. (Note: The electrical generation, distrib u tion and transmission system in Miami Dade County is a private sector utili ty corporation and is, therefore, i ndependent and separate from any direct state and county assi s tance.) 7. Assess needs and plan for the orderly transfer of operations to the Miami Dade County Division of Reco very and Mitig a tion. The procedures for the asse ssment of energy system damage may be found in the following locations depen ding upon the energy type (i.e. electricity, natural gas or fuel such as diesel and gasoline). Florida Power and Light, as a private corporation is responsible (except for the are a serviced by Homestead Electric), for all da mage assessment and repair issues regarding electrical power generation distribution and transmission. Other than providing and receiving information relative to this issue, the county and its municipalities d o not play an a s sessment or repair role. Similarly, private sector gas companies are responsible for all issues relative to the supply and di s tribution of natural gas within the county. Once again, as a private industry, the responsibility, damage asse ssment and repair of private property is outside the purview of Miami Dade County and its municipalities, other than the supply and r e ceipt of information.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 157 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUN C TION 13 ( MILITARY SUPPORT ) PART 1 GENERAL Introduction Emergency Suppor t Function 13 deals with the issue of providing military support during the response and r e covery phases of a disaster. Lead Agenc y Florida National Guard (FLNG) Support Agenc ies Florida Department of Military Affairs U.S. Department of D e fense Scope ESF 13 will provide coordination between local and county government and the Florida National Guard in a ccordance with the Florida National Guard Operation Plan for Military Su p port to Civil Authorities (FLNG MSCA) ESF 13 will also provide coordination, maps inspectors, and local intelligence to the Damage Assessment Teams in an effort to facilitate disaster impact a s sessments within the county. The Florida National Guard may be act i vated in one of the following ways: A declaration of emergency by the gov e r nor of the State of Florida. A declaration of emergency by the Pres i dent of the United States. A unilateral activation by Local Florida National Guard Commander in response to an immediate and i nent/seri Notification by the Florida Division of Emergency Management that an incident or disaster exists or is imminent that requires the available or obtainable resources of the Florida National Guard (FLNG) The scope of activities in which the FLNG may participate for the purposes of this CEMP is cou n tywide. Purpose ESF 13 will coordinate and facilitate the use of the military resources of the Florida National Guard within M iami Dade County during an incident, di s aster or in times of civil unrest. Due to the specific criteria necessary for the implementation of military assistance within Miami Dade County, this section of the CEMP also delineates the terms and conditions under which the county may r e quest and receive military aid. Policies 1. The Florida N ational Guard will operate in conformance with Chapters 250 & 252 of the Florida Sta t utes and Executive Order 80 29 pursuant to a Declaration of Emergency by the Go v ernor.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 158 of 237 2. In the unlikely event the FLNG operates within the county, in the absence of a Gov ernors Declaration, Section 8B of the Miami Dade County Code would also be in effect. 3. When a Federal Declaration of Emergency is in effect, the FLNG will also operate in confo r mance with: Public Law 100 707 (The Robert T. Stafford Act), 33 USC 701 709a (T he Flood Control Act) and Exec utive Order 12148, 18 USC 1385 (Posse Comitatus Act). Limitations to the provisions of the above may be noted in 44 CFR Section 13. 4. The roles and responsibilities of the FLNG may be employed before, during, or after a declare d incident or disaster and include but are not limited to the follo w ing: Evacuation, transport, and re entry. Emergency infrastructure an d debris clearance. Maintenance of law and order within ce r tain limitations Traffic control. Search and rescue. Medic al treatment of victims. Emergency communications. Logistical support and supply of shelter, food, water, and medical supplies. Provision of potable water. Graves registration (in coordination with the County Medical Exa m iner) Restoration of certain critic al facil i ties. 5. In the event of a Presidential Disaster Declaration, it will be the policy of Miami Dade County not to a l low the use of Federal Military Forces with the follo w ing exception: If the reasonable resources of both the State and County includi ng the Florida National Guard are fully committed and it is palpably clear that the assistance required is beyond the capability of both the county and state, federal troops may be r e quested. 6. The Posse Comitatus Act (18 USC 1385) will be applicable to all military forces deployed to a disaster within Miami Dade County. However, in the event of civil disturbance, the act does not apply to measures construed as protective, as opposed to measures taken which amount to enforc e ment. 7. The authority and jurisdict ion of local gover n ment does not apply in the following area: a) If the president of the United States determines that state and local government is unable to enforce Federal Law he may, at his discretion, utilize Federal Military Forces to enforce those laws. Ref: 10 USC 332 & 3500. 8. Activities performed to protect federal facilities and any other federal property will be performed at the di scretion of the military co m manders.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 159 of 237 9. The use of arms and ammunition by the Florida National Guard is at the sole d iscretion of the G o v er nor and/or FLNG Commanders. PART 2 Concept of Operations General ESF 13 will provide military support to an eme r gency activation when necessary. Organization The Florida National Guard Area Command responsible for planning and execu ting military support mi s sions within Miami Dade County is the 50 th Area Support Group located at Homestead Air R e serve Base. Unless otherwise directed, it will be the responsibility of this group to provide a liaison off i cer to the Miami Dade EOC. Directi on and Control The EOC Incident Com mander, in cooperation with ESF 13, will coordinate through the State Emergency C oCenter ( TAG EOC) for any a c tion involving the Florida Natio nal Guard. The FLNG will provide a liaison officer to the Miami Dade EOC to coordinate all aspects of the mission assignments with the Incident Commander and ESF 13. The Public Safety Branch Director of the Miami Dade EOC will work with them to maintain a database of names and numbers to be utilized for emergency co n tacts. Preparation The County EOC will request National Guard support when necessary. The Governor of the State of Flor i da will mobilize the Florida National Guard upon the iss u ance of an Exec utive Order. Response The FLNGs basic mission assignment will be to provide those resources necessary to support Miami Dade County in areas of need. ESF 13 will convert the request into the form of a mission assignment and forward to the State ESF 13, who in turn, will submit the mission request to TAG EOC for action. In catastrophic disasters, the Governor may, at his/her discretion, request assistance from the Depar tment of Defense. In this instance, the State Adjutant General and/or his designee will p rovide the liaison between State and Federal Mil i tary Force Command. Recovery ESF 13 may be requested to participate in certain emergency activities during the recovery phase of a disa ster, such as logistical operations and restoration of critical infrast ructure.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 160 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 14 ( PUBLIC INFO R MATION ) PART 1 General Introduction The purpose of ESF 14 is to prepare, coordinate, and disseminate information regarding major emerge n cies and disasters to the general public through various forms of media. Lead Agency Miami Dade Emergency Management Office of Communications Support Agencies County : Miami Dade Fire Rescue Department (MDFRPIO) Miami Dade Parks Re c reation & Open Spaces Department PIO Miami Dade Police Department PIO Miami Dade Public Works and Waste Management Department PIO Miami Dade Transit Agency PIO Miami Dade Water and Sewer Depar t ment PIO Community Information and Outreach (311, PIO) Other County PIO (as determined) State : Florida Division of Emergency Management PI O Federal : FEMA Office of Emergency Information and Public A f fairs (FEMA EIPA) Scope ESF 14 will operate in two main functions: 1. Emergency alerts and instructions di s tributed via the Emergency Alert System (EAS) 2. Emergency Information and media a f fairs with the Public Information Officer (PIO) The primary functions of ESF 14 are: Disseminate emergency alerts and instructions through the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and the Cou nation system, Miami Dade Alerts. Coll ect and disseminate emergency public information Warnings and alerts; How individuals can take responsibility for themselves and their families; Actions being taken by response and recovery agencies; and

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 161 of 237 Ongoing news related to the disaster. Coordination of media interface by the Public Information Officer (PIO): Maintain a credible, effective working relationship with the media, ensuring they have access to info rmation; Work and bring together County professionals and elected leadership to communicate accurately the d etails of the emergency. Disseminate public information via Social media outlets. Incorporating the activities of the EOC into appropriate deadlines. Purpose To disseminate immediate emergency inform a tion concerning disasters to the residents of Miami Dade County in order to save lives and reduce property damage. To provide a central point of contact for the media to release accurate information on a timely ma n ner. Policies The Mayor, M DEM Director or designee, the Office of Communication s Director, and the Lead PIO are the only "official" spokespersons for Miami Dade County who are authorized to release info rmation to the media when the EOC is activated. All public information will be coordinated and approved by concerned agencies and d e p artments and released by one of these individuals. The Lead PIO will be responsible for the coordination of all public information. All information will be coordinated and approved by concerned agencies and departments and released by one of these three p ersons. The appropriate officials will approve information requiring the approval of other county d epartments. Access to the EOC Control Room by the news media will not be permitted. However, glass part i tions and audio speakers will allow the media to vi ew and hear the activity in the control room. The media will be a l lowed to view and listen to these activities. All media personnel are required to wear/display official press credentials at all times while in the EOC. Media personnel will have access to the Press Room, Media Workroom, and all public areas of the M iami Dade Fire Rescue Headquarters building during any level of activation. Media access to all other areas of the EOC is strictly prohibited. It is the policy of M DEM that all information pr ovided to the public will be in English, Spanish and Creole and accessible to the handicapped. Brochures will also be produced in Spanish and Haitian Creole. There is TDD service with in 311 and those numbers are attached to press releases and a n nouncement s to the media. Brochures and pre scripted news releases have been developed to target mobile home residents, emphasizing their vulnerability in the advent of a serious storm and the need for their evacu ation.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 162 of 237 PART 2 Concept of Operations General St affing Once the EOC has gone to a 24 hour shift basis, the Director of Communications will establish a personnel roster to cover an alpha/bravo shift fo r mat from among the departmental PIOs. The Director of Communications can assign the following PIO pos itions: Lead PIO: The Lead PIO reports directly to the coordinating EOC press conferences and is a spokesperson for the County. The Lead PIO also ma nages the press room. T he EOC P ublic I nformation and Communications PI O s PIO dire c tor, d irects the actions of subordinate staff in the PIO work room and serves as the primary point of contact for the ESF. The EOC P ublic I nformation and Communications PI O manages the ac tivities within the PIO Wor k room (#169) and coordinates the development of all draft media advisories, media releases and presentation products, and website updates related to the event. The PIO needs to constantly anticipate the info rmation and media rele ases that may be required of the event. GIC PIO: The 311 Liaison provide s information support to 311 and coordinate all web based public i nformation Media Coordinator: The Media Coordinator is responsible for on site media interface; addressing the med EOC P ublic I nformation and Co mmunications PI O The Media Coordinator is assigned to the Media Room. Special Skills PIOs: provide liaison with Spanish and Creole press outlets and handle calls in those languages. Video & Technical Support Coordinator: The Video and Technical Support Coordinator is responsible for video documentation, photographic documentation of the event, and all technical and equipment needs of the media and EOC audiovisual a nd status board display systems. Organization A Joint Information Center (JIC) comprised of federal, state and local partners will be established at an offsite location to be determined Media access to the EOC will be limited to the Press Room, where t hey will be pr ovided with audio and video feeds from the Control Room as well as any other support resource required to get out coverage of the incident in a timely ma n ner. Direction and Control The following steps will be carried out when preparing the re lease of info r mation to the public: 1. PIOs identify and respond to inquiries, 311 analysis or other sources, and will recommend a course of a ction to the EOC P ublic I nformation and Communications PI O

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 163 of 237 2. The EOC P ublic I nformation and Communications PI O draft s a release if needed and seek a p proval from the Lead PIO. 3. The Lead PIO make s a decision about the release of information. This will include recomme n dations to the Director of DEM and Incident Commander about when the information is to be released, who wi ll do it and where. If a press release is to be issued, the Incident Commander will review and approve all media releases prior to release. 4. The Lead PIO provide s primary interface with decision makers and EOC Incident Commander to a p prove release of emer gency information. 5. Once the Incident Commander approves the release, he/she should sign the release and the EOC P ublic I nformation and Communications PI O will execute delivery of the r e lease. Communications Communications is dictated by the severity of an event. The planning assumption is that the media outlets communications systems will be functioning. The primary system is AT&T telephone, with a back up sy s tem of cellular phone communications. A commercial HF radio transmitter and an 800 MHz transmitte r augment the telephone systems and repeaters are located throughout the county. Secondary systems are media ne twork link a hassee. ESF 14 Interface Interface with ESF 14 is accomplished through the appropriate spokespersons for each of the agencies i nvolved in the activation of the EOC. Research of media questions and the efforts to issue emergency info rmation requires the free access of the PIO staff to all EOC agency represent a tives. 311 Interface with 311 identifies areas or issues of concern that need to be addressed, either by action by age ncies or a release of information. The M DEM website http://www.miamidade.gov/oem supplies Miami Dade residents with info r mation on how to prepare for disasters. During EOC activation a representative from C IAO update s the site with emergency public information drawn from media releases, media briefings, damage asses s ment photos, and recovery information. The 311 call takers use the same information to answer cit i zen calls Preparation The PIO function prepare s itself in the follo w ing ways: 1. U pdate s ESF and media contact names and numbers for key personnel every April and October. 2. Test all media message delivery eq uipment the first Friday of every quarter in tandem with the Tu r key Point Siren tests. 3. Test wireless emergency notification system (Miami Dade Alerts) every month. 4. Conduct brief s the media every May to review procedures, and brief the media on Hurricane Pr epa redness Month activities. Evacuation maps, shelter locations, and bus pick up points are provided to the media in formats they can use for broadcast and printing, and then updated as needed. Their broadcast of these materials is the chief format for del ivery of them to residents and vis i tors. 5. Review and re write standardized and pre scripted press releases and EAS messages following act ivation and exe r cises.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 164 of 237 6. Develop and provide evacuation maps listing areas of vulnerability, shelter locations, and bus pi ck up points is provided to the media in formats they can use for broadcast, printing, and updating as nee ded. Their broadcast of these materials will be the chief format for delivery to residents and visitors. 7. AT&T prints the Miami Dade County Evacuation map, and basic preparedness information in the White Pages. These are updated every year with assistance from the American Red Cross 8. Research and test other methods of communicating with the public in absence of standard met h ods. Response The response phase of an incident or disaster requires the coordinated completion of a number of specific a ctions. The fol lowing represents a list of ESF 14 functions: 1. The Lead PIO is responsible for the acquisition of all relevant incident or disaster information f rom Inc i dent Commander. Information obtained from this source is sorted and arranged so as to be relevant for di ssemination to the public at large. 2. Proactive contact with the media anticipating questions about damage a s sessment, and the sheltering of vict ims. 3. The PIO is assigned to have constant contact with or participation in the RIAT, SERT or PDA teams to handle media questions should the media also follow, and to feed information back to the EOC. 4. The Director of Communications review s PIO roste rs from other county departments and r e quest their services to relieve EOC perso n nel. Recovery The recovery phase of an incident or disaster places an entirely new set of duties and responsibil i ties upon ESF 14. Recovery Assistance ESF 14 is tasked with disseminating information regarding basic life support and recovery assistance. If a presidential declaration is involved, ESF 14 and 311 serve s as transitional sources of information until fe d eral agencies have set up their pubic information capabil i ties The following tasks will be completed: ESF 14 compile s contact lists and pertinent information to give to state and federal public information elements in order to expedite their capabilities. ESF 14 interface s with EOC Human Services Branch to set up an information exchange for DACs. The EOC P ublic I nformation and Communications PI O set s up a system for delivery of information as DACs are set up.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 165 of 237 EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 15 ( VOLUNTEERS & D O NATIONS ) PART 1 General Introduction Emergency Suppor t Function 15 coordinates volunteer services and donated goods during a disa s ter. Lead Agency United Way of Miami Support Agencies Miami Dade VOAD Volunteer Florida Scope ESF 15 may become operational when the Miami Dade EOC activates at Level II or great er in r e sponse to a major emergency or disaster. They manage all incoming spontaneous volu n teers and donations as well as requests for volunteers and donations. All personnel, technology, equi p ment, facilities, goods, services, and cash received through do nations from the community will be made available to support the response and recovery efforts of local go vernment and private not for profit age n cies. Purpose It is likely that in the event of a catastrophic disaster, well intentioned unsolicited voluntee rs and donations will arrive in the county. In order to effectively manage the receipt of solicited and unsolicited volunteers and d onated goods, it is necessary to have a coordinating entity to facilitate the receipt of such goods and to coord inate the us e of spontaneous volunteers. In some instances, it may even be necessary to recruit and train vo lunteers from within the county. Policies ESF 15 will be activated in the event of an incident or disaster to accomplish the follo w ing: Provide a central loca tion for the local, state, and federal community to offer donations and services to aid in the relief and recovery e f forts. Serve as an additional source of goods and services to support the response and r e covery efforts of the agencies that are providing services to the impacted comm u nity. Create an organized system for receiving, routing, and dispensing solicited and unsolicited donations of goods and se r vices. Establish and operate a donations phone back, website, and if necessary, volunteers reception c e n ters. Develop and maintain a computer based record keeping system for donations and volunteers.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 166 of 237 PART 2 Concept of Operations General ESF 15 will manage the receipt and deployment of volunteers and donations during an emergency activ a tion. Organization ES F 15 is an emergency support function w ithin the EOC Logistics Section. A gencies that comprise ESF 15 report directly to the EOC Logistics Section Chief. The EOC Logistics Section Chief will coordinate with the state ESF 15 counterpart to provide dire ctions and information for volunteers and drivers bringing don a tions into the county The United Way of Miami i s the lead agenc y for ESF 15 and is responsible for the operations of the activ i ties of the volunteers and donations section to include but not li m ited to: The volunteers and donations phone bank and website; Coordination of solicited and unsolicited volu n teers; Coordination of the receipt and distrib u tion of solicited and unsolicited donated goods Support agencies are tasked with specific role s within ESF 15 based on their areas of expertise. ESF 15 su pport agencies must appoint representatives who can work with the lead agency d e velop ESF 15 plans and who can accept responsibility for implementing the ESF 15 plan during emergencies or disaster s. These re presentatives will have the authority to make decisions on behalf of their respe c tive agencies. Direction and Control The EOC Logistics Section Chief and the ESF 15 lead agency work cooperatively in creating and maintai n ing a database of names and numbers to be utilized for eme r gency contacts. The EOC Logistics Section Chief are responsible for notifying ESF 15 of any pending incident or emerge n cy and the location where the support agency personnel need to report in the event that the ESF 15 plan is act ivated. ESF 15 will ensure that the volunteers and donations phone bank and website is appropriately staffed as well as continue to coordinate with the phone bank staff to ensure the receipt of donated goods and volu n teers are matched with thos e agencies or individuals in need of the assistance. The EOC Logistics Section Chief and the ESF 15 lead agency will determine if the circumstances of the eme rgency necessitate the activation of the volunteers and donations phone bank and will take the ap propriate steps accordingly. ESF 15 will prepare periodic situation reports and submit them to the EOC Logistics Se c tion Chief.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 167 of 237 Preparation During the preliminary phases of an emergency or disaster, ESF 15 lead and support agencies must acco mplish the fo llowing tasks: 1. Gather donations and volunteer resource availability lists from all ESF 15 support age n cies. 2. Receive requests for donations and volunteer through ESF 7 (Resource Support ). 3. Contact entities with which agreements are in place for donations an d/or volunteers to assess their cu r rent availability. 4. Mobilize appropriate personnel to set up the equipment and supplies for the Volu n teers and Donations Phone Bank, website, and volunteer reception center. Response Once activated, ESF 15 will carry out t heir responsibilities as they pertain to the following a r eas: 1. Volunteers and donations phone bank, we b site, and volunteer reception centers. 2. Resource database. 3. Operation of donations warehouses and distr i bution sites. Volunteers and Donations Phone Ban k and Website The phone bank and website are the main vehicles used by ESF 15 to coordinate all incoming offers of dona ted goods and services. The ESF 15 lead agency and Logistics Section Chief will determine if activ a tion of the phone bank equipment, s taff, and toll free telephone number is necessary, along with the we b site. The phone bank is dedicated to receive calls from anyone who wishes to donate a good or service to the disaster relief effort. All calls not pertaining to offers of donated goods or services will be referred appropr i ately. The Volunteers and Donations phone bank administrator, in cooperation with the ESF 15 lead agency, will e n sure that the phone bank becomes operational. He or She will also manage all phone bank functions with t he assistance of both the Donations and Volunteer Coo r dinators. Volunteer operators will staff the phone bank. The number of operators will be determined by the scale of the disaster and by the volume of incoming phone calls. Operation of Donations Wa rehouses and Di s tribution Sites The dona tion warehouse sites are large facilities used to store, inventory, sort, package, and pr e pare for the distribution of large volumes of donated goods. The donation warehouse sites are located near the outskirts of the impacted disaster area(s) but preferably not within the area(s). The intention of this placement is to limit the amount of traffic within the i m pacted area so as to keep the roads clear for emergency vehicles. The donations warehouse sites should be large warehouse facilities with loading docks that have paved par king and turn around areas, security fencing, and are preferably located near a major highway, airport, and seaport or rail line.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 168 of 237 The Distribution Sites are smaller locations strategically located throughout the i m pacted disaster areas. Once packaged, resources are transported from the donations warehouse sites to the distribution sites where the resources are most needed. Once properly packaged and authorized through the Miami Dade EOC, r esources can also be directly transported to distrib u tion sites. Distribution sites are the locations where disaster victims and relief and recovery agencies can pick up needed resources. County or municipal government departments or private disaster reli ef age n cies may operate them in certain instances. The number of sites will vary based on the extent of damage in the i m pacted areas. When operating the phone bank, monitoring the website, managing volunteer reception centers, and overse eing donations wa rehouse sites, the Volunteers and Donations Agency carries out the following fun c tions: 1. Determination of resources and services needed to support the response oper a tions. 2. Categorization of donations and volu n teers. 3. Matching needs with donors. 4. Distribution of goods and volunteers to appr o priate destinations. Determination of resources and services needed to support the relief efforts In consultation with the EOC General Staff, ESF 7 will make the initial identification of resource needs and will establish which needs are of the highest prio r ity. ESF 7 and the General Staff will prioritize the needs of the affected area(s) by evaluating information from a variety of sources. These sources include: damage assessment teams, reports from all other field units (i.e. Police, Fire, FP&L, and disaster response agencies), and reports from the general public r e ceived by 3 11 The ESF 7 and EOC Logistics Section Chief will refer needs that cannot be met through existing l o cal resource inventories to ESF 15, when appr opriate. ESF 15 will receive and evaluate incoming resource requests for possible donation or volunteer su p port. ESF 15 will prioritize incoming requests so that the most vital needs are given primary attention. Needs affecting the life, safety, and healt h of the general public will be given highest prio r ity. Requests without existing donation o f fers will be placed on a Donations List. Volunteer Services Individuals who wish to volunteer their services are encouraged to contact a local disaster relief o rganiz a tion through public information campaigns and by the phone bank operators. The volu n teers and donations phone bank maintains information on all offers of volunteer services in the computer database. ESF 15 will conduct training and orientation pro grams for vo l unteers. Matching needs with donors The volunteers and donations phone bank and website are responsible for matching all resource r equests with donations and volu n teers. The computer database is the primary source of all information regardi ng available donated goods and services.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 169 of 237 Requests without existing donation o f fers will be placed on a Donations List. ESF 15 will prepare and submit to the EOC Logistics Section Chief daily reports of those resource r equests not matched with a d o nor. D istribution of goods and volunteers to appropr i ate destinations Donors of goods and services not assigned a destination for their offer will be asked to provide all the pertinent information regarding their don a tion. ESF 15 may need to coordinate with the state of Florida. The phone bank operators discourage individuals from taking their donations or services to the disa s ter areas. Instead, operators gather information in order to match the donated goods/service with a loc ation where these items are need ed or services requested. In situations where the donation is a high priority item, the potential donor can d e liver the goods to the donations warehouse site for storage or to a distrib u tion site. Goods at the donations warehouse sites are sorted, packag ed, stored, and when appropriate, deli v ered to a designated distribution site as directed by e i ther ESF 15 or ESF 7. Recovery Once the emergency situation subsides and critical needs have been met, ESF 15 complete s the following activ i ties: 1. Deactivatio n of the toll free Volunteers and Donations phone bank and staff and of the website. 2. Coordinate with the 311 and with the Public Information Officer to advise the public to contact specific di saster relief organizations if they wish to make additional don a tions or volunteer. 3. Work with ESF 7 (Resource Support ) to arrange for the relocation of excess donated goods to charit a ble organizations. 4. Prepare comprehensive reports on the amount and type of goods and se r vices donated items utilized and specific info rmation on surplus items. EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 16 ( LAW ENFORC E MENT ) PART 1 General Introduction The purpose of ESF 16 is to provide and coordinate the human, technical, equipment, facility, m a terials, and resources of, or obtainable by, ESF 16 a gencies to support the security needs of municipal, local, state, and federal governments during a major emergency or disaster. ESF 16 is responsible for coordinating traffic, crowd control, shelter security, curfew enforcement, and the pr o tection of crit ical facilities.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 170 of 237 Lead Agency Miami Dade Police Department Support Agencies All municipal and tribal police departments within Miami Dade County Miami Dade Public Schools Police Miami Dade Dept of Corrections and Rehabilitation Florida Department of Law Enf orcement Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Florida Highway Patrol Florida National Guard United States Coast Guard Scope The law enforcement and security resources of the primary and support agencies listed under ESF 16 are ut ilized under any level of activation of the Miami Dade Emergency Oper a tions Center. The available resources of ESF 16 include personnel, facilities, equipment, vehicles, and su p plies. A list of available resources inventory is located at the headquarters of each of the support age n cies. Purpose It is the responsibility of ESF 16 to provide and coordinate the law enforcement and security su p port during response and recovery phases of a disa s ter. Policies The available and obtainable resources of ESF 16 are deployed in the event o f an incident or disaster to achieve the fo l lowing: Maintain law enforcement and security in areas evacuated in the aftermath of di s asters. Providing traffic control as needed in i m pacted areas. Insure that communities have adequate protection prior to re population of a comm u nity. Escort supplies, equipment, and VIPs into i m pacted areas. Patrol areas to enforce local curfews as needed. PART 2 Concept of Operations General As the lead agency for ESF 16, the Miami Dade Police Department will assign desi g nated personnel to the Miami Dade EOC during an incident, emergency, or disaster to coordinate all law enforcement acti vities throug h out the county. The Public Safety Branch Director will notify all ESF 16 support agencies with information regarding the t ime and location to report for act i vation.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 171 of 237 In conjunction with the EOC Public Safety Branch Director, ESF 16 shall r e view, prioritize, and develop plans to mitigate incidents or co n cerns. Organization ESF 16 operates within the EOC Public Safety Branch. Each ESF 16 support agency is required to establish and maintain a database of available resources that may be required for a di s aster. Designated ESF 16 personnel must have the delegated authority of their agency to commit and pr o cure resources as needed or be capable of communicating directly with such person with said a u thority. Direction and Control The procedures for receiving, evaluating, prioritizing, and dispatching law enforcement resource r e quests are as follows: 1. ESF 16 receives the resource r e q uest from the EOC Public Safety Branch Director. 2. ESF 16 prioritizes based upon urgency and available r e sources. 3. The ESF 16 lead agencies will then advise, in writing, an estimated completion time and pr o vide this to the EOC Public Safety Branch Director. 4. I f the resource request exceeds available resources, a request is made to ESF 7 (Resource Support ). ESF 16 shall maintain an inventory of available and obtainable resources, including vehicles, equipment, m aterial, and personnel. Due to the fact that ther e are multiple police departments re p resented under ESF 16, it is difficult to maintain a comprehensive inventory of equipment and manpower available in response to an i ncident or disaster. However, the individual resource inve n tories are available throug h the Offices of the Police Chiefs of each individual police department. Each agency will be responsible for the positioning, logistics, and management of its individual r e source inventory. Communication Systems Law enforcement services r e quested by the public will be communicated through the 911 system. If this system be out of service as a result of the loss of telephone service, officers are posted to patrol affec ted areas. Communications with field units is achieved via existing radio and telephone sy s tems. EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 17 ( ANIMAL PROTE C TION ) PART 1 General Introduction ESF 17 is responsible for the acquisition of resources and the coordination of efforts to ensure the safety and well being of all animals, large or small, domestic or exotic, household or commercial before, during, and after a disaster.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 172 of 237 Lead Agency Miami Dade Animal Services Department Support Agencies Miami Dade Emergency Management Miami Dade Police Department Miami Dade Fire Rescue Miami Dade County Cooperative Exte nsion Se r vice Miami Dade County Health Department Florida SART (State Agriculture Response Team) Miami Metro Zoo Sunshine State Horse Council The American Red Cross The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) Disaster Animal Response Team (DART) Uni ted Animal Nations EARS (Emergency Animal Rescue Service) US Public Health VMAT (Veterinary Medical Assistance Team) ASPCA Scope ESF 17 may become operational during any incident or disaster requiring an EOC activ a tion level of II or above. The available a nd obtainable resources of ESF 17 include personnel, technology, equipment, and su pplies obtainable from contractors, vendors, related agencies of federal, state and local gover n ments, as well as private associ a tions or groups. Purpose ESF 17 is charged wi th providing for the safety, preventing or reducing the suffering, and assuring the care of all animals. This includes household pets, commercial livestock, poultry, fish, exhibition (racing animals), zoo animals and laboratory and research animals. Furt her responsibilities include but are not limited to the follo wing: Food, Water, and Shelter Search and rescue Emergency and non emergency medical care Diagnosis, prevention, and control of disease Elimination of parasitic infestation Control and care of s tray, lost, or abandoned animals Security and quarantine Capture and control of escaped exotic Adoption of abandoned animals Reunification of lost animals to with owners

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 173 of 237 Policies ESF 17 operate s in accordance with the follo w ing guidelines: 1. The Miami Dade Animal Service Depa r tment serving as the lead agency for ESF 17 2. ESF 17 falls within the EOC Human Services Branch and reports to the EOC Human Services Branch D i rector. 3. ESF 17 will coordinate with other ESFs in the provision of goods and se r vices. PART 2 Concept of Operations Organization ESF 17 coordinates its activities through the EOC Human Services Branch Director in the EOC and with State ESF 17 operation. ESF 17 support agencies are tasked with specific roles based on areas of expe r tise. Notificat ion and Alert The EOC Human Services Branch Director and the ESF 17 lead agency will work cooperatively in crea ting and maintaining a database of names and numbers to be utilized for emergency contacts. The EOC Human Services Branch Director will be respon sible for the activation and notification of ESF 17 regarding any pending incident or emergency at the discretion of the EOC Operations Section Ma nager. If prior warning is available, the support agencies will alert their individual suppliers of goods and se rvices of their potential requir e ments. ESF 17 Interface ESF 17 communicates directly with any of the ESFs All requests for resources are submitted through the EOC Human Services Branch Dire c tor. Responsibilities The overall administration of ESF 17 tea m is the responsibility of the ESF 17 lead agency, whose duties will include: Developing and maintaining a roster of support agencies and their respective EOC representatives. Working with support agencies to ensure adequate staff for 24 hour operations at the M i ami Dade EOC. Overseeing the implementation of all a s pects of the ESF 17 plan in times of an emergency. Compiling status reports and providing them to the EOC Human Services Branch Dire c tor. It is the responsibility of the ESF 17 support age n cies t o: Review, assess, and respond to incoming r e source requests received from other ESFs. Assess related ESF 17 problems and d e velop corrective actions. Assist in preparing and submitting periodic situ a tion reports.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 174 of 237 All ESF 17 personnel are given the author ity to commit and procure available and obtainable resources wit hout requiring additional agency approval. These representatives have the authority to make decisions on behalf of their respective age n cies. Preparation During the preliminary phases, prio r to the onset of an incident or disaster, a number of preparatory tasks must be accomplished: 1. Contact suppliers of goods and services to ensure that appropriate arrangements have been made to pr ovide essential resources during and after an incident or di s aster 2. Compile or update a resource list from repr e sentative agencies. 3. Identify shelter locations and private facilities available to house domestic animals du r ing the incident or disaster. 4. Perform a preliminary needs a s sessment. Response Once ESF 17 is a ctivated, the following concerns will be addressed: 1. Needs determination 2. Resource location and acquisition 3. Distribution of Resources Needs Determination Although there is no mechanism to accurately determine the number and types of animals currently loca ted in a Miami Dade County, the animal care resources listed in the Miami Dade Animal Care and Control manual are considered adequ ate to deal with any event The only exception to established procedure is when animals of an exotic nature are encountered. Miami Me tro Zoo staff is responsible for handling and caring for exotic an i mals. ESF 17 will: 1. Anticipate animal needs based upon pr o jected severity of the incident or disaster. 2. Resource requests are prioritized to ensure that each resource request me ets the criteria for action by ESF 17. Resource location and acquisition After needs are identified, the personnel, supplies, equipment, facilities, and technology, required to acco mmodate those needs are located and a c quired. When a resource is determ ined to be unobta inable by ESF 17, the group commun i cate s with other ESFs to locate the resource. If the resource is still determined to be unobtainable, ESF 17 request s the assi s tance of the EOC Logistics Section

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 175 of 237 Distribution of Resources Once a resourc e has been acquired, it is the responsibility of ESF 17 to coordinate the distribution of that r esource in the most efficient and timely manner. In many cases the distribution of a resource requires the a ssistance and cooperation of other ESFs. The distri bution of resources will be accomplished in the following ma n ner: 1. Ensure that the appropriate animal she l ters and facilities are operational. 2. Notify checkpoints and animal facilities of the anticipated arrival time of the r e source. 3. Coordinate with ESF 16 (Law Enforcement) to provide traffic control for routing of resources when r equired. 4. Coordinate with ESF 3 (Public Works and Engineering) to confirm that the anticipated routes are pass a ble. 5. Track each resource from its source to its final destination. Recovery and Deactivation Once the emergency situation subsides and the critical needs have been met, the Public Safety Branch Dire ctor and the ESF 17 lead agency represent a tive coordinate following activities: 1. Contact all recipients of loaned equi p ment a nd supplies and verify that arrangements have been made to return those items. 2. Close animal shelters and facilities as r e quired. 3. Deactivate the volunteer staff as r e quired. 4. o nors and volunteers. Non Emergency Acti vities The EOC Human Services Branch Director is responsible for ensuring the attendance and participation of ESF 17 personnel in planning meetings, trai n ing sessions, and exercises. The ESF 17 lead agency and the EOC Human Services Branch Director will r eview and revise, as nece s sary, the ESF 17 section of the Miami Dade County CEMP and the a s sociated SOP. ESF 17 recruit s a variety of businesses, organizations, and local veterinarians within the local community to enter into agreements regarding the dona tion and use of resources during times of emergency. EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION 18 ( Business & Recovery ) PART 1 General Introduction Recognizing the threat to local economies, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) added an Emergency Suppor t Function to its response and recovery tasks to address the recovery needs of the bus iness community. The State of Florida and Miami Dade County subsequently adopted and named ESF 18 B usiness Recovery

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 176 of 237 Miami Dade Emergency Management Business Recovery program is a public private collaboration to e n sure private sector emergency preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. The goal of this pr o gram is to minimize the number of businesses, especially small businesses, that fail to reopen due to the de arth of acc urate and actionable information, during and following an emergency or disaster event. This will be acco mplished through a partnership with the private sector to encourage, where necessary, private sector emerge ncy preparedness and mitigation. In addition, the exchange of timely information between the private and pu blic sectors (the network) will facilitate emergency management response and recovery and en a ble businesses to make appropriate decisions to sustain continuity of oper a tions. Lea d Agency Miami Dade Emergency Management Support Agencies ESF 18 support agencies are made up of private and public entities that operate within Miami Dade Cou n ty. These organizations collectively are identified as the Business Recovery Working Group. The list Bus i ness Recovery Working Group members is maintained by MDEM and published in the ESF 18 SOP. Scope The emphasis of this program is information sharing with the goal of building a resilient community in M i ami Dade County during and following a n emergency or disaster event. Part of developing a resilient bus i ness community is to ensure that the county provides timely information to the private sector prior to, du r ing, and following a disaster event so that they are equipped with the information necessary to make appropriate bus iness decisions. The information shared will include pre disaster preparedness information to enhance the emergency management and business continuity planning of businesses. Additionally, during a response to a hazard i mpacting the county, businesses will be able to share information about the status of a particular bus iness entity or the general devastation in the comm u nity in which the business is located. Such information may include damage assessments, operational r eports, requests for assistance, etc. This program also d eible for business continuity concerns and is empowered to share info r mation about the recov ery status of their company or agency, inform network pa r ticipants of recovery resources they can provide, and use the network to obtain information co n cerning resource availability. Purpose To ensure the timely dissemination of information to the private sector. To serve as a foundation from which to make sound business related decisions. To serve as a mechanism for ESF 18 for facilitating the information exchange wit h in the network. To list partnering organizations or institutions that provides services to businesses in the areas of private sector emergency planning.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 177 of 237 Policies ESF 18 operates in accordance with the following guidelines: 1. The Office of Economic Development & International Trade serves as the ESF 18 re p resentative during EOC activations. 2. E SF 1 8 falls within the EOC Infrastructure Branch and reports to the EOC Infrastru c ture Branch Director. 3. ESF 1 8 will coordinate with other ESFs in the dissemination of information and the provision of goods and services. PART 2 Concept of Operations Or ganization ESF 1 8 coordinates its activities through the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director in the EOC and with State ESF 1 8 operation. Notification and Alert ESF 1 8 will work directly with the various branch directors or section chiefs. Each branch dire ctor or se c tion chief is responsible for ensuring the accuracy and appropriateness of the info r mation provided to the Business Recovery Liaison. Additionally, ESF 18 may access situation reports from WebEOC. Other sources of info rmation from within the E OC include the Public Information Officer (PIO), the EOC Municipal Branch Director, and the EOC status boards. Therefore, ESF 18 will use voice communications and ele c tronic mail, and other communication technologies to effectively gather and disse m inate timely information to and from the business community. Direction and Control The Business Recovery Program (BRP) is led by a steering committee of public and private program partic ipants. The committee is chaired by a member of MDEM. The Steering Comm ittee sets the priorities and d etermines the course of action for the group while MDEM is responsible for the day to day implementation, c oordination and information sharing of the BRP. Business Recovery is a function of the EOC Infrastructure Branch and falls under the command and control of the EOC Infrastructure Branch Director. Information Gathering and Dissemination One of the major objectives of ESF 18 is to facilitate multi directional communication (b g, b b, g g where b=business and g=governme nt) so that all parties get quick and reliable i n formation. To facilitate this process, ESF an inte r net application, which is the primary means for data coll ection, tracking and exchange of situational information, resource needs, operational status and contact information with the business ne t work participants. The Miami Dade County Comm u nity Information and Outreach Department (311) may also be a conduit fo r information dissemination during activ a tions.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 178 of 237 Resource Support One of the major capabilities of the BCIN system is the ability of users to find and a n nounce the availability of resources. This local resource sharing capability can significantly impro ve the speed in which busines s es and the community can recover because it allows users to have quick access locally to scarce resources and n stead of waiting for needed resources to be transported in from around the world when transportation routes or distribution channels may be i m pacted by the event. Demobilization Prior to deactivating the EOC, the EOC Planning Section Chief, in concert with the EOC Operations Se c tion Chief and the EOC Incident Commander, wil l develop a demobilization plan. The demobilization plan is used by the Ope r ations Section to coordinate a closure schedule for each of the EOC Branches. This plan will be implemented in concert with ESF and resources to be del egated under the supervision of the EOC Infrastru c ture Branch Director. BCIN will remain active and accessible as long as r e quired by the incident.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 179 of 237 E MERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER LOGISTICS PLAN PART 1 General Introduction T he EOC Logistics Section supports the operations of the Miami Dade County Emergency Operations Ce n ter (EOC) by acquiring, deploying, tracking, and demobilizing equi p ment, supplies, and human resources. The EOC Logistics Section is directed by the EOC Logis tics Section Chief and is comprised of four Eme r gency Support Functions (ESFs). These include: ESF 7 ( Resource Support ) ; ESF 11 ( Food and Water ) ; ESF 13 ( Mi l itary Support ) ; and ESF 15 ( Volunteers & Donations ) Lead Agency Miami Dade Emergency Manageme nt Support Agencies Miami Dade Internal Services Department (ISD) Miami Dade Procurement Management Services A Division of ISD (PMS) Florida National Guard Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) United Way of Miami Purpose The Logistics Plan provides an all hazards framework for collaboration among responsible entities and coord ination during emergencies in Miami Dade County. The Logistics Plan describes the general approach of M iami Dade Emergency Management (MDEM) and other entities in coo rdinating the influx of local, regional, state, and out of state resources and commodities that can be expected following a catastrophic incident such as a major hurricane. The Logistics Plan does not replace existing means of acquiring resources. Rather it is meant to augment Plan complies with the requirements of the National Incident Management System (NIMS), and is co n sistent with the National Pr eparedness Goal (N PG ). Scope The EOC Logistics Section provides support to Miami Dade County agencies by acquiring assets, equi p ment, supplies, personnel, and/or identifying the facilities necessary to protect the health, safety, and welfare of vis itors and residents in a countywide incident when the normal means of acquiring resources are inadequate or unavailable. This document will describe the roles, responsibilities, and operations of the EOC Logistics Se ction. It is recognized that during the res ponse to an actual incident, the scope of coordination for logistics may e ncompass other counties; the State of Florida; and the Federal Go v ernment.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 180 of 237 PART 2 Concept of Operations Alert & Notification The EOC Logistics Section Chief will notify lead an d support agencies of an imminent threat of disaster and/or pending EOC activation. It is the responsibility of the primary emergency contact person for each agency to i cation processes and to develop a schedule of personnel to staff the EOC. Each age n cy must identify at least six individuals to represent it. m ployee Volunteer Staging Areas, and Volunteer & Donation s Coordin a tion Centers staff when they are on stand by. Response During an event, EOC section chiefs will advise the EOC Logistics Section Chief of anticipated needs or ope rational adjustments that influence the logistical responsibilities of the EOC coord inated effort. The EOC Logi stics Section will support the response phase of an incident when that incident triggers a deficit in available r esources. Once an agency within Miami Dade County requires a resource to carry out its eme r gency mission that it c annot obtain on its own or Miami Dade County needs to initiate disaster operations in which it does not normally engage, the EOC Logistics Section will be utilized for the acquisition of r e sources. The EOC Logistics Section is primarily responsible for, but not limited to, the following response activities du ring EOC activations: Resource Acquisition Resource Staging Points of Distribution Volunteer Management Fuel Shortage/Prioritization Temporary Housing Warehouse Operations Donation Coordination Reco very When a local state of emergency is declared by the County Mayor, the EOC will initiate response oper a tions to assist communities impacted by the event. As response oper a tions are underway, the EOC will simultaneously begin the planning of recovery ope rations. Planning for recovery during the response phase ensures an effe ctive transition from one phase of emergency operations to another. T he emphasis of local activities shifts from response to relief and short term recovery as the requirements to save lives, protect property, and protect pu blic health and safety diminishes. During this phase the county begins the transition out of EOC oriented oper ations as organizations that are designed to facilitate recovery operations stand up. The county may ultim ately transition to a recovery organization that is not based in the EOC, or may move r e covery functions to specific ssions. Consequently, the EOC ten ds to have a diminishing role in recovery activities as the recovery period progresses.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 181 of 237 Demobilization Demobilization of the EOC Logistics Section may commence once it is determined that the EOC will be dea ctivated. The EOC Logistics Section Chief w ill develop a demobilization plan, which will include a tim e line for deactivation; continuity of resource acquis i tion for continued support of incidents that do not require full scale (Level 1) activation; close out of requests; and return of requested res ources.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 182 of 237 ATTACHMENTS

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 183 of 237 Figure 1 Proposed Population Projections

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 184 of 237 Figure 2 Annual Average Change Population Projections, 2004 to 2030 Miami Dade County by Minor Statistical Area Area 2004 2010 2 010 2015 2015 2020 2020 2025 2025 2030 1.1 650 68 229 0 148 1.2 42 1 2 0 72 1.3 509 382 53 419 817 2.1 1,628 1,327 900 0 1,147 2.2 361 291 358 0 333 2.3 464 409 477 0 567 2.4 401 379 614 200 548 3.1 4,067 3,051 229 0 1,589 3.2 3,002 2,364 343 0 1, 037 4.1 3 32 215 664 1,480 4.2 143 277 821 2,607 2,651 4.3 745 697 1,182 644 822 4.4 43 41 84 64 117 4.5 0 0 0 1 1 4.6 390 408 971 947 707 4.7 1,534 1,580 1,507 730 414 5.1 478 420 455 0 813 5.2 605 656 1,767 1,930 1,315 5.3 411 429 1,043 989 1, 175 5.4 215 162 119 0 642 5.5 776 787 782 1,079 880 5.6 231 226 400 235 241 5.7 250 233 347 48 193 5.8 195 207 573 640 543 6.1 3,848 3,205 1,673 0 1,354 6.2 3,589 2,174 26 0 1,063 7.1 1,082 1,213 3,207 3,451 1,887 7.2 669 741 2,077 2,359 1,450 7. 3 295 350 1,667 2,560 1,868 7.4 2,008 1,993 4,630 7,199 4,515 7.5 852 1,055 3,263 3,884 2,050 7.6 122 160 999 1,670 1,160 Total 29,602 25,317 31,013 32,321 33,598

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 185 of 2 37 Figure 3 Minor Statistical Areas

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 186 of 237 Figure 4 2 010 Demographic and Housing Character i s tics

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 187 of 237

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 188 of 237

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 190 of 237

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 191 of 237 Figure 5 Community Profile Percentage of Population Speaking Language Other Than English United States Florida Miami Dade County Percentage of Population Percentage of Populati on Percentage of Population Population 5 years and over 286,534,051 17,595,413 2,318,022 Speak only English 79.60% 73.10% 27.70% Speak a language other than English 20.40% 26.90% 72.30% Spanish or Spanish Cr eole 12.60% 19.80% 64.20% Other Indo Europea n languages 3.70% 5.20% 6.70% Asian and Pacific Island languages 3.20% 1.50% 0.90% Other languages 0.80% 0.50% 0.50% Miami Dade Florida Average Annual Employment 947,091 7,109,630 N atural Resources & Mining 0.9% 1.2% Construction 3.3% 5.0% Manufacturing 3.7% 4.3% Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 25.7% 21.2% Information 1.8% 1.9% Financial Activities 6.4% 6.6% Professional and Business Services 13.0% 14.8% Education and Hea lth Services 16.0% 22.0% Leisure and Hospitality 11.2% 13.2% Other Services 3.7% 3.3% Public Administration 7.0% 6.6% Unclassified 0.0% 0.0% Average Annual Wage (2010) All Industries $45,653 Construction $45,975 Education & Health Services $44,716 Financial Activities $68,883 Information $70,293 Leisure and Hospitality $25,913 Manufacturing $43,346 Natura l Resources and Mining $24,458 Other Services $28,712 Professional and Business Services $55,611 Public Administration $62,358 Trade, Transportation, and Utilities $41,064 Unclassified $2,526,441 Per Capita Income $22,957

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 192 of 237 Figure 6 Percent Population with Disability United States Florida Miami Dade County Number with Disability Percent Number with D isability Percent Number with Disability Percent Total civilian noninst itutionalized popul ation 36,180,124 12.00% 2,334,400 12.70% 255,790 10.60% Population under 5 years 153,059 0.80% 7,318 0.70% 633 0.40% With a hearing diff iculty 99,611 0.50% 4,680 0 .40% 507 0.30% With a vision difficu l ty 87,500 0.40% 4,323 0.40% 322 0.20% Population 5 to 17 years 2,795,434 5.20% 147,298 5.00% 14,673 3.70% With a hearing diff iculty 351,106 0.70% 17,850 0.60% 2,267 0.60% With a vision difficu l ty 410,255 0.80% 20,61 1 0.70% 2,728 0.70% With a cognitive diff iculty 2,106,617 3.90% 114,131 3.90% 10,856 2.80% With an ambulatory difficulty 359,523 0.70% 19,045 0.70% 2,378 0.60% With a self care diff iculty 473,531 0.90% 24,179 0.80% 2,976 0.80% Population 18 to 64 years 18,984,266 10.00% 1,097,268 9.80% 112,893 7.30% With a hearing diff iculty 3,973,964 2.10% 204,595 1.80% 16,161 1.00% With a vision difficu l ty 3,306,048 1.70% 188,170 1.70% 22,160 1.40% With a cognitive diff iculty 7,751,198 4.10% 445,691 4.00% 52,203 3. 40% With an ambulatory difficulty 9,769,575 5.20% 586,124 5.20% 54,790 3.60% With a self care diff iculty 3,362,401 1.80% 203,747 1.80% 20,571 1.30% With an independent living difficulty 6,521,662 3.40% 390,800 3.50% 43,458 2.80% Population 65 years and over 14,247,365 37.20% 1,082,516 34.50% 127,591 37.50%

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 193 of 237 With a hearing diff iculty 5,877,080 15.40% 445,516 14.20% 38,326 11.30% With a vision difficu l ty 2,735,992 7.10% 204,205 6.50% 31,684 9.30% With a cognitive diff iculty 3,636,464 9.50% 282,748 9.00% 49,910 14.70% With an ambulatory difficulty 9,229,675 24.10% 694,660 22.10% 86,742 25.50% With a self care diff iculty 3,367,442 8.80% 247,268 7.90% 41,229 12.10% With an independent living difficulty 6,277,615 16.40% 460,183 14.70% 68,109 20.00% DISAB ILITY BY SEX Male 17,236,270 11.70% 1,110,224 12.50% 107,563 9.30% Female 18,943,854 12.30% 1,224,176 12.90% 148,227 11.70% DISABILITY BY RACE One Race 35,339,109 12.00% 2,291,951 12.70% N N White alone 27,811,116 12.40% 1,887, 295 13.40% 190,602 10.50% Black or African American alone 5,066,234 13.60% 328,334 11.50% 49,659 11.00% American Indian and Alaska Native alone 392,051 16.00% 9,769 17.40% 333 11.20% Asian alone 913,315 6.30% 26,382 5.80% 2,186 5.50% Native Hawaiian an d Other Pacific I s lander alone 45,282 9.30% 728 7.00% N N Some other race alone 1,111,111 7.50% 39,443 7.80% 8,186 9.80% Two or more races 841,015 11.00% 42,449 11.50% 4,747 15.30% White alone, not Hi spanic or Latino 25,244,493 13.00% 1,567,905 14.60% 4 1,239 11.00% Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 3,983,100 8.20% 384,110 9.40% 166,033 10.50%

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 194 of 237 F igure 7 Average Assessed Values by Municipality MIAMI DADE COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER INFORMATION SERVICES DIVISION JULY 1 20 12 20 12 AVERA GE ASSESSED RESIDENTIAL VALUE BY MUNIC I PALITY (Values are from the 20 12 Preliminary Assessment Roll) MUNICIPALITY PROPERTIES AVG ASSESSED 01 MIAMI 90,724 189,710 02 MIAMI BEACH 47,240 329,780 03 CORAL GABLES 16,404 532,130 04 HIALEAH 48,817 91,4 99 05 MIAMI SPRINGS 3,784 174,612 06 NORTH MIAMI 1 4,242 99,949 07 NORTH MIAMI BEACH 1 1,984 98,962 08 OPA LOCKA 2,616 53,120 09 SOUTH MIAMI 3,644 216,070 10 HOMESTEAD 1 6,413 69,323 11 MIAMI SHORES 3, 681 214,705 12 BAL HARBOUR 3,273 801,622 13 BAY H ARBOR ISLANDS 2, 344 198,722 14 SURFSIDE 3, 273 292,212 15 WEST MIAMI 1, 513 142,665 16 FLORIDA CITY 1,865 43,336 17 BISCAYNE PARK 851 161,137 18 EL PORTAL 692 131,931 19 GOLDEN BEACH 348 1,671,603 20 PINECREST 5,910 547,829 21 INDIAN CREEK 32 9,228,6 99 22 MEDLEY 83 63,395 23 NORTH BAY VILLAGE 3, 659 134,255 24 KEY BISCAYNE 6,893 786,274 25 SWEETWATER 3,001 89,384 26 VIRGINIA GARDENS 5 67 125,358 27 HIALEAH GARDENS 5,604 97,294 28 AVENTURA 23,197 421,382 30 UNINCORPORATED M I AMI DADE 3 10,492 130,8 81 31 SUNNY ISLES BEACH 1 5,829 353,959 32 MIAMI LAKES 8,916 192,319 33 PALMETTO BAY 7,973 276,865 34 MIAMI GARDENS 28,344 77,691 35 DORAL 1 6,673 197,792 36 CUTLER BAY 1 3,775 122,237 COUNTYWIDE 725,303 180,537

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 195 of 237 Figure 8 Map of Populated Coastline

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 196 of 237 Figure 9 Classification of Events INCIDENT MINOR DISASTER MAJOR DISASTER CATASTROPHIC DI SASTER A condition of signif icant peril to the saf ety of persons or property that typically comprises the follo wing attributes: A condition of extreme peril to the safety of persons or property that typically compri ses the following attri butes: An exceptional threat to persons or property that typically compri ses of the following attributes: An extraordinary threat to persons or property that typically compris es of the following attributes: EVENT Usually an is olated event with an ordinary threat to life and property; Usually involving a limited or small population; Usually unpr edictable Usually d emands immed iate action to pr otect life, pr e serve public health o r essential se rvices or protect property; Has a defined geographical a rea. Usually an isola ted event with an significant threat to life and prope rty; Usually involving a limited popul ation; Usually unpr edictable; Usually demands immediate action to protect life, preserve public health or essential services or protect property; Has a defined geographical a rea. Single or multiple event (can have other separate i ncidents associa ted with it); Exceptional threat to life and prope rty; Generally wid espread populat ion and geographic area is affected. Single or multiple event (can have many other separate incidents associated with it); Because of the s eve r ity of the event, some or all, local r esources are unavai lable or overwhelmed; The fulfillment of the esse ntial functions are pr evented; Extraordinary threat to life and property; Widespread popul ation and geographic area is affected. RESPONSE Usually only one to a few local agencies i nvolved; Typically does not exceed the capabilities of the agency(ies) involved; Mutual aid is typically not a pplied; A local eme rgency is not d eclared; The EOC may Usually only a few local agencies i nvolved; Typically does not exceed the cap abilities of the agencies i nvolved; Mutual aid may or may not be a pplied; A lo cal emerge ncy is not declared; The EOC may be activated to a Level II; Resource demand may be beyond local capabilities of the responding organizations or jurisdiction si gnificant mutual aid and support may be needed; Many agencies and jurisdictions are involved multiple layers of government; T he EOC is act ivated to at least a Resource demand greatly exceeds the local capabilities of the responding o rganizations or juri sdiction extensive mutual aid and su pport are needed; Many agencies and jurisdictions are i nvolved mu ltiple la yers of government; The EOC is activated to a Level I to provide centralized overall command and coo r-

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 197 of 237 INCIDENT MINOR DISASTER MAJOR DISASTER CATASTROPHIC DI SASTER RESPONSE (continued) be activated to a Level II; Primary co mmand decisions are made at the scene incident command post(s); Strategy, tactics, and resource assignments are determined on the scene; Usually a fairly short duration measured in hours. Primary command decisions are made at the sc ene incident co mmand post(s) or EOC; Strategy, tactics, and resource a ssignments are d etermined on the scene; Usually a fairly short duration measured in hours to days. Level I to provide centralized overall command and coordination of j urisdictional assets, department, and incident support functions, and in itial recovery coo rdination; Will last a su bstantial period of time (days to weeks ) and local government will dination of jurisdi ctional assets, d epartment, and inc ident support fun ctions, and initial r ecovery coordination; Will last a substantial period o f time (weeks to months) and go vernmental agencies will make disaster declarations. RECOVERY Limited to short term recovery e fforts (i.e., rest oration of vital services and f acilities); Usually one to a few local age ncies involved. Limited to short term r ecovery e fforts (i.e., restor ation of vital se rvices and facil ities); Usually only a few local agencies i nvolved. Involves both short term and long term reco very efforts; Generally all local agencies i nvolved; May require assi stance from state agencies; Ma y require assi stance from federal agencies. Involves both short term and long term recovery efforts; All local agencies involved; Requires assistance from state agencies; Requires assistance from federal age ncies, including imm ediate military i nvolvement. (Updated 2011)

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 198 of 237 Figure 1 0 Miami Dade EOC Activation Levels Level Personnel EOC activation Notifications Sample Events Level III: Monitoring & assessment M DEM Duty Officer; M DEM Director; M DEM Deputy Director; Appropriate coordin ators. Yes, but only for M DEM staff. M DEM functions at near normal operations; may hold periodic planning meetings. M DEM Management Staff State Warning Point Key ESF agencies Limited hazardous mater ials event; Multiple alarm fire; Point Nuclear Power Plant. Level II: Partial ICS Positions: Incident Commander; Operations Chief; Logistics Chief; Planning Chief; Admin/Finance Chief; Branch Directors Key ESF agencies. Yes ICS GIS; Mission Tracking & Message Control Center; The 311;* PI O;* Radio (RACES) communications;* Media Center;* EOC Security.* County Mayor; Chief of Staff ; Municipal Branch Representative; Miami Dade depar tments; State Warning Point; Key agencies. Threatening tropical storm or hurricane; Area flooding; Major urban a viation inc ident; Wildfires; Point Nuclear Power Plant. Level I: Full scale ICS Positions; Municipal Branch Re presentatives; ESF Reps.; State Liaison; Policy Group. Federal Liaisons; Military Support. Ye s 24 Hours GIS; Mission Tracking & Message Control Center; The 311; PIO; Radio (RACES) communications; Media Center; EOC Security. Adjacent county EOCs; State EOC; FEMA; Other appropriate agencies. Hurricane;** Major Turkey Point Nucl ear Power Plant inci dent; Major hazardous materials incident;** Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant; Any event with a federal declaration of emergency or disaster; These positions may be activated at Level 2 but are not mandatory at a Level 2. * Generally any event which requires evacuation and sheltering of a significant portion of Miami Dade County will require a Level 1 activation. Cold weather sheltering or isolated area (high ri se fire) evacuation will probably not prompt a Level 1 activation. (Updated 2 01 2 )

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 199 of 237 Figure 1 1 Inmate Population United States Florida Miami Dade County Numb er Percent Number Percent Number Percent Correctional facil ities for adults 2,263,602 28.3 167,453 39.7 12,127 30.3 Juvenile facilities 151,315 1.9 10,061 2.4 504 1 Figure 12 Transient Population United States Florida Miami Dade County Number Ho meless Persons Per 10,000 Number Homeless Persons Per 10,000 Number Homeless Pe rsons Per 10,000 Homeless 671,859 22 48,069 26 3,879 15.5

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 200 of 237 Figure 1 3 Miami Dade EOC Organizational Chart Updated 20 12

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 201 of 237

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 202 of 237 Figure 1 4 Population Evacuation Estimates (Hurricane) Storm Surge Evacuation Zone Resident Population 2010 Ce n sus Mobile Homes Approximate Visitors Low Season Residents & Mobile Homes Population 2010 Census Residents, Visitors & Mobile Homes Population 2010 Census A 146,375 37,413 47,524 183,788 231,312 B 160,900 (6,415) 25,127 154,485 179,612 C 165,721 (2,028) 1,619 163,693 165,312 Total in A, B & C 472,996 74,270 501,966 576,236 Not in Zo ne 2,023,439 Total in County 2,496,435 Mobile Homes are located in different evacuation zones, however, since they need to evacuate for TS and Hurricane Category 1, They're ad ded to the Zone A.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 203 of 237 Figure 1 5 Miami Dade County Canal Systems

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 204 of 237 Figure 1 6 P opulation Changes in the Turkey Point Emergency Planning Zone

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 205 of 237 Figure 1 7 Description of Evacuation Regions

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 206 of 237 Figure 1 8 Evac uation Clearance Times of 90% of the Affected Popul a tions ( Turkey Point )

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 207 of 237 Figure 1 9 Storm S urge Planning Zones

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 208 of 237 F igure 20 Miami Dade Mobile Home Parks

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 209 of 237 Figure 2 1 Miami Dade Marinas MARINA ADDRESS Able Marine Dockage 2599 NW 37 th Ave. Miami, FL 33142 Action Nay Boat Rentals 100 Sunny Isles Blvd. Miami, FL 33160 Allied Marine Group 2550 Bayshore Drive Miami, FL 33133 Alt Mar Auto Marine Service 10724 SW 190 th Street 33157 Anchor Marine 961 N.W. 7 th Street Miami, FL 331 36 Bal Harbour Club Inc. 10201 Collins Ave. Bal Harbour, FL 33154 Bayhead Marina 500 Sunny Isles Blvd. N. Miami Beach, FL 33022 Bayshore Yacht Tennis Club 7904 West Drive Miami, FL 33141 Bimini Shipping 1201 NW South River Drive Miami, FL 33125 Bi scayne Bay Yacht Club 2540 South Bayshore Dr. Miami, FL 33133 Biscayne National Park 40001 State Road 9336 Black Point Bait & Tackle 24777 S.W. 87 Ave Miami, FL 33032 Bojean Boatyard 3041 N.W. South River Drive Miami, FL 33142 Brickell Biscayne Condo 150 SE 25 th Road Miami, FL 33125 Captain Jauvy Marinas Service 700 NW 7 th Ave. Miami, FL 33136 Captain Roscos Ocean Adventures 4833 Collins Ave. Miami, FL 33140 City of Miami Marina 400 SE 2 nd Ave. Miami, FL 33131 Coastal Towers 400 Kings Point Dri ve Miami, FL 33160 Coconut Grove Sailing Club 2990 South Bayshore Drive Miami, FL 33133 Cocoplum Yacht Club 6001 S. Prado Blvd. Miami, FL 33143 Commodore Plaza Condo Association 2780 NE 183 Street Miami FL 33160 Coral Reef Yacht Club 441 Gondoliere Ave. Coral Gables, FL 33143 Crandon Marina 4000 Crandon Blvd. Key Biscayne, FL 33149 Deering Bay Yacht and Country Club 13610 Deering Bay Drive Miami, FL 33158 Deering Bay Yacht Club 13660 Deering Bay Drive Miami, FL 33158 Dinner Key Marina 3400 Pan American Drive Miami, FL 33133 Florida Yacht Charters and Sales 1290 5 th Street Miami, FL 33139 Four Ambassadors Marina Inc 801 Bayshore Drive Miami, FL 33131 Gables Waterway Executive Center 1390 South Dixie Hwy. 33146 Gables Waterway Towers 90 Edgewater Drive Miami, FL 33133 Gator Racquet Club and Marina 7930 East Drive Miami, FL 33141 Global Marine 2215 N.W. 14 St. Miami, FL 33125 Grove Isle 4 Grove Isle Drive Miami, FL 33133 Grove Key Marina 3385 Pan American Drive Miami FL 33107 Hammock Marine Corp 9610 Old Cutler Road Miami, FL 33156 Haulover Marina 10800 Collins Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33154 Homestead Bayfront Park Marina 9698 SW 328 Street Homestead, FL 33033 Hurricane Cove Marina and Boatyard 1884 NW North River Drive Mi ami, FL 33125 Indian Creek Country Club 50 Indian Creek Island Miami, FL 33154 International Marine Fisheries Company 927 Lincoln Road Miami, FL 33139 Jockey Club Marina 1111 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33181 Key Biscayne Yacht Club 180 Harbor Drive K ey Biscayne, FL 33149 Keystone Harbor Club 13155 Ixora Court Miami, FL 33181 Keystone Point Marina 1950 NE 135 Street North Miami, FL 33181 Lacoloma Marina Inc 243 NW South River Dr. Miami, FL 33128

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 210 of 237 Langers Marine 520 W Avenue Miami, FL 33139 La s Americas Marine Inc 501 NW South River Drive Miami, FL 33136 Marbella Marina 801 Bayshore Drive Box 12 Miami, FL 33131 Marine Stadium Marina 3501 Rickenbacker Cswy. Miami, FL 33149 Matheson Hammock Park Marina 9610 Old Cutler Road Miami, FL 3315 6 Maule Lake Marina 17201 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33160 Merrill Stevens Dry Dock Co P.O. Box 011980 Miami, FL 33101 Miami Beach Marina 1700 Convention Center Drive Miami Beach, FL 33139 Miami Beach Marina 330 Alton Miami, FL 33139 MARINA ADDRESS Miami Dade County Public School 150 West McIntire Street Miami, FL 33149 Miami Outboard Club 1099 MacArthur Causeway Miami, FL 33132 Miami Yacht Club and Apartments 1740 NW North River Dr. Miami, FL 33125 Monty's Marina 2665 S. Bayshore Dr. Suite #200 Miami, FL 33133 National Marine Management 3575 Mystic Pointe Drive Miami, FL 33180 North Bay Landing Marina 7601 E Treasure Drive Miami, FL 33141 North Beach Marina 724 NE 79 th Street Miami, FL 33138 Palm Bay Club and Marina 720 NE 69 St. Mia mi, FL 33138 Pelican Harbor Marina 1275 NE 79 th St. Miami, FL 33138 Poinciana Island Yacht & Racquet Club 350 Poinciana Dr. Miami, FL 33160 Poland Yacht Basin 2190 NW North River Drive Miami, FL 33125 Popeye Marine Corp 830 NW 8 th Street Road Miami FL 33136 Powerhouse Marine 13255 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33181 Quayside Marine 10670 NE Quay Plaza Miami, FL 33138 Reel Deal Yachts 2550 S. Bayshore Drive Miami, FL 33133 Rickenbacker Marina, Inc. 3301 Rickenbacker Causeway Key Biscayne, FL 33 149 River Run Yacht Club 1700 NW North River Dr. 33125 Sealine Marina 1635 N. Bayshore Dr. Miami, FL 33132 Snapper Creek Marina 11190 Snapper Creek Rd. Miami, FL 33156 South Bay Club 800 West Avenue Miami, FL 33139 South Dade Marina, Inc P.O. Bo x 343258 Florida City, FL 33034 Spinnaker Marina 1940 NE 135 Street Miami, FL 33181 Sunny Isle Marine 400 Sunny Isle Blvd. Miami, FL 33160 Sunset Harbor Marina 1928 Purdy Avenue Miami, FL 33139 Sunset Harbour Marina, Inc. 1928 Sunset Harbour Drive Miami Beach, FL 33139 Turnberry Isle Yacht and Club 19735 NE 36 Court Aventura, FL 33180 Waters Edge Condominium Association 100 Edgewater Drive Miami, FL 33133 Waterways Marina P.O. Box 800 136 Aventura, FL 33280 Williams Island Marina 7900 Isla nd Blvd. Miami, FL 33160 Winston Yacht Club Marina 250 NE 174 th Street Miami, FL 33160 Total: 53

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 211 of 237 Figure 2 2 Turkey Point Warning Si r ens ( Updated 2007)

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 212 of 237 Figure 2 3 20 12 Hurricane Evacuation Center s Source: Miami Dade E mergency M anagement

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 213 of 237 Figure 2 4 20 12 Medical Evacuation Centers (MEC) and Pet Friendly Evacuation Centers (PHEC) Source: Miami Dade E mergency M anagement Source: Miami Dade Emergency Management

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 214 of 237 Figure 2 5 20 12 Medical Management Facilities SITE ADDRESS CITY ZIP Jackson Memorial Hospital 1611 NW 12th Avenue Miami 33136 Baptist Health Systems 8900 North Kendall Drive Miami 33176 Kendall Medical C enter 11750 SW 40 th Street Miami 33175 Metropolitan Hospital 5959 NW 7 th Street Miami 33126 North S hore Medical Center 1100 NW 95 th Street Miami 33150 University of Miami Hospital 1400 NW 12 th Avenue Miami 33136 Palmetto Hospital 2001 W 68 th Street Hia leah 33016 Coral Gables Hospital 3100 Douglas Rd Coral Gables 33134 Miami Children's Hospital 3100 SW 62 nd Avenue Miami 33155 Mount Sinai Medical Center 4300 Alton Road Miami Beach 33140 Hialeah Hospital 651 E. 25 th Street Hialeah 33 016 Aventura Hospi tal 20900 Biscayne Blvd Aventura 33180 Kindred Hospital 5190 SW 8 Street Coral Gables 33134 Miami Jewish Home 5200 NE 2 nd Avenue Miami 33137 South Miami Hospital 6200 SW 73 rd Street Miami 33143 Mercy Hospital 3663 South Miami Avenue Miami 33133 Westch ester Hospital 2500 SW 75 th Avenue Miami 33155 Homestead Hospital 160 NW 13 th Street Homestead 33030 Jackson North Medical Center 160 NW 170 Street N. Miami Beach 33169 Jackson South Hospital 9333 SW 152 nd Street Miami 33157 Larkin Community Hospital 7031 SW 62 nd Avenue South Miami 33143 Palm Springs Hospital 1475 West 49 th Street Hialeah 33012 Health South Rehab 20 6 01 Old Cutler Road Cutler Bay 33189 Source: Miami Dade E mergency M anagement

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 215 of 237 Figure 2 6 Moveable Bridges NAME CONTACT ADDRESS LAT LON 79th Street east end State of Florida Biscayne Bay 25.84961 80.14472 79th Street west end State of Florida Intercoastal Waterway 25.84793 80.17136 Brickell Avenue Bridge State of Florida Miami River 25.76984 80.18997 Broad Causeway Inter coastal Waterway Intercoastal Waterway 25.88724 80.14242 CSX Railroad Bridge CSX Railroad Miami River 25.80606 80.25857 F.E.C. Railroad Bridge FEC RR/Port of Miami Intercoastal Waterway 25.77920 80.18217 Flagler Street State of Florida Miami River 25 .77418 80.20128 NE 63rd Street/Alton Road State of Florida Indian Creek 25.84436 80.12229 NW 12th Ave State of Florida Miami River 25.78262 80.21488 NW 17th Ave Miami Dade County Miami River 25.78552 80.22297 NW 22nd Ave Miami Dade County Miami Riv er 25.78876 80.23133 NW 27th Ave State of Florida Miami River 25.79266 80.23960 NW 5th Street State of Florida Miami River 25.77829 80.20696 Port Boulevard Port of Miami Intercoastal Waterway 25.77966 80.18190 South Miami Ave Miami Dade County Miam i River 25.76975 80.19350 Sunny Isles Causeway East Intercoastal Waterway 25.92981 80.13035 Sunny Isles Causeway West Intercoastal Waterway 25.93026 80.13034 SW 1st Street State of Florida Miami River 25.77300 80.20066 SW 2nd Ave. M D Close d for repairs Miami River 25.76890 80.19754 Venetian Causeway west end Miami Dade County Biscayne Bay 25.78980 80.18127 Venetian Causeway east end Miami Dade County Biscayne Bay 25.79112 80.15214

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 216 of 237 Figure 2 7 Moveable Bridges

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 217 of 237 Figure 28 Mi ami Dade County and Municipal Fire Stations

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 218 of 237 Figure 29 Miami Dade County and Municipal Police Stations

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 219 of 237 Fi g ure 30 Miami Dade County Hospitals

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 220 of 237 Fi g ure 3 1 Miami Dade County Primary Evacuation Routes

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 221 of 237 Figure 32 Promulgation Letter

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 222 of 237

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 223 of 237

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 225 of 237 Gl ossary of Key Terms Agency : A division of government with a specific function offering a particular kind of assistance. In ICS, agencies are defined either as jurisdictional (having statutory responsibility for incident ma n agement) or as assisting or coo perating (providing r e sources or ot her assistance). Agency Representative : A person assigned by a primary, assisting, or cooperating Federal, State, local, or tribal government agency or private entity that has been del e gated authority to make decisions affecting that agency's or organization's participation in incident management activities following appropriate consu ltation with the leadership of that agency. Alert: Notification of a hazard or an incident that potentially requires a coordinated Fede ral r e sponse. All Hazards: Describing an incident, natural or manmade, that warrants action to protect life, property, environment, public health or safety, and minimize disruptions of gover n ment, social, or economic activities. Area Command (Unified Area Command): An organization established (1) to oversee the ma n agement of multiple incidents that are each being handled by an ICS organiz a tion or (2) to oversee the management of large or multiple incidents to which several In cident Management Teams ha ve been assigned. Area Command has the responsibility to set overall strategy and priorities, allocate critical resources according to priorities, ensure that incidents are properly managed, and ensure that o b jectives are met and strategies followed. Area Command becomes Unified Area Command when incidents are multi jurisdictional. Area Command may be established at an emergency o p erations center facility or at some location other than an incident command post. Assessment : The evaluation and interpretati on of measurements and other information to provide a basis for decision making. Assignments : Tasks given to resources to perform within given operational periods that is based on o per a tional objectives defined in the IAP. Assistant : Title for subord inates of principal Command Staff positions. The title indicates a level of tec hnical capability, qualifications, and responsibility subordinate to the primary positions. Assi s tants may also be assigned to unit leaders. Available Resources : Resources as signed to an incident, checked in, and available for a mission assig nment, normally located in a Staging Area. Branch: The organizational level having functional or geographical responsibility for major aspects of inc ident operations. A Branch is organ izationally situated between the Section Chief and the Division or Group in the Operations Section, and between the Section and Units in the Logistics Section. Branches are ide nt i fied by the use of Roman numerals or by functional area.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 226 of 237 Catastrophic Inci dent: Any natural or manmade incident, including terrorism, that results in extraordinary levels of mass casualties, damage, or disruption that severely affects the population, infrastructure, env ironment, economy, national morale, and/or government funct ions. A catastrophic event could result in su stained national impacts over a prolonged period of time; almost immediately e x ceeds resources normally available to State, local, tribal, and private sector authorities in the impacted area; and significantly inte rrupts go v ernmental operations and emergency services to such an extent that national security could be threa t ened. Chain of Command : A series of command, control, executive, or management positions in hiera r chical order of authority. Check In : Th e process through which resources first report to an incident. Check in locations i n clude the incident command post, Resources Unit, incident base, camps, sta g ing areas, or directly on the site. Chief : The ICS title for individuals responsible for manag ement of functional sections: Operations, Pla nning, Logistics, Finance/Administration, and Intelligence (if established as a separate section). Climate Change : Any change in global temperatures and precipitation over time due to natural variability or to human impact. Command : The act of directing, ordering, or controlling by virtue of explicit statutory, regulatory, or del egated authority. Command Staff : In an incident management organization, the Command Staff consists of the Incident Command and th e special staff positions of Public Information Officer, Safety Officer, Lia i son Officer, and other positions as required, who report directly to the Incident Commander. They may have an assistant or assistants, as needed. Communications Unit: An organi zational unit in the Logistics Section responsible for providing commun ication services at an incident or an EOC. A Communications Unit may also be a facility (e.g., a trailer or m o bile van) used to support an Incident Communications Center. Coordinate : To advance systematically an analysis and exchange of information among principals who have or may have a need to know certain information to carry out specific incident management respons ibi l ities. Corrective Actions: Implementing procedures that are based on lessons learned from actual i n cidents or from training and exercises. Dengue Fever: A n infectious disease of the tropics transmitted by mosquitoes and characterized by high fevers, headache, rash, a nd joint and muscle pain. Deputy : A fully qu alified individual who, in the absence of a superior, can be delegated the authority to manage a functional operation or perform a specific task. In some cases, a deputy can act as relief for a

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 227 of 237 superior and, therefore, must be f ully qualified in the pos i ti on. Deputies can be assigned to the Incident Commander, General Staff, and Branch Directors. Dispatch : The ordered movement of a resource or resources to an assigned operational mission or an administrative move from one location to another. Divisio n : The partition of an incident into geographical areas of operation. Divisions are esta b lished when the number of resources exceeds the manageable span of control of the Operations Chief. A division is located within the ICS organ ization between the branc h and resources in the Operations Section. Disaster Housing: P rovides up to 18 months temporary housing assistance, using local r e sources, for displaced persons whose residences were heavily damaged or destroyed. Funding also can be provided for housing repairs and replacement of damaged items to make homes habi t able. Disaster Recovery Center (DRC): A facility established in a centralized location within or near the disa ster area at which disa s ter victims (individuals, families, or businesses) apply for disaster aid. Droughts: A lack of precipitation into an area for a long period of time, resulting in below normal recor d ed levels, causing serious hydrological imbalances that adversely affect land resource production sy s tems. Emergency : Absent a Pres idential declared emergency, any incident(s), human caused or natural, that requires responsive action to protect life or property. Under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, an emergency means any o c casion or instance for w hich, in the determination of the President, Federal assistance is needed to supplement State and local efforts and capabilities to save lives and to pr o tect property and public health and safety, or to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in any part of the United States. Emergency Management/Response Personnel: Includes Federal, State, territorial, tribal, substate r egional, and local governments, private sector organizations, critical infr a structure owners and operators, nongovernmental organ izations, and all other organizations and individuals who assume an emergency management role. Also known as emergency responders. Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs): The physical location at which the coordination of i n formation and resources to supp ort domestic incident management activities normally takes place. An EOC may be a temporary facility or may be located in a more central or permanently established facility, perhaps at a higher level of organization within a jurisdiction. EOCs may be orga n ized by major functional disciplines (e.g., fire, law enforcement, and medical services), by jurisdi c tion (e.g., Federal, State, regional, county, city, tribal), or some combination thereof. Emergency Operations Plan : The "steady state" plan maintained by various jurisdictional levels for r esponding to a wide variety of potential hazards.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 228 of 237 Emergency Public Information : Information that is disseminated primarily in anticip a tion of an emergency or during an emergency. In addition to providing situationa l information to the public, it also frequently pr ovides directive actions required to be taken by the general public. Emergency Support Functions: ESFs align categories of resources and provide strategic obje c tives for their use. ESFs utilize standard ized resource management concepts such as typing, invent o rying, and tracking to facilitate the dispatch, deployment, and recovery of resources before, during, and after an inc ident. The Basic identifies primary ESF agencies on the basis of authorities and resources. Support age ncies are assigned based on the availability of resources in a given functional area. Evacuation : Organized, phased, and supervised withdrawal, dispersal, or removal of civilians from da ngerous or potentially dangerous areas, an d their reception and care in safe areas. Event : A planned, none emergency activity. ICS can be used as the management sy s tem for a wide range of events, e.g., parades, concerts, or sporting events. Exotic Pests: 'Exotic' by definition implies non n ative status. Therefore, an exotic pest would be one that migrates or is imported to a new location in which there are no natural predators or other controls on its proliferation. Exotic pests are capable of causing significant di s ruption in their adopte d environments by out compet ing native species and driv ing them to extinction or by chang ing the ecosystem by altering rel ationships within it. Federal : Of or pertaining to the Federal Government of the United States of America. Function : Function re fers to the five major activities in ICS: Command, Operations, Planning, L o gistics, and Finance/Administration. The term function is also used when describing the activity involved, e.g., the planning function. A sixth function, Intelligence, may be establ ished, if required, to meet incident manag ement needs. General Staff : A group of incident management personnel organized according to fun c tion and reporting to the Incident Commander. The General Staff normally consists of the Operations Se c tion Chief, Planning Section Chief, Logistics Section Chief, and F i nance/Administration Section Chief. Group : Established to divide the incident management structure into functional areas of operation. Groups are composed of resources assembled to perform a specia l function not necessarily within a single ge ographic division. Groups, when activated, are located between branches and r e sources in the Operations Section. (See Division.) Hazard : Something that is potentially dangerous or harmful, often the root caus e of an unwanted outcome. Incident : An occurrence or event, natural or human caused that requires an emergency response to pr otect life or property. Incidents can, for example, include major disasters, emergencies, terrorist attacks, te rrorist threats, wildland and urban fires, floods, hazardous materials spills, nuclear accidents, aircraft acc i-

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 229 of 237 dents, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, tropical storms, war related di s asters, public health and medical emergencies, and other occurrences requiring an emerg ency response. Incident Action Plan : An oral or written plan containing ge n eral objectives reflecting the overall strategy for managing an incident. It may include the identification of oper a tional resources and assignments. It may also include attachme nts that provide dire c tion and important information for management of the incident during one or more o p erational periods. Incident Command: Responsible for overall management of the incident and consists of the Incident Commander, either single or uni fied command, and any assigned supporting staff. Incident Command Post (ICP): The field location at which the primary tactical level, on scene incident command functions are performed. The ICP may be collocated with the incident base or other incident f aci lities and is normally identified by a green rotating or flashing light. Incident Command System (ICS): A standardized on scene emergency management construct specifica lly designed to provide for the adoption of an integrated organizational structure that r e flects the complexity and demands of single or multiple incidents, without being hindered by juri s dictional boundaries. ICS is the combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a co mmon organizatio nal struc ture, designed to aid in the management of resources during inc i dents. It is used for all kinds of emergencies and is applicable to small as well as large and complex inc i dents. ICS is used by various jurisdictions and functional agencies, both pu blic and private, to organize field level inci dent manag e ment operations. Incident Commander (IC): The individual responsible for all incident activities, including the d e velopment of strategies and tactics and the ordering and the release of r e sources. The IC has overall authority and responsibility for conducting incident operations and is responsible for the management of all incident ope rations at the incident site. Incident Management Team (IMT) : The IC and appropriate Command and General Staff pe rsonnel a ssigned to an incident. Incident Objectives : Statements of guidance and direction necessary for selecting a p propriate strategy(s) and the tactical direction of resources. Incident objectives are based on realistic expe c tations of what can be ac complished have been effectively d e ployed. Incident objectives must be achievable and measurable, yet flexible enough to allow strategic and tactical alternatives. Joint Information Center (JIC): A facility established to coordinate all incident related public i n formation activities. It is the central point of contact for all news media at the scene of the incident. Public information officials from all participatin g agencies should collocate at the JIC. Joint Information System (JIS): Integrates inci dent information and public affairs into a cohesive organ ization designed to provide consistent, coordinated, timely information during crisis or inc i dent operations. The mission of the JIS is to provide a structure and system for developing and delivering coordinated inte r-

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 230 of 237 agency messages; developing, recommending, and execu t ing public information plans and strategies on behalf of the IC; advising the IC concerning public affairs i s sues that could affect a response effort; and controlling rumors and inaccur ate information that could undermine public confidence in the eme r gency response effort. Jurisdiction : A range or sphere of authority. Public agencies have jurisdiction at an incident r e lated to their legal responsibilities and authority. Jurisdictional authority at an incident can be polit i cal or geographical (e.g., city, county, tribal, Sta te, or Federal boundary lines) or functional (e.g., law enforcement, public health). Lead Agency: While several County departments will be performing varied and cr itical tasks during a di sncy shall be responsible for detailed planning, testing, and evaluation of their respe c tive emergency support function(s) plans/a ctivities. The Department Director of the primary agency shall serve as the principal a dvisor to the County Executive during the response and reco v ery phase. In addition, the Department Director of the primary agency must assure that essential operations o f his/her agency will continue, unless othe rwise directed by the County Executive or his/her de s ignee. Liaison Officer : A member of the Command Staff responsible for coordinating with represent a tives from cooperating and assisting agencies. Local Gover nment : A county, municipality, city, town, township, local public authority, school district, sp ecial district, intrastate district, council of gover n ments (regardless of whether the council of governments is incorporated as a nonprofit corporation under S tate law), regional or interstate government entity, or age ncy or instrumentality of a local government; an Indian tribe or authorized tribal organization, or in Alaska a Native village or Alaska Regional Native Corp o ration; a rural community, unincorporat ed town or village, or other public entity. See Section 2 (10), Hom e land Security Act of 2002, Pub. L. 107 296, 116 Stat. 2135 (2002). Logistics : Providing resources and other services to support incident management. Logistics Se c tion: The section respo nsible for providing facilities, services, and material support for the incident. Major Disaster : As defined under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assi s tance Act (42 U.S.C. 5122), a major disaster is any natural catastrophe (includi ng any hurricane, tornado, storm, high water, wind driven water, tidal wave, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, mudslide, sno wstorm, or drought), or, regardless of cause, any fire, flood, or explosion, in any part of the United States, whi ch in the determination of the President causes damage of su f ficient severity and magnitude to warrant major disaster assistance under this Act to supplement the efforts and available resources of States, tribes, local governments, and disaster relief orga nizations in a l leviating the damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused thereby. Management by Objective : A management approach that involves a four step process for achie v ing the incident goal. The Management by Objectives approach includes the follow ing: establishing overarching objectives; developing and issuing a ssignments, plans, procedures, and protocols; establishing specific,

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 231 of 237 measurable objectives for various incident management functional a c tivities and directing efforts to fulfill them, in sup port of defined strategic objectives; and documenting results to measure performance and f aci l itate corrective action. Memorandum of Understanding: An agreement between agencies (internal and e x ternal) located within the jurisdictions on cooperative effo rts and services, which would be provided during a disaster. The age ncies involved usually maintain command of their personnel while providing specific services to the comm unity at large and in conjun c tion with the normal resources available in the communi ty. Mitigation : The activities designed to reduce or eliminate risks to persons or property or to lessen the a ctual or potential effects or consequences of an incide nt. Mitigation measures may be impl e mented prior to, during, or after an incident. Mitiga tion measures are often informed by lessons learned from prior incidents. Mitigation involves ongoing actions to reduce exposure to, probability of, or potential loss from hazards. Measures may i n clude zoning and building codes, floodplain buyouts, and ana lysis of hazard related data to determine where it is safe to build or locate temporary facilities. Mitig a tion can include efforts to educate governments, businesses, and the public on measures they can take to reduce loss and injury. Mobilization : The process and procedures used by all organizations Federal, State, local, and tribal for activating, assembling, and transporting all resources that have been requested to r e spond to or support an incident. Multi agency Coordination Entity : A multi agen cy coordination entity functions within a broader multi agency coordination system. It may establish the priorities among incidents and associated resource alloc ations, deconflict agency policies, and provide strategic guidance and direction to support inci dent manag ement activities. Multi agency Coordination Systems : Multi agency coordination systems provide the architecture to su pport coordination for incident prioritization, critical resource allocation, communications sy s tems integration, and informat ion c oordination. The components of multi agency coordination systems include facilities, equipment, emergency operation centers (EOCs), specific multi agency c o ordination entities, personnel, procedures, and communications. These systems assist agencies and organizations to fully integrate the subsystems of the NIMS. Multi jurisdictional Incident : An incident requiring action from multiple agencies that each have jurisdi ction to manage certain aspects of an incident. In ICS, these incidents will be man aged under Unified Co mmand. Mutual Aid Agreement : Written agreement between agencies and/or jurisdictions that they will assist one another on request, by furnishing personnel, equipment, and/or e x pertise in a specified manner. National : Of a nation wide character, including the Federal, State, local, and tribal aspects of go v ernance and polity.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 232 of 237 National Disaster Medical System : A cooperative, asset sharing partnership between the D e partment of Health and Human Services, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Defense. NDMS provides resources for meeting the continu i ty of care and mental health services requirements of the Emergency Support Fun c tion 8 in the Federal Response Plan. National In cident Management System : A system mandated by HSPD 5 that provides a consistent n ationwide approach for Federal, State, local, and tribal governments; the private sector, and nongovernme ntal organizations to work effectively and efficiently t o gether to pr epare for, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. To provide for interoperability and compatibility among Federal, State, local, and tribal capabilities, the NIMS includes a core set of concepts, pri n cipl es, and terminology. HSPD 5 identifies these as the ICS; multi agency coordination systems; training; identif ication and management of resources (including systems for classifying types of resources); qualification and certification; and the collection, tr ac k ing, and reporting of incident information and incident resources. National Response Framework : A guide that details how the Nation conducts all hazards r e sponse from the smallest incident to the largest catastrophe. This document establishes a comp rehensive, n a tional, all hazards approach to domestic incident response. Nongovernmental Organization : An entity with an association that is based on inte r ests of its members, individuals, or institutions and that is not created by a government, but may work cooperatively with go vernment. Such organizations serve a public purpose, not a private benefit. Exa m ples of NGOs include faith based charity organizations and the American Red Cross. Operational Period : The time scheduled for executing a given se t of operation actions, as spec i fied in the Incident Action Plan. Operational periods can be of various lengths, although usually not over 24 hours. Operations Section : The section responsible for all tactical incident operations. In ICS, it normally inc ludes subordinate branches, divisions, and/or groups. Personnel Accountability : The ability to account for the location and welfare of incident perso n nel. It is accomplished when supervisors ensure that ICS principles and processes are functional and tha t personnel are working within established incident management guidelines. Phenology : The scientific study of biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions. The relationship between a biological phe nomenon and climatic cond i tions. Planning Meeting : A meeting held as needed prior to and throughout the duration of an incident to select specific strategies and tactics for incident control operations and for service and support planning. For lar ger inci dents, the planning meeting is a major el e ment in the development of the Incident Action Plan (IAP). Planning Section : Responsible for the collection, evaluation, and dissemination of o p erational information related to the incident, and for the preparat ion and documentation of the IAP. This se c tion also maintains information on the current and forecasted situation and on the status of r e sources assigned to the incident.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 233 of 237 Preparedness : The range of deliberate, critical tasks and activities necessary to build, sustain, and i mprove the operational capability to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from domestic inc idents. Preparedness is a continuous process. Prepare d ness involves efforts at all levels of government and between government and private sector and nongovernmental organizations to identify threats, determine vulnerabilities, an d identify required resources. Within the NIMS, pr e paredness is operationally focused on establishing guidelines, protocols, and standards for planning, trai ning and exercises, personnel qualific ation and certification, equipment certification, and publication management. Prevention : Actions to avoid an incident or to intervene to stop an incident from occurring. Prevention i nvolves actions to protect lives and property. It involves applying intelligence and other information to a range of activities that may include such countermeasures as deterrence operations; heightened inspe ctions; improved surveillance and s e curity operations; investigations to determi ne the full nature and source of the threat; public health and agricultural surveillance and testing pro c esses; immunizations, isolation, or quarantine; and, as appropriate, specific law enforcement operations aimed at deterring, preempting, inte rdicting, or disrupting illegal activity and apprehending pote n tial perpetrators and bringing them to justice. Private Sector : Organizations and entities that are not part of any governmental structure. It i n cludes for profit and not for profit organizations, for mal and informal structures, commerce and i n dustry, and private voluntary organizations (PVO). Processes: Systems of operations that incorporate standardized proc edures, methodologies, and functions necessary to provide resources effectively and efficientl y. These i nclude resource typing, resource ordering and tracking, and coordin a tion. Public Information Officer : A member of the Command Staff responsible for interfa c ing with the public and media or with other agencies with incident related information r equirements. Recovery : The development, coordination, and execution of service and site restoration plans; the reco nstitution of government operations and services; individual, private sector, nongover n mental, and public assistance programs to provide housi ng and to promote restoration; long term care and treatment of affec ted persons; additional measures for social, political, environmental, and economic restoration; evalu a tion of the incident to identify lessons learned; post incident reporting; and development of initiatives to m i tigate the e f fects of future incidents. Recovery Plan : A plan developed by a State, local, or tribal jurisdiction with assistance from r e sponding Federal agencies to restore the affected area. Resources : Personnel and major items of equipment, supplies, and facilities available or potentially avail able for assignment to incident operations and for which status is maintained. Resources are described by kind and type and may be used in operational support or supervisory c apacities at an incident or at an EOC. Resource Management : Efficient incident management requires a system for identifying available r esources at all jurisdictional levels to enable timely and unimpeded a c cess to resources needed to prepare for, respon d to, or recover from an incident. Resource management under the NIMS includes mutual aid agreements; the use of special Federal, State, local, and tribal teams; and r e source mobilization protocols.

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 234 of 237 Resources Unit : Functional unit within the Planning Sect ion responsible for recording the status of r esources committed to the incident. This unit also evaluates resources currently committed to the incident, the effects additional responding resources will have on the incident, and anticipated r e source needs. Response : Activities that address the short term, direct effects of an incident. Response includes immed iate actions to save lives, protect property, and meet basic human needs. Response also includes the ex ecution of emergency operations plans and of m itigation activities designed to limit the loss of life, personal injury, property damage, and other unfavorable outcomes. As indicated by the situation, response activities i n clude applying intelligence and other information to lessen the effects or conse quences of an incident; increased security operations; continuing investigations into nature and source of the threat; ongoing public health and agricultural surveillance and testing processes; immunizations, isolation, or quaran tine; and specific law enfo rcement operations aimed at preempting, interdicting, or disrupting illegal activity, and a pprehending actual perpetrators and bringing them to justice. Safety Officer : A member of the Command Staff responsible for monitoring and a s sessing safety hazard s or unsafe situations and for developing measures for ensuring personnel safety. Sea Level Rise: A rise in the surface of the sea due to increased water volume of the ocean and/or sinking of the land. The rise and fall of sea levels throughout time in r e sponse to global climate and local tectonic changes. Section : The organizational level ha v ing responsibility for a major functional area of incident management, e.g., Operations, Planning, Logistics, Finance/Administration, and Intell i gence (if establi shed). The section is organizationally situated between the branch and the Incident Co m mand. Span of Control : The number of individuals a supervisor is responsible for usually e x pressed as the ratio of supervisors to individuals. (Under the NIMS, an app ropriate span of control is between 1:3 and 1:7.) Special Needs Population: A population whose members may have additional needs b e fore, during, and after an incident in one or more of the following functional areas: maintaining independence, communic ation, transportation, supervision, and med i cal care. Individuals in need of additional response assistance may include those who have disabilities; who live in institutionalized settings; who are elderly; who are chi ldren; who are from diverse cultures, w ho have limited English proficiency, or who are non English spea king; or who are transportation disadvantaged. Support Agency : An agency or organization providing personnel, services, or other resources to the agency with direct responsibility for incide nt management. Staging Area : Established for the temporary location of available resources. A staging area can be any location in which personnel, supplies, and equipment can be tempora r ily housed or parked while awaiting operational assignment. Sto rm Surge: An abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane or other intense storm, and whose height is the difference between the observed level of the sea surface during the storm and normal sea le v-

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 235 of 237 el. Storm surge is caused primarily by high winds pushing on the ocean's surface and is especially severe when accompanied by high tide. Strategic : Strategic elements of incident management are characterized by continuous long term, high level planning by organizations headed by elected or other senior officials. These elements involve the adoption of long range goals and objectives, the se t ting of priorities; the establishment of budgets and other fiscal decisions, policy development, and the application of measures of pe r formance or effectiveness. Strike Team : A set number of resources of the same kind and type that have an established minimum number of personnel. Strategy : The general direction selected to accomplish incident objectives set by the IC. Supporting Technologies : Any technolog y that may be used to support the NIMS is included in this su bsystem. These technologies include orthophoto mapping, remote automatic weather stations, infrared tec hnology, and communications, among various others. Task Force : Any combination of resource s assembled to support a specific mission or operational need. All resource elements within a Task Force must have common communications and a desi g nated leader. Technical Assistance : Support provided to State, local, and tribal jurisdictions when they have the r esources but lack the complete knowledge and skills needed to perform a required activity (such as mobile home park design and hazardous material asses s ments). Terrorism : Under the Homeland Security Act of 2002, terro r ism is defined as activity that involves an act dangerous to human life or potentially destructive of critical infr a structure or key resources and is a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State or other subdivision of the United States in which it occurs a nd is intended to intimidate or coerce the civilian population or influence a government or affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping. See Se c tion 2 (15), Homeland Security Act of 2002, Pub. L. 107 296, 116 Stat. 2135 (2002). Threat : An indication of possible violence, harm, or danger. Tribal : Any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Ala s kan Native Village as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaskan Native Cl aims Settlement Act (85 stat. 688) [43 U.S.C.A. and 1601 et seq.], that is recognized as eligib le for the special pr o grams and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. Type : A classification of resources in th e ICS that refers to capability. Type 1 is generally considered to be more capable than Types 2, 3, or 4, respectively, because of size; power; capacity; or, in the case of inc ident management teams, experience and qualif i cations. Unified Area Command : A Unified Area Command is established when incidents under an Area Co mmand are multi jurisdictional (See Area Command.)

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Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan Revised: June 2013 Page 236 of 237 Unified Command : An application of ICS used when there is more than one agency with incident jurisdi ction or when incidents cross polit ical jurisdictions. Agencies work together through the designated members of the UC, often the seni or person from agencies and/or disciplines participating in the UC, to establish a common set of objectives and strat e gies and a single IAP. Unit : The orga nizational element having functional responsibility for a specific incident planning, logistics, or finance/administration activity. Unity of Command : The concept by which each person within an organization reports to one and only one designated person. The purpose of unity of command is to ensure unity of effort under one responsible commander for every objective. Viral H e morrhagic Fever: The term hemorrhagic fever is used to describe several severe and life threatening viruses, usually spread from eit her insects or mammals to humans. Volunteer : For purposes of the NIMS, a volunteer is any individual accepted to perform services by the lead agency, which has authority to accept volunteer services, when the individual performs services wit hout promise, expectation, or receipt of compensation for services performed. See, e.g., 16 U.S.C. 742f(c) and 29 CFR 553.101. Zoonotic : A disease that can be tran s mitted from animals to people or, more specifically, a disease that normally exists in animals but, tha t can infect humans.

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